93 Works

Data from: Estimation of effective population size in continuously distributed populations: there goes the neighborhood

Maile C. Neel, Kevin McKelvey, Robin S. Waples, Nils Ryman, Michael W. Lloyd, Ruth Short Bull, Fred W. Allendorf & Michael K. Schwartz
Use of genetic methods to estimate effective population size (N^e) is rapidly increasing, but all approaches make simplifying assumptions unlikely to be met in real populations. In particular, all assume a single, unstructured population, and none has been evaluated for use with continuously distributed species. We simulated continuous populations with local mating structure, as envisioned by Wright's concept of neighborhood size (NS), and evaluated performance of a single-sample estimator based on linkage disequilibrium (LD), which...

Data from: Historical species distribution models predict species limits in western Plethodon salamanders

Tara A. Pelletier, Charlie Crisafulli, Steve Wagner, Amanda J. Zellmer & Bryan C. Carstens
Allopatry is commonly used to predict boundaries in species delimitation investigations under the assumption that currently allopatric distributions are indicative of reproductive isolation; however, species ranges are known to change over time. Incorporating a temporal perspective of geographic distributions should improve species delimitation; to explore this, we investigate three species of western Plethodon salamanders that have shifted their ranges since the end of the Pleistocene. We generate species distribution models (SDM) of the current range,...

Data from: Are exotic plants more abundant in the introduced versus native range?

Dean E. Pearson, Özkan Eren, Yvette K. Ortega, Diego Villarreal, Muhyettin Şentürk, Florencia M. Miguel, Miguel C. Weinzettel, Aníbal Prina & José L. Hierro
Many invasion hypotheses postulate that introducing species to novel environments allows some organisms to escape population controls within the native range to attain higher abundance in the introduced range. However, introductions may also allow inherently successful species access to new regions where they may flourish without increasing in abundance. To examine these hypotheses, we randomly surveyed semi-arid grasslands in the native and two introduced ranges (12,000-21,000 km2 per range) to quantify local abundance (mean cover...

GenBank 16S rDNA Sequences for Ca. Annandia pinicola, Ca. Gillettellia cooleyia, Ca. Hartigia pinicola, Ca. Profftia spp., Ca. Pseudomonas adelgestsugas from Taiwan, and Ca. Vallotia spp.

Carol von Dohlen, Usha Spaulding, Kistie B. Patch, Kathryn Weglarz, Robert G. Foottit, Nathan P. Havill & Gaelen R. Burke
The attached .csv file contains accession number, definition, and GenBank URL for 28 rDNA sequences: MF077637–MF077640 and MF098761 (‘Ca. Annandia pinicola’), MF077633–MF077636 (‘Ca. Gillettellia cooleyia’), MF077641–MF077645 (‘Ca. Hartigia pinicola’), MF108835-MF108838 (‘Ca. Profftia spp.’), MF098762 (‘Ca. Pseudomonas adelgestsugas from Taiwan), MF063340- MF063348 (‘Ca. Vallotia spp.’).

Data from: A cross-continental comparison of plant and beetle responses to retention of forest patches during timber harvest

Susan C. Baker, Charles B. Halpern, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Christel Kern, Graham J. Edgar, Russell J. Thomson, Richard E. Bigley, Jerry F. Franklin, Kamal J.K. Gandhi, Lena Gustafsson, Samuel Johnson, Brian J. Palik, Thomas A. Spies, E. Ashley Steel, Jan Weslien, Joachim Strengbom & Kamal J. K. Gandhi
Timber harvest can adversely affect forest biota. Recent research and application suggest that retention of mature forest elements (‘retention forestry’), including unharvested patches (or ‘aggregates’) within larger harvested units, can benefit biodiversity compared to clearcutting. However, it is unclear whether these benefits can be generalized among the diverse taxa and biomes in which retention forestry is practiced. Lack of comparability in methods for sampling and analysing responses to timber harvest and edge creation presents a...

Data from: A gene for an extended phenotype

Kelli Hoover, Michael Grove, Matthew Gardner, David P. Hughes, James McNeil & James Slavicek
Manipulation of host behavior by parasites and pathogens has been widely observed but the basis for these behaviors has remained elusive. Gypsy moths infected by a baculovirus climb to the top of trees to die, liquefy, and “rain” virus on the foliage below to infect new hosts. The viral gene that manipulates climbing behavior of the host was identified, providing evidence of a genetic basis for the extended phenotype.

Data from: Range-wide multilocus phylogeography of the red fox reveals ancient continental divergence, minimal genomic exchange, and distinct demographic histories

Mark J. Statham, Zhenghuan Wang, Carl D. Soulsbury, Jan Janecka, Benjamin N. Sacks, Keith B. Aubry, Oliver Berry, Ceiridwen J. Edwards & James Murdoch
Widely distributed taxa provide an opportunity to compare biogeographic responses to climatic fluctuations on multiple continents and to investigate speciation. We conducted the most geographically and genomically comprehensive study to date of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), the world's most widely distributed wild terrestrial carnivore. Analyses of 697 bp of mitochondrial sequence in ~1000 individuals suggested an ancient Middle Eastern origin for all extant red foxes and a 400 kya (SD = 139 kya) origin...

Data from: Quantifying climate sensitivity and climate-driven change in North American amphibian communities

David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Erin Muths, Staci M. Amburgey, Michael J. Adams, Maxwell B. Joseph, J. Hardin Waddle, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maureen E. Ryan, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Daniel L. Calhoun, Courtney L. Davis, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Sam S. Cruickshank, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Carola A. Haas, Ward Hughson, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price … & Brent H. Sigafus
Changing climate will impact species’ ranges only when environmental variability directly impacts the demography of local populations. However, measurement of demographic responses to climate change has largely been limited to single species and locations. Here we show that amphibian communities are responsive to climatic variability, using >500,000 time-series observations for 81 species across 86 North American study areas. The effect of climate on local colonization and persistence probabilities varies among eco-regions and depends on local...

Data from: Functional form and interactions of the drivers of understory non-native plant invasions in northern US forests

Marina Golivets, Christopher W. Woodall & Kimberly F. Wallin
1. The number and rate of non-native plant invasions in forests have been steadily increasing over the last century with profound consequences for the composition, structure and functioning of these ecosystems. While multiple regional, landscape and local environmental factors are known to drive the spread of non-native invasive plant species (NNIPS) into forests, such factors have rarely been analysed within a unified analytical framework allowing for the assessment of their relative importance, possible nonlinear behaviour,...

Data from: Passive acoustic monitoring effectively detects Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls over a range of forest conditions

Leila S. Duchac, Damon B. Lesmeister, Katie M. Dugger, Zachary J. Ruff & Raymond J. Davis
Passive acoustic monitoring using autonomous recording units (ARUs) is a fast-growing area of wildlife research especially for rare, cryptic species that vocalize. Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) populations have been monitored since the mid-1980s using mark-recapture methods. To evaluate an alternative survey method, we used ARUs to detect calls of Northern Spotted Owls and Barred Owls (S. varia), a congener that has expanded its range into the Pacific Northwest and threatens Northern Spotted Owl...

Data from: A changing climate is snuffing out post-fire recovery in montane forests

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Mike Battaglia, Marin Chambers, Paula Fornwalt, Zachary Holden, Thomas Kolb, Jessica Ouzts & Monica Rother
Aim: Climate warming is increasing fire activity in many of Earth’s forested ecosystems. Because fire is an important catalyst for change, investigation of post-fire vegetation response is crucial for understanding the potential for future conversions from forest to non-forest vegetation types. To better understand effects of wildfire and climate warming on forest recovery, we assessed the extent to which climate and terrain influence spatiotemporal variation in past and future post-fire tree regeneration. Location: Montane forests,...

Supplemental data to \"Estimating the Genetic Diversity of Pacific salmon and trout using Multi-gene eDNA Metabarcoding\"

Kevin Weitemier, Brooke E. Penaluna, Laura Hauck, Lucas J. Longway, Tiffany Garcia & Richard Cronn
This dataset contains DNA sequence data of Oncorhynchus species, isolated from environmental DNA (eDNA) from Pacific Northwest streams via microfluidic eDNA metabarcoding and high-throughput (Ilummina) sequencing (samples collected from 2017-09-22 to 2017-10-10). It is accompanied by scripts and commands for data analyses including: sequence denoising, calculation of entropy values by codon position, and calculation of diversity statistics and haplotype mapping. Intermediate outputs include denoised haplotypes, entropy calculations, and haplotype summaries following chimera removal.

Keithly Fire Fuel and Fuel Consumption

, Andrew T. Hudak, Joseph C. Restaino, Michael Billmire, Nancy H. F. French, Roger D. Ottmar, Bridget Hass, Kyle Zarzana, Tristan Goulden & Rainer Volkamer
Data Overview Mapped attributes: Fuel consumption derived from ALS data Post-fire fuel load derived from ALS data Pre-fire fuel load derived from ALS data Fuel consumption derived from FCCS data Post-fire fuel load derived from FCCS data Pre-fire fuel load derived from FCCS data Supplements: ALS data extent Keithly fire perimeter Keithly AOI fire perimeter Description Landscape scale estimates of pre-fire fuel load and fuel consumption are valuable resources for land managers and scientists. We...

Zooplankton in Upper Willamette Reservoirs, 2015

Christina Murphy, Amanda Pollock, Angela Strecker & Sherri Johnson
Samples targeting crustacean zooplankton were collected from 3 upper Willamette Basin reservoirs during May-August 2015. Van Dorn sampling devices were used to collect samples at discrete depths from Fall Creek Reservoir, Lookout Point Reservoir, and Hills Creek Reservoir. Zooplankton samples were collected during daytime and nighttime corresponding with the new moon phase to evaluate zooplankton diel migration in these reservoirs. Zooplankton were visually identified using a microscope and the quantity found at each depth was...

Data from: Capture enrichment of aquatic environmental DNA: a first proof of concept

Taylor M. Wilcox, Katherine E. Zarn, Maxine P. Piggott, Michael K. Young, Kevin S. McKelvey & Michael K. Schwartz
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling – the detection of genetic material in the environment to infer species presence – has rapidly grown as a tool for sampling aquatic animal communities. A potentially powerful feature of environmental sampling is that all taxa within the habitat shed DNA and so may be detectable, creating opportunity for whole-community assessments. However, animal DNA in the environment tends to be comparatively rare, making it necessary to enrich for genetic targets from...

Data from: Regional variation in Caribbean dry forest tree species composition

Janet Franklin, Julie Ripplinger, Ethan H. Freid, Humfredo Marcano-Vega & David W. Steadman
How does tree species composition vary in relation to geographical and environmental gradients in a globally rare tropical/subtropical broadleaf dry forest community in the Caribbean? We analyzed data from 153 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), along with 42 plots that we sampled in the Bahamian Archipelago (on Abaco and Eleuthera Islands). FIA data were collected using published protocols. In the Bahamian Archipelago, we recorded terrain...

Data from: Post‐independence mortality of juveniles is driven by anthropogenic hazards for two passerines in an urban landscape

Solny A. Adalsteinsson, Jeffrey J. Buler, Jacob L. Bowman, Vincent D'Amico, Zachary S. Ladin & W. Gregory Shriver
Urban environments impose novel selection pressures with varying impacts across species and life history stages. The post‐fledging stage for migratory passerines, defined as the period of time from when hatch‐year birds fledge until their first migration, is a poorly understood component of annual productivity that potentially limits population growth. We studied two migratory passerines with positive and negative population responses to urbanization, respectively: Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) and Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). Our goals were...

Data from: Depletion of heterogeneous source species pools predicts future invasion rates

Andrew M. Liebhold, Eckehard G. Brockerhoff & Mark Kimberley
Predicting how increasing rates of global trade will result in new establishments of potentially damaging invasive species is a question of critical importance to the development of national and international policies aimed at minimizing future invasions. Centuries of historical movement and establishment of invading species may have depleted the supply of species available for future invasions, and it has been suggested that the problem of invasions will diminish as a result of this. However, the...

Wildfires and climate change push low-elevation forests across a critical climate threshold for tree regeneration

Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Philip E. Higuera, Zachary A. Holden, Thomas T. Veblen, Monica T. Rother, Sean A. Parks, Anna Sala & Marco P. Maneta
Climate change is increasing fire activity in the western United States, which has the potential to accelerate climate-induced shifts in vegetation communities. Wildfire can catalyze vegetation change by killing adult trees that could otherwise persist in climate conditions no longer suitable for seedling establishment and survival. Recently documented declines in postfire conifer recruitment in the western United States may be an example of this phenomenon. However, the role of annual climate variation and its interaction...

Juvenile survival of a burned forest specialist in response to variation in fire characteristics

Andrew Stillman, Teresa Lorenz, Philip Fischer, Rodney Siegel, Robert Wilkerson, Matthew Johnson & Morgan Tingley
1. Pyrodiversity, defined as variation in fire history and characteristics, has been shown to catalyze post-fire biodiversity in a variety of systems. However, the demographic and behavioral mechanisms driving the responses of individual species to pyrodiversity remain largely unexplored. 2. We used a model post-fire specialist, the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus), to examine the relationship between fire characteristics and juvenile survival while controlling for confounding factors. 3. We radio-tracked fledgling black-backed woodpeckers in burned forests...

Genome-scale phylogeography resolves the native population structure of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky)

Mingming Cui, Yunke Wu, Marion Javal, Isabelle Giguère, Géraldine Roux, Jose Andres, Melody Keena, Juan Shi, Baode Wang, Evan Braswell, Scott Pfister, Richard Hamelin, Amanda Roe & Ilga Porth
Human assisted movement has allowed the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky)) to spread beyond its native range and become a globally regulated invasive pest. Within its native range of China and the Korean peninsula, human-mediated dispersal has also caused cryptic translocation of insects, resulting in population structure complexity. Previous studies used genetic methods to detangle this complexity but were unable to clearly delimit native populations which is needed to develop downstream biosurveillance tools....

Conditional natal dispersal provides a mechanism for populations tracking resource pulses after fire

Andrew Stillman, Teresa Lorenz, Rodney Siegel, Robert Wilkerson, Matthew Johnson & Morgan Tingley
Animals that persist in spatially structured populations face the challenge of tracking the rise and fall of resources across space and time. To combat these challenges, theory predicts that species should use conditional dispersal strategies that allow them to emigrate from patches with declining resources and colonize new resource patches as they appear. We studied natal dispersal movements in the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus), a species known for its strong association with recent post-fire forests...

Limited increases in savanna carbon stocks over decades of fire suppression

Yong Zhou, Jenia Singh, John Butnor, Corli Coetsee, Peter Boucher, Madelon Case, Evan Hockridge, Andrew Davies & Carla Staver
Savannas cover a fifth of the land surface and contribute a third of terrestrial net primary production, accounting for three quarters of global area burned and over half of global fire-driven carbon emissions. Fire suppression and afforestation have been proposed as tools to increase carbon sequestration in these ecosystems. A robust quantification of whole-ecosystem carbon storage in savannas is lacking, however, especially under altered fire regimes. Here, we provide the first direct estimates of whole-ecosystem...

Genetic diversity in the threatened freshwater mussel Lampsilis powellii

Ashley Walters, Kristina Taynor & David Berg
North America is home to the greatest share of the world’s freshwater mussel diversity; however, over 70% of its ~300 species are endangered or threatened. Lampsilis powellii, the Arkansas Fatmucket, is endemic to Arkansas and now restricted to upstream reaches of the Ouachita and Saline rivers, but the species is declining within this small range. Conservation actions such as augmenting or reintroducing populations may be necessary, but they require knowledge of the distribution of genetic...

Litter decomposition rates across tropical montane and lowland forests are controlled foremost by climate

Rebecca Ostertag, Carla Restrepo, Iveren Abeim, Roxana Aragón, Michelle Ataroff, Hazel Chapman, Belen Fadrique, Grizelle González, Achim Häger, Jürgen Homeier, Luis Daniel Llambí, Rikke Reese Næsborg, Laura Nohemy Poma López, Jorge Andrés Ramirez Correa, Klara Scharnagl, Conrado Tobón, James W. Dalling, Patrick H. Martin, Iveren Abiem, Shin‐Ichiro Aiba, Esteban Alvarez‐Dávila, Augusta Y. Cueva‐Agila, Romina D. Fernández, Sybil G. Gotsch, Carlos Iñiguez‐Armijos … & Cameron B. Williams
The “hierarchy of factors” hypothesis states that decomposition rates are controlled primarily by climatic, followed by biological and soil variables. Tropical montane forests (TMF) are globally important ecosystems, yet there have been limited efforts to provide a biome-scale characterization of litter decomposition. We designed a common litter decomposition experiment replicated in 23 tropical montane sites across the Americas, Asia, and Africa and combined these results with a previous study of 23 sites in tropical lowland...

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