4 Works

Data from: Physiological and ecological drivers of early spring blooms of a coastal phytoplankter

Kristen R. Hunter-Cevera, Michael G. Neubert, Robert J. Olson, Andrew R. Solow, Alexi Shalapyonok & Heidi M. Sosik
Climate affects the timing and magnitude of phytoplankton blooms that fuel marine food webs and influence global biogeochemical cycles. Changes in bloom timing have been detected in some cases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, contributing to uncertainty in long-term predictions of climate change impacts. Here we describe a 13-year hourly time series from the New England shelf of data on the coastal phytoplankter Synechococcus, during which the timing of its spring bloom varied by...

Data from: Sex differences and allee effects shape the dynamics of sex-structured invasions

Allison K. Shaw, Hanna Kokko & Michael G. Neubert
The rate at which a population grows and spreads can depend on individual behaviour and interactions with others. In many species with two sexes, males and females differ in key life history traits (e.g. growth, survival, dispersal), which can scale up to affect population rates of growth and spread. In sexually reproducing species, the mechanics of locating mates and reproducing successfully introduce further complications for predicting the invasion speed (spread rate), as both can change...

Data from: The genomic landscape of rapid repeated evolutionary adaptation to toxic pollution in wild fish

Noah M. Reid, Dina A. Proestou, Bryan W. Clark, Wesley C. Warren, John K. Colbourne, Joseph R. Shaw, Sibel I. Karchner, Mark E. Hahn, Diane Nacci, Marjorie F. Oleksiak, Douglas L. Crawford & Andrew Whitehead
Atlantic killifish populations have rapidly adapted to normally lethal levels of pollution in four urban estuaries. Through analysis of 384 whole killifish genome sequences and comparative transcriptomics in four pairs of sensitive and tolerant populations, we identify the aryl hydrocarbon receptor–based signaling pathway as a shared target of selection. This suggests evolutionary constraint on adaptive solutions to complex toxicant mixtures at each site. However, distinct molecular variants apparently contribute to adaptive pathway modification among tolerant...

Data from: Singing whales generate high levels of particle motion: implications for acoustic communication and hearing?

T. Aran Mooney, Maxwell B. Kaplan & Marc O. Lammers
Acoustic signals are fundamental to animal communication, and cetaceans are often considered bioacoustic specialists. Nearly all studies of their acoustic communication focus on sound pressure measurements, overlooking the particle motion components of their communication signals. Here we characterized the levels of acoustic particle velocity (and pressure) of song produced by humpback whales. We demonstrate that whales generate acoustic fields that include significant particle velocity components that are detectable over relatively long distances sufficient to play...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    4
  • VA Office of Research and Development
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • University of Zurich
    1
  • Agricultural Research Service
    1
  • University of Birmingham
    1
  • Miami University
    1
  • University of California, Davis
    1