6 Works

Primer biases in the molecular assessment of diet in multiple insectivorous mammals

Samuel Browett, Thomas Curran, Denise O'Meara, Andrew Harrington, Naiara Guimarães Sales, Rachael Antwis, David O'Neill & Allan McDevitt
Our understanding of trophic interactions of small insectivorous mammals has been drastically improved with the advent of DNA metabarcoding. The technique has continued to be optimised over the years, with primer choice repeatedly being a vital factor for dietary inferences. However, the majority of dietary studies examining the effect of primer choice often rely on in silico analyses or comparing between species that occupy an identical niche type. Here we apply DNA metabarcoding to empirically...

Genetic evidence further elucidates the history and extent of badger introductions from Great Britain into Ireland

Adrian Allen, Jimena Guerrero, Andrew Byrne, John Lavery, Eleanor Presho, Emily Courcier, James O'Keeffe, Ursula Fogarty, Richard Delahay, Gavin Wilson, Chris Newman, Christina Buesching, Matthew Silk, Denise O'Meara, Robin Skuce, Roman Biek & Robbie A. McDonald
The colonization of Ireland by mammals, has been the subject of extensive study using genetic methods, and forms a central problem in understanding the phylo-geography of European mammals after the Last Glacial Maximum. Ireland exhibits a de-pauperate mammal fauna relative to Great Britain and continental Europe, and a range of natural and anthropogenic processes have given rise to its modern fauna. Previous Europe-wide surveys of the European badger (Meles meles) have found conflicting microsatellite and...

A comparison of density estimation methods for monitoring marked and unmarked animal populations

Joshua Twining, Ben Augustine, David Tosh, Denise O'Meara, Claire McFarlane, Marina Reyne, Sarah Helyar & Ian Montgomery
These data were generated to compare different methods of estimating population density from marked and unmarked animal populations. We compare conventional live trapping with two more modern, non-invasive field methods of population estimation: genetic fingerprinting from hair-tube sampling and camera trapping for the European pine marten (Martes martes). We used arrays of camera traps, live traps, and hair tubes to collect the relevant data in the Ring of Gullion in Northern Ireland. We apply marked...

Data from: Citizen science reveals unexpected continental-scale evolutionary change in a model organism

Jonathan Silvertown, Laurence Cook, Robert Cameron, Mike Dodd, Kevin McConway, Jenny Worthington, Peter Skelton, Christian Anton, Oliver Bossdorf, Bruno Baur, Menno Schilthuizen, Benoît Fontaine, Helmut Sattmann, Giorgio Bertorelle, Maria Correia, Cristina Oliveira, Beata Pokryszko, Małgorzata Ożgo, Arturs Stalažs, Eoin Gill, Üllar Rammul, Péter Sólymos, Zoltan Féher & Xavier Juan
Organisms provide some of the most sensitive indicators of climate change and evolutionary responses are becoming apparent in species with short generation times. Large datasets on genetic polymorphism that can provide an historical benchmark against which to test for recent evolutionary responses are very rare, but an exception is found in the brown-lipped banded snail (Cepaea nemoralis). This species is sensitive to its thermal environment and exhibits several polymorphisms of shell colour and banding pattern...

Data from: The enemy of my enemy is my friend: native pine marten recovery reverses the decline of the red squirrel by suppressing grey squirrel populations

Emma Sheehy, Chris Sutherland, Catherine O'Reilly & Xavier Lambin
Shared enemies may instigate or modify competitive interactions between species. The dis-equilibrium caused by non-native species introductions has revealed that the outcome of such indirect interactions can often be dramatic. However, studies of enemy mediated competition mostly consider the impact of a single enemy, despite species being embedded in complex networks of interactions. Here we demonstrate that native red and invasive grey squirrels in Britain, two terrestrial species linked by resource and disease-mediated apparent competition,...

Data from: The population and landscape genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) in Ireland.

Jimena Guerrero, Andrew W. Byrne, John Lavery, Eleanor Breadon, Gavin Kelly, Emily A. Courcier, James O'Keefe, Ursula Fogarty, Denise B. O'Meara, Dennis Ensing, Carl McCormick, Roman Biek, Robin A. Skuce, Adrian R. Allen & James O'Keeffe
The population genetic structure of free-ranging species is expected to reflect landscape-level effects. Quantifying the role of these factors and their relative contribution often has important implications for wildlife management. The population genetics of the European badger (Meles meles) have received considerable attention, not least because the species acts as a potential wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Britain and Ireland. Herein, we detail the most comprehensive population and landscape genetic study of the...

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