77 Works

Data from: A novel approach to wildlife transcriptomics provides evidence of disease-mediated differential expression and changes to the microbiome of amphibian populations

Lewis J. Campbell, Stewart A. Hammond, Stephen J. Price, Manmohan D. Sharma, Trenton W.J. Garner, Inanc Birol, Caren C. Helbing, Lena Wilfert, Amber G.F. Griffiths & Trenton W. J. Garner
Ranaviruses are responsible for a lethal, emerging infectious disease in amphibians and threaten their populations throughout the world. Despite this, little is known about how amphibian populations respond to ranaviral infection. In the United Kingdom, ranaviruses impact the common frog (Rana temporaria). Extensive public engagement in the study of ranaviruses in the UK has led to the formation of a unique system of field sites containing frog populations of known ranaviral disease history. Within this...

Data from: A high quality pedigree and genetic markers both reveal inbreeding depression for quality but not survival in a cooperative mammal

David A. Wells, Michael A. Cant, Hazel J. Nichols, Joe I. Hoffman & Joseph I. Hoffman
Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of closely related parents, is commonplace in both captive and wild populations and has important consequences for conservation and mating system evolution. However, because of the difficulty of collecting pedigree and life history data from wild populations, relatively few studies have been able to compare inbreeding depression for traits at different points in the life cycle. Moreover, pedigrees give the expected proportion of the genome that is identical...

Data from: Application of a novel molecular method to age free-living wild Bechstein’s bats

Patrick G.R. Wright, Fiona Mathews, Henry Schofield, Colin Morris, Joe Burrage, Adam Smith, Emma L. Dempster, Patrick B. Hamilton & Patrick G. R. Wright
The age profile of populations fundamentally affects their conservation status. Yet age is frequently difficult to assess in wild animals. Here, we assessed the use of DNA methylation of homologous genes to establish the age structure of a rare and elusive wild mammal: the Bechstein’s bat (Myotis bechsteinii). We collected 62 wing punches from individuals whose ages were known as a result of a long-term banding study. DNA methylation was measured at seven CpG sites...

Data from: Bumble-BEEHAVE: a systems model for exploring multifactorial causes of bumblebee decline at individual, colony, population and community level

Matthias A. Becher, Grace Twiston-Davies, Tim D. Penny, Dave Goulson, Ellen L. Rotheray, Juliet L. Osborne & Grace Twiston‐Davies
1. Worldwide declines in pollinators, including bumblebees, are attributed to a multitude of stressors such as habitat loss, resource availability, emerging viruses and parasites, exposure to pesticides, and climate change operating at various spatial and temporal scales. Disentangling individual and interacting effects of these stressors, and understanding their impact at the individual, colony and population level is a challenge for systems ecology. Empirical testing of all combinations and contexts is not feasible. A mechanistic multi-level...

Data from: Senescent declines in elite tennis players are similar across the sexes

Andreas Sutter, Sam Barton, Manmohan Dev Sharma, Ugofilippo Basellini, David J. Hosken & Catharine Ruth Archer
Aging is characterized by rising mortality, declining fertility and declines in physiological function with age (functional senescence). Sex-differences in the tempo and severity of survival and fertility declines are widespread, but it is less clear how often, and how much trajectories of functional senescence diverge between the sexes. We tested how physiological function changed with age in male and female elite tennis players using first-serve speed (power) and first-serve accuracy as performance measures. We found...

Data from: Rapid antagonistic coevolution in an emerging pathogen and its vertebrate host

Camille Bonneaud, Mathieu Giraudeau, Luc Tardy, Molly Staley, Geoffrey E. Hill & Kevin J. McGraw
Host-pathogen coevolution is assumed to play a key role in eco-evolutionary processes, including epidemiological dynamics and the evolution of sexual reproduction [1-4]. Despite this, direct evidence for host-pathogen coevolution is exceptional [5-7], particularly in vertebrate hosts. Indeed, although vertebrate hosts have been shown to evolve in response to pathogens or vice versa [8-12], there is little evidence for the necessary reciprocal changes in the success of both antagonists over time [13]. Here, we generate a...

Data from: Social structure contains epidemics and regulates individual roles in disease transmission in a group-living mammal

Carly Rozins, Matthew J. Silk, Darren P. Croft, Richard J. Delahay, Dave J. Hodgson, Robbie A. McDonald, Nicola Weber & Mike Boots
Population structure is critical to infectious disease transmission. As a result, theoretical and empirical contact networks models of infectious disease spread are increasingly providing valuable insights into wildlife epidemiology. Analysing an exceptionally detailed data set on contact structure within a high-density population of European badgers Meles meles, we show that a modular contact network produced by spatially structured stable social groups, lead to smaller epidemics, particularly for infections with intermediate transmissibility. The key advance is...

Data from: The application of self-limiting transgenic insects in managing resistance in experimental metapopulations

Liqin Zhou, Nina Alphey, Adam S. Walker, Laura M. Travers, Neil I. Morrison, Michael B. Bonsall & Ben Raymond
1. The mass release of transgenic insects carrying female lethal self-limiting genes can reduce pest insect populations. Theoretically, substantial releases can be a novel resistance management tool, since wild type alleles conferring susceptibility to pesticides can dilute resistance alleles in target populations. A potential barrier to the deployment of this technology is the need for large-scale area wide releases. Here we address whether localized releases of transgenic insects could provide an alternative, means of population...

Data from: Chemical regulation of body feather microbiota in a wild bird

Staffan Jacob, Louis Sallé, Lucie Zinger, Alexis S. Chaine, Christine Ducamp, Léa Boutault, Andrew F. Russell & Philipp Heeb
The microbiota has a broad range of impacts on host physiology and behaviour, pointing out the need to improve our comprehension of the drivers of host microbiota composition. Of particular interest is whether the microbiota is acquired passively, or whether and to what extent hosts themselves shape the acquisition and maintenance of their microbiota. In birds, the uropygial gland produces oily secretions used to coat feathers that have been suggested to act as an antimicrobial...

Data from: Sperm morphology and the evolution of intracellular sperm-egg interactions

Helen M. Southern, Mitchell A. Berger, Philippe G. Young & Rhonda R. Snook
Sperm morphology is incredibly diverse, even among closely related species, yet the coevolution between males and females of fertilization recognition systems is necessary for successful karyogamy (male and female pronuclear fusion). In most species, the entire sperm enters the egg during fertilization so sperm morphological diversity may impact the intra-cellular sperm-egg interactions necessary for karyogamy. We quantified morphological variation of sperm inside eggs prior to and following karyogamy in several species of Drosophila to understand...

Data from: Nature, extent and ecological implications of night-time light from road vehicles

Kevin J. Gaston & Lauren A. Holt
1.The erosion of night‐time by the introduction of artificial lighting constitutes a profound pressure on the natural environment. It has altered what had for millennia been reliable signals from natural light cycles used for regulating a host of biological processes, with impacts ranging from changes in gene expression to ecosystem processes. 2.Studies of these impacts have focused almost exclusively on those resulting from stationary sources of light emissions, and particularly streetlights. However, mobile sources, especially...

Data from: Variation in defence strategies in the metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens is indicative of synergies and trade-offs between forms of defence

Helen N. Fones, Gail M. Preston & J. Andrew C. Smith
The metal hyperaccumulator, N. caerulescens, uses metals as a defence against pathogens. Earlier work has suggested both trade-offs and synergies between metals and inducible defences. Different populations of N. caerulescens vary in metal accumulation. Here, we test the hypothesis that this produces different outcomes in trade-offs between defences. We compare zinc concentrations, glucosinolate concentrations, and inducible stress responses, including ROS and cell death, in four N. caerulescens populations, and relate these to the growth of...

Data from: Assessing reliance on vector navigation in the long-distance oceanic migrations of green sea turtles

Giulia Cerritelli, Giuseppe Bianco, Giacomo Santini, Annette C. Broderick, Brendan J. Godley, Graeme C. Hays, Paolo Luschi & Susanne Åkesson
Vector navigation, i.e. maintaining a constant heading for a given amount of time, is hypothesized to provide a viable basis for the navigational feats of a number of long-distance animal migrants. Since animals following this strategy are subject to drift by wind or by ocean current, performing long migrations relying on vector navigation is particularly challenging. We tested whether vector navigation could be involved in the migrations of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) that migrate between...

Data from: Individual variation and the source-sink group dynamics of extra-group paternity in a social mammal

Paula H. Marjamaki, Hannah L. Dugdale, Deborah A. Dawson, Robbie A. McDonald, Richard Delahay, Terry Burke & Alastair J. Wilson
Movement of individuals, or their genes, can influence eco-evolutionary processes in structured populations. We have limited understanding of the extent to which spatial behaviour varies among groups and individuals within populations. Here we use genetic pedigree reconstruction in a long-term study of European badgers (Meles meles) to characterise the extent of extra-group paternity, occurring as a consequence of breeding excursions, and to test hypothesised drivers of variation at multiple levels. We jointly estimate parentage and...

Data from: Global patterns of the double mutualism phenomenon

Francisco Fuster, Christopher Kaiser-Bunbury, Jens M. Olesen & Anna Traveset
A double mutualism (DM) occurs when two interacting species benefit each other in two different functions, e.g. when an animal species acts both as pollinator and seed disperser of the same plant. Besides the double benefit, a DM also imposes a larger risk to both functions if the performance of one partner declines. We conducted the first global review of DMs involving pollinators and seed dispersers, aiming to: (1) assess their prevalence across ecosystems and...

Natural wetland methane and permafrost thaw feedback modelling with JULES-IMOGEN (1850-2100)

E. Comyn-Platt, G. Hayman, C. Huntingford, S.E. Chadburn, E. J. Burke, A.B. Harper, W.J. Collins, C.P. Webber, T. Powell, P.M. Cox, N. Gedney & S. Sitch
These data contain 408 instances of annual model output from JULES/IMOGEN simulations, covering the period between 1850-2100. Each simulation (which corresponds to one netcdf file) provides annual average of carbon stocks of the land, atmosphere and ocean store required to calculate the anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions as the residual of the yearly changes. Also included are the global warming variables, fractional land-cover, natural wetland extent and methane (CH4) flux and the soil temperature and moisture...

Movement of songbirds between supplementary feeders in urban neighbourhoods in Southern England, UK

D.T.C. Cox & K.J. Gaston
This dataset contains the time, date and location of when songbirds fitted with a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag) visited a bird feeder fitted with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology. We tagged seven species (n = 348), with Blue tits and Great tits being the most abundantly caught. RFID bird feeders were set up in networks of 20 feeders each in urban gardens at three sites in Southern England.

Drosophila C virus genomes, Cambridge (2017)

F.M. Jiggins & B. Longdon
The resource consists of genome sequence data for the Drosophila C virus that has been serially passaged through different species of Drosophila in the laboratory. The genomes were sequenced and aligned to the reference genome. The frequency of variants at both biallelic and triallelic sites was then calculated. We also generated a phylogeny of the species involved using published data. This data was generated to understand how viruses adapt to new host species by Francis...

Data from: Biallelic SQSTM1 mutations in early-onset, variably progressive neurodegeneration

Valentina Muto, Elisabetta Flex, Zachary Kupchinsky, Guido Primiano, Hamid Galehdari, Mohammadreza Dehghani, Serena Cecchetti, Giovanna Carpentieri, Teresa Rizza, Neda Mazaheri, Alireza Sedaghat, Mohammad Yahya Vahidi Mehrjardi, Alice Traversa, Michela Di Nottia, Maria M. Kousi, Yalda Jamshidi, Andrea Ciolfi, Viviana Caputo, Reza Azizi Malamiri, Francesca Pantaleoni, Simone Martinelli, Aaron R. Jeffries, Jawaher Zeighami, Amir Sherafat, Daniela Di Giuda … & Marco Tartaglia
Objective: To characterize clinically and molecularly an early-onset, variably progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a cerebellar syndrome with severe ataxia, gaze palsy, dyskinesia, dystonia, and cognitive decline affecting 11 individuals from 3 consanguineous families. Methods: We used whole-exome sequencing (WES) (families 1 and 2) and a combined approach based on homozygosity mapping and WES (family 3). We performed in vitro studies to explore the effect of the nontruncating SQSTM1 mutation on protein function and the...

Data from: Phylogeny, evidence for a cryptic plastid, and distribution of Chytriodinium parasites (Dinophyceae) infecting copepods

Jürgen F.H. Strassert, Elisabeth Hehenberger, Javier Del Campo, Noriko Okamoto, Martin Kolisko, Thomas A. Richards, Alexandra Z. Worden, Alyson E. Santoro, Patrick J. Keeling & Javier Campo
Spores of the dinoflagellate Chytriodinium are known to infest copepod eggs causing their lethality. Despite the potential to control the population of such an ecologically important host, knowledge about Chytriodinium parasites is limited: we know little about phylogeny, parasitism, abundance, or geographical distribution. We carried out genome sequence surveys on four manually isolated sporocytes from the same sporangium to analyse the phylogenetic position of Chytriodinium based on SSU and concatenated SSU/LSU rRNA gene sequences, and...

Data from: The role of indirect genetic effects in the evolution of interacting reproductive behaviors in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides

Mauricio J. Carter, Alastair J. Wilson, Allen J. Moore & Nick J. Royle
Social interactions can give rise to indirect genetic effects (IGEs), which occur when genes expressed in one individual affect the phenotype of another individual. The evolutionary dynamics of traits can be altered when there are IGEs. Sex often involves indirect effects arising from first order (current) or second order (prior) social interactions, yet IGEs are infrequently quantified for reproductive behaviors. Here, we use experimental populations of burying beetles that have experienced bidirectional selection on mating...

Data from: Inbreeding intensifies sex- and age-dependent disease in a wild mammal

Clare H. Benton, Richard J. Delahay, Freya A.P. Smith, Andrew Robertson, Robbie A. McDonald, Andrew J. Young, Terry A. Burke, Dave Hodgson & Freya A. P. Smith
1. The mutation accumulation theory of senescence predicts that age-related deterioration of fitness can be exaggerated when inbreeding causes homozygosity for deleterious alleles. A vital component of fitness, in natural populations, is the incidence and progression of disease. 2. Evidence is growing for natural links between inbreeding and ageing; between inbreeding and disease; between sex and ageing; and between sex and disease. However, there is scant evidence, to date, for links among age, disease, inbreeding...

Data from: Multi-proxy evidence highlights a complex evolutionary legacy of maize in South America

Logan Kistler, S. Yoshi Maezumi, Jonas Gregorio De Souza, Natalia A. S. Przelomska, Flaviane Malaquias Costa, Oliver Smith, Hope Loiselle, Jazmín Ramos-Madrigal, Nathan Wales, Eduardo Rivail Ribeiro, Ryan R. Morrison, Claudia Grimaldo, Andre P. Prous, Bernardo Arriaza, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Fabio De Oliveira Freitas & Robin G. Allaby
Domesticated maize evolved from wild teosinte under human influences in Mexico beginning around 9,000 BP, traversed Central America by ~7,500 BP, and spread into South America by ~6,500 BP. Landrace and archaeological maize genomes from South America suggest that the ancestral population to South American maize was brought out of the domestication center in Mexico and became isolated from the wild teosinte gene pool before traits of domesticated maize were fixed. Deeply structured lineages then...

Data from: Seabird species vary in behavioural response to drone census

Émile Brisson-Curadeau, David Bird, Chantelle Burke, David A. Fifield, Paul Pace, Richard B. Sherley & Kyle H. Elliott
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide an opportunity to rapidly census wildlife in remote areas while removing some of the hazards. However, wildlife may respond negatively to the UAVs, thereby skewing counts. We surveyed four species of Arctic cliff-nesting seabirds (glaucous gull Larus hyperboreus, Iceland gull Larus glaucoides, common murre Uria aalge and thick-billed murre Uria lomvia) using a UAV and compared censusing techniques to ground photography. An average of 8.5% of murres flew off in...

Data from: Shock and stabilisation following long-term drought in tropical forest from 15 years of litterfall dynamics

Lucy Rowland, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Alex A. R. Oliveira, Samuel S. Almeida, Leandro V. Ferreira, Yadvinder Malhi, Dan B. Metcalfe, Maurizio Mencuccini, John Grace & Patrick Meir
Litterfall dynamics in tropical forests are a good indicator of overall tropical forest function, indicative of carbon invested in both photosynthesising tissues and reproductive organs such as flowers and fruits. These dynamics are sensitive to changes in climate, such as drought, but little is known about the long-term responses of tropical forest litterfall dynamics to extended drought stress. We present a 15-year dataset of litterfall (leaf, flower and fruit, and twigs) from the world's only...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    77

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    77

Affiliations

  • University of Exeter
    77
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • Lund University
    4
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • University of Bath
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Bangor University
    2
  • University of Sussex
    2