17 Works

Data from: Metabolic rate associates with, but does not generate covariation between, behaviours in western stutter-trilling crickets, Gryllus integer

Indrikis A. Krams, Petri T. Niemelä, Giedrius Trakimas, Ronalds Krams, Gordon M. Burghardt, Tatjana Krama, Aare Kuusik, Marika Mand, Markus J. Rantala, Raivo Mand, Jukka Kekäläinen, Ilkka Sirkka, Severi Luoto, Raine Kortet & Indrikis Krams
The causes and consequences of among-individual variation and covariation in behaviours are of substantial interest to behavioural ecology, but the proximate mechanisms underpinning this (co)variation are still unclear. Previous research suggests metabolic rate as a potential proximate mechanism to explain behavioural covariation. We measured the resting metabolic rate (RMR), boldness and exploration in western stutter-trilling crickets, Gryllus integer, selected differentially for short and fast development over two generations. After applying mixed-effects models to reveal the...

Data from: Elucidating mechanisms for insect body size: partial support for the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting hypothesis

Sami Mikael Kivelä, Sonja Viinamäki, Netta Keret, Karl Gotthard, Esa Hohtola & Panu Välimäki
Body size is a key life history trait and knowledge of its mechanistic basis is crucial in life history biology. Such knowledge is accumulating in holometabolous insects, whose growth is characterised and body size affected by moulting. According to the oxygen-dependent induction of moulting (ODIM) hypothesis, moult is induced at a critical mass where oxygen demand of growing tissues overrides the supply that principally grows only at moults. Support for the ODIM hypothesis is controversial...

Data from: Insulin-like growth factor 1 and life-history evolution of passerine birds

Jaanis Lodjak, Raivo Mand & Marko Mägi
1. Natural selection has generated a diversity of ways in which vertebrates allocate their resources between fundamental life-history traits. The availability of possible evolutionary trajectories of these traits is limited by various genetic, physiological, and phylogenetic constraints. This causes trade-offs due to shared resource pools for, or genetic linkage of, competing traits. The majority of these trade-offs are mediated by hormones and create the variability of phenotypes that can be observed in nature. 2. Insulin-like...

Data from: Potential contributions of root decomposition to the nitrogen cycle in arctic forest and tundra

Sabrina Träger, Ann Milbau & Scott D. Wilson
1. Plant contributions to the nitrogen (N) cycle from decomposition are likely to be altered by vegetation shifts associated with climate change. Roots account for the majority of soil organic matter input from vegetation, but little is known about differences between vegetation types in their root contributions to nutrient cycling. Here, we examine the potential contribution of fine roots to the N cycle in forest and tundra to gain insight into belowground consequences of the...

Data from: Microbiome symbionts and diet diversity incur costs on the immune system of insect larvae

Indrikis Krams, Sanita Kecko, Priit Jõers, Giedrius Trakimas, Didzis Elferts, Ronalds Krams, Severi Luoto, Markus J. Rantala, Inna Inashkina, Dita Gudrā, Dāvids Fridmanis, Jorge Contreras-Garduño, Lelde Grantiņa-Ieviņa & Tatjana Krama
Communities of symbiotic microorganisms that colonize the gastrointestinal tract play an important role in food digestion and protection against opportunistic microbes. Diet diversity increases the number of symbionts in the intestines, a benefit that is considered to impose no cost for the host organism. However, less is known about the possible immunological investments that hosts have to make in order to control the infections caused by symbiont populations that increase due to diet diversity. By...

Data from: Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

Dmitry Shungin, Wei Q. Deng, Tibor V. Varga, Jian'an Luan, Evelin Mihailov, Andres Metspalu, Andrew P. Morris, Nita G. Forouhi, Cecilia Lindgren, Patrik K. E. Magnusson, Nancy L. Pedersen, Göran Hallmans, Audrey Y. Chu, Anne E. Justice, Mariaelisa Graff, Thomas W. Winkler, Lynda M. Rose, Claudia Langenberg, L. Adrienne Cupples, Paul M. Ridker, Nicholas J. Wareham, Ken K. Ong, Ruth J. F. Loos, Daniel I. Chasman, Erik Ingelsson … & Paul W. Franks
Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may reflect underlying gene-environment (G·E) or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between variance effects (Pv), G·E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity), and marginal genetic effects (Pm). Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ=0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ=0.236 for BMI) compared...

Data from: Genome-wide meta-analysis of sciatica in Finnish population

Susanna Lemmelä, Svetlana Solovieva, Rahman Shiri, Christian Benner, Markku Heliövaara, Johannes Kettunen, Verneri Anttila, Samuli Ripatti, Markus Perola, Ilkka Seppälä, Markus Juonala, Mika Kähönen, Veikko Salomaa, Jorma Viikari, Olli Raitakari, Terho Lehtimäki, Aarno Palotie, Eira Viikari-Juntula, Kirsti Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Olli T. Raitakari & Eira Viikari-Juntura
Sciatica or the sciatic syndrome is a common and often disabling low back disorder in the working-age population. It has a relatively high heritability but poorly understood molecular mechanisms. The Finnish population is a genetic isolate where small founder population and bottleneck events have led to enrichment of certain rare and low frequency variants. We performed here the first genome-wide association (GWAS) and meta-analysis of sciatica. The meta-analysis was conducted across two GWAS covering 291...

Data from: Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Tomas Roslin, Bess Hardwick, Vojtech Novotny, William K. Petry, Nigel R. Andrew, Ashley Asmus, Isabel C. Barrio, Yves Basset, Andrea Larissa Boesing, Timothy C. Bonebrake, Erin K. Cameron, Wesley Dáttilo, David A. Donoso, Pavel Drozd, Claudia L. Gray, David S. Hik, Sarah J. Hill, Tapani Hopkins, Shuyin Huang, Bonny Koane, Benita Laird-Hopkins, Liisa Laukkanen, Owen T. Lewis, Sol Milne, Isaiah Mwesige … & Eleanor M. Slade
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latitude and elevation were driven by arthropod predators, with no systematic...

Data from: Plant traits determine the phylogenetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities

Álvaro López-García, Sara Varela-Cervero, Martti Vasar, Maarja Öpik, Jose Miguel Barea & Concepción Azcón-Aguilar
Functional diversity in ecosystems has traditionally been studied using aboveground plant traits. Despite the known effect of plant traits on the microbial community composition, their effects on the microbial functional diversity are only starting to be assessed. In this study, the phylogenetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal communities associated to plant species differing in life cycle and growth form, i.e. plant life forms, was determined to unravel the effect of plant traits on the...

Data from: Relatedness with plant species in native community influences ecological consequences of range expansions

Kadri Koorem, Olga Kostenko, L. Basten Snoek, Carolin Weser, Kelly S. Ramirez, Rutger A. Wilschut & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Global warming is enabling many plant species to expand their range to higher latitudes and altitudes, where they may suffer less from natural aboveground and belowground enemies. Reduced control by natural enemies can enable climate warming-induced range expanders to get an advantage in competition with natives and become disproportionally abundant in their new range. However, so far studies have examined individual growth of range expanders, which have common congeneric plant species in their new range....

Data from: Crosstalk between growth and somatic maintenance in young animals

Jaanis Lodjak & Marko Magi
Growing animals face allocation problems whenever receiving suboptimal amounts of resources in very stochastic natural environments, possibly through a trade-off between growth and somatic maintenance. However, the extent to which such a trade-off exists has remained an open question. We used an insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) injection treatment in free-living pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings to see how IGF-1 levels mediate the development of an antioxidant phenotype via glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Our study showed...

Data from: Carotenoid coloration is related to fat digestion efficiency in a wild bird

Christina Madonia, Pierce Hutton, Mathieu Giraudeau & Tuul Sepp
Some of the most spectacular visual signals found in the animal kingdom are based on dietarily derived carotenoid pigments (which cannot be produced de novo), with a general assumption that carotenoids are limited resources for wild organisms, causing trade-offs in allocation of carotenoids to different physiological functions and ornamentation. This resource trade-off view has been recently questioned, since the efficiency of carotenoid processing may relax the trade-off between allocation toward condition or ornamentation. This hypothesis...

Data from: Niche differentiation and expansion of plant species are associated with mycorrhizal symbiosis

Maret Gerz, C. Guillermo Bueno, Wim A. Ozinga, Martin Zobel & Mari Moora
Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread association between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, which is thought to contribute to plant niche differentiation and expansion. However, this has so far not been explicitly tested. To address the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis on plants’ realized niches, we addressed how mycorrhizal status (i.e. the frequency of occurrence of mycorrhizal symbiosis), flexibility (i.e. the ability to grow both with and without mycorrhizal symbiosis) and type of a plant species affect...

Data from: Improved demethylation in ecological epigenetic experiments: testing a simple and harmless foliar demethylation application

Javier Puy, Hana Dvořáková, Carlos P. Carmona, Francesco De Bello, Inga Hiiesalu & Vitek Latzel
1. Experimental demethylation of plant DNA enables testing for epigenetic effects in a simple and straightforward way without the use of expensive and laborious DNA sequencing. Plants are commonly demethylated during their germination with the application of agents such as 5-azacytidine (5-azaC). However, this approach can cause unwanted effects such as underdeveloped root systems and high mortality of treated plants, hindering a full comparison with untreated plants, and can be applied only on plant reproducing...

Data from: The evolution of male-biased sexual size dimorphism is associated with increased body size plasticity in males

Patrick T. Rohner, Tiit Teder, Toomas Esperk, Stefan Lüpold & Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
1.Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) can vary drastically across environments, demonstrating pronounced sex-specific plasticity. In insects, females are usually the larger and more plastic sex. However, the shortage of taxa with male-biased SSD hampers the assessment of whether the greater plasticity in females is driven by selection on size or represents an effect of the female reproductive role. Here we specifically address the role of sex-specific plasticity of body size in the evolution of SSD reversals...

Data from: Specificity of fungal associations of Pyroleae and Monotropa hypopitys during germination and seedling development

Veronika A Johansson, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Urmas Köljalg & Ove Eriksson
Mycoheterotrophic plants obtain organic carbon from associated mycorrhizal fungi, fully or partially. Angiosperms with this form of nutrition possess exceptionally small 'dust seeds' which after germination develop 'seedlings' that remain subterranean for several years, fully dependent on fungi for supply of carbon. Mycoheterotrophs which as adults have photosynthesis thus develop from full to partial mycoheterotrophy, or autotrophy, during ontogeny. Mycoheterotrophic plants may represent a gradient of variation in a parasitism-mutualism continuum, both among and within...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Tartu
    17
  • University of Turku
    4
  • University of Eastern Finland
    2
  • Lund University
    2
  • Daugavpils University
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice
    2
  • University of Auckland
    2
  • University of Helsinki
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2