6 Works

Data from: Association between integration structure and functional evolution in the opercular four-bar apparatus of the threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus (Pisces: Gasterosteidae)

Heather A. Jamniczky, Emily E. Harper, Rebecca Garner, William A. Cresko, Peter C. Wainwright, Benedikt Hallgrimsson & Charles B. Kimmel
Phenotypes may evolve to become integrated in response to functional demands. Once evolved, integrated phenotypes, often modular, can also influence the trajectory of subsequent responses to selection. Clearly, connecting modularity and functionally adaptive evolution has been challenging. The teleost skull and jaw structures are useful for understanding this connection because of the key roles that these structures play in feeding in novel environments with different prey resources. In the present study, we examined such a...

Data from: Porosity and water vapor conductance of two Troodon formosus eggs an assessment of incubation strategy in a maniraptoran dinosaur

David J. Varricchio, Frankie D. Jackson, Robert A. Jackson & Darla K. Zelenitsky
Using tangential thin sections, we examined variation in porosity and water vapor conductance across two eggs of Troodon formosus, a small (∼50 kg) theropod dinosaur from the North American Upper Cretaceous, testing two hypotheses of egg incubation: (1) full burial within sediments or vegetation and (2) partial burial with exposed upper egg portions. We divided and sampled the eggs in five zones, 1 through 5 from blunt top to more pointed bottom. A geometric model...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of the burying beetles (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Nicrophorinae)

Derek S. Sikes & Chandra Venables
Burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus) are well-known for their monopolization of small vertebrate carcasses in subterranean crypts and complex biparental care behaviors. They have been the focus of intense behavioral, ecological, and conservation research since the 1980s yet no thorough phylogenetic estimate for the group exists. Herein, we infer relationships, test past hypotheses of relationships, and test biogeographic scenarios among 55 of the subfamily Nicrophorinae’s currently valid and extant 72 species. Two mitochondrial genes, COI and...

Data from: Conservation genetics of prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) at the periphery of its distribution range in Peace River, Canada

Stefan Dennenmoser, Arne W. Nolte, Steven M. Vamosi & Sean M. Rogers
Populations at the edge of their range often invoke taxonomic confusion and are increasingly considered to harbour cryptic genetic diversity of significant adaptive potential. In the Peace River region of northwestern Canada, three sculpin species have been reported: spoonhead (Cottus ricei), slimy (Cottus cognatus) and prickly (Cottus asper) sculpin. Prickly sculpin occurrence in this region represents the most eastern edge of its distribution, but its status has remained uncertain following its initial discovery in 1989....

Data from: Reproductive aging patterns in primates reveal that humans are distinct

Susan C. Alberts, Jeanne Altmann, Diane K. Brockman, Marina Cords, Linda M. Fedigan, Anne Pusey, Tara S. Stoinski, Karen B. Strier, William F. Morris & Anne M. Bronikowski
Women rarely give birth after approximately 45 years of age, and they experience the cessation of reproductive cycles – menopause – at approximately 50 years of age, after a fertility decline lasting almost two decades. Such reproductive senescence in mid-lifespan is an evolutionary puzzle of enduring interest because it should be inherently disadvantageous. Further, comparative data on reproductive senescence from other primates, or indeed other mammals, remains relatively rare. Here we carried out the first...

Data from: The diet of Myotis lucifugus across Canada: assessing foraging quality and diet variability

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Hugh Broders, François Fabianek, Erin E. Frazer, Alistair MacKenzie, Andrew Boughen, Rachel Hamilton, Craig K. R. Willis, Felix Martinez-Nuñez, Allyson K. Menzies, Kaleigh J. O. Norquay, Mark Brigham, Joseph Poissant, Jody Rintoul, Robert M. R. Barclay, Jesika P. Reimer & Erin E. Fraser
Variation in prey resources influences the diet and behaviour of predators. When prey become limiting, predators may travel farther to find preferred food or adjust to existing local resources. When predators are habitat limited, local resource abundance impacts foraging success. We analysed the diet of Myotis lucifugus (little brown bats) from Nova Scotia (eastern Canada) to the Northwest Territories (north-western Canada). This distribution includes extremes of season length and temperature and encompasses colonies on rural...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Calgary
    6
  • Columbia University
    1
  • Duke University
    1
  • Saint Mary's University
    1
  • University of North Carolina
    1
  • Institute of Primate Research
    1
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1
  • Queen Mary University of London
    1
  • University of Oregon
    1