8 Works

Data from: Are exotic plants more abundant in the introduced versus native range?

Dean E. Pearson, Özkan Eren, Yvette K. Ortega, Diego Villarreal, Muhyettin Şentürk, Florencia M. Miguel, Miguel C. Weinzettel, Aníbal Prina & José L. Hierro
Many invasion hypotheses postulate that introducing species to novel environments allows some organisms to escape population controls within the native range to attain higher abundance in the introduced range. However, introductions may also allow inherently successful species access to new regions where they may flourish without increasing in abundance. To examine these hypotheses, we randomly surveyed semi-arid grasslands in the native and two introduced ranges (12,000-21,000 km2 per range) to quantify local abundance (mean cover...

Data from: Depletion of heterogeneous source species pools predicts future invasion rates

Andrew M. Liebhold, Eckehard G. Brockerhoff & Mark Kimberley
Predicting how increasing rates of global trade will result in new establishments of potentially damaging invasive species is a question of critical importance to the development of national and international policies aimed at minimizing future invasions. Centuries of historical movement and establishment of invading species may have depleted the supply of species available for future invasions, and it has been suggested that the problem of invasions will diminish as a result of this. However, the...

Data from: Plant water potential improves prediction of empirical stomatal models

William R. L. Anderegg, Stephen Pacala, John S. Sperry, Brendan Choat, Daniel J. Chmura, Thomas Kolb, Frederick Meinzer, Pilar Pita, Víctor Resco De Dios & Brett T. Wolfe
Climate change is expected to lead to increases in drought frequency and severity, with deleterious effects on many ecosystems. Stomatal responses to changing environmental conditions form the backbone of all ecosystem models, but are based on empirical relationships and are not well-tested during drought conditions. Here, we use a dataset of 34 woody plant species spanning global forest biomes to examine the effect of leaf water potential on stomatal conductance and test the predictive accuracy...

Data from: Predicting forest insect flight activity: a Bayesian network approach

Stephen M. Pawson, Owen G. Woodberry & Bruce G. Marcot
Daily flight activity patterns of forest insects are influenced by temporal and meteorological conditions. Temperature and time of day are frequently cited as key drivers of activity; however, complex interactions between multiple contributing factors have also been proposed. Here, we report individual Bayesian network models to assess the probability of flight activity of three exotic insects, Hylurgus ligniperda, Hylastes ater, and Arhopalus ferus in a managed plantation forest context. Models were built from 7,144 individual...

Data from: Big biology meets microclimatology: Defining thermal niches of ectotherms at landscape scales for conservation planning

Daniel J. Isaak, Seth J. Wenger & Michael K. Young
Temperature profoundly affects ecology, a fact ever more evident as the ability to measure thermal environments increases and global changes alter these environments. The spatial structure of thermalscapes is especially relevant to the distribution and abundance of ectothermic organisms but the ability to describe biothermal relationships at extents and grains relevant to conservation planning has been limited by small or sparse datasets. Here, we combine a large occurrence database of >23,000 aquatic species surveys with...

Data from: Deer-mediated changes in environment compound the direct impacts of herbivory on understory plant communities

Autumn E. Sabo, Katie L. Frerker, Donald M. Waller & Eric L. Kruger
1. In forests of eastern North America, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) can directly affect, via herbivory, the presence, abundance, and reproductive success of many plant species. In addition, deer indirectly influence understory communities by altering environmental conditions. 2. To examine how deer indirectly influence understory plants via environmental modification, we sampled vegetation and environmental variables in- and outside deer exclosures (10-20 years old) located in temperate forests in northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of...

Data from: Chaparral bird community responses to prescribed fire and shrub removal in three management seasons

Erica A. Newman, Jennifer B. Potts, Morgan W. Tingley, Charles Vaughn & Scott L. Stephens
Chaparral, a type of shrubland common throughout the California Floristic Province, is subject to management and removal in regions where wildfire threatens human lives and property. Management practices include conducting prescribed burns outside of the historical fire season and employing mechanical fuel reduction (mastication). As the wildland–urban interface grows, particularly in coastal California, more of this ecosystem is subject to active management. To understand the ecological implications of current California chaparral fire management practices, we...

Data from: Dynamic occupancy modeling reveals a hierarchy of competition among fishers, grey foxes, and ringtails

David S. Green, Sean M. Matthews, Robert C. Swiers, Richard L. Callas, J. Scott Yaeger, Stuart L. Farber, Michael K. Schwartz & Roger A. Powell
1. Determining how species coexist is critical for understanding functional diversity, niche partitioning and interspecific interactions. Identifying the direct and indirect interactions among sympatric carnivores that enable their coexistence are particularly important to elucidate because they are integral for maintaining ecosystem function. 2. We studied the effects of removing 9 fishers (Pekania pennanti) on their population dynamics and used this perturbation to elucidate the interspecific interactions among fishers, grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and ringtails (Bassariscus...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • US Forest Service
    8
  • Scion
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Northern Research Station
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • Institute of Dendrology
    1
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    1