64 Works

Data from: Breaking the cipher: ant eavesdropping on the variational trail pheromone of its termite prey

Xiao-Lan Wen, Ping Wen, Cecilia A. L. Dahlsjӧ, David Sillam-Dussès & Jan Šobotník
Predators may eavesdrop on their prey using innate signals of varying nature. In regards to social prey, most of the prey signals are derived from social communication and may therefore be highly complex. The most efficient predators select signals that provide the highest benefits. Here, we showed the use of eusocial prey signals by the termite-raiding ant Odontoponera transversa. O. transversa selected the trail pheromone of termites as kairomone in several species of fungus-growing termites...

Data from: Population-specific responses to an invasive species

Martin Reichard, Karel Douda, Mirosław Przybyłski, Oana P. Popa, Eva Karbanová, Klára Matasová, Kateřina Rylková, Matej Polačik, Radim Blažek & Carl Smith
Predicting the impacts of non-native species remains a challenge. As populations of a species are genetically and phenotypically variable, the impact of non-native species on local taxa could crucially depend on population-specific traits and adaptations of both native and non-native species. Bitterling fishes are brood parasites of unionid mussels and unionid mussels produce larvae that parasitize fishes. We used common garden experiments to measure three key elements in the bitterling–mussel association among two populations of...

Data from: Towards a better understanding of the Chenopodium album aggregate (Amaranthaceae) in the Middle East: a karyological, cytometric and morphometric investigation

Farzaneh Habibi, Petr Vit, Mohammadreza Rahiminejad & Bohumil Mandak
The study of variation in nuclear genome size, especially when combined with common garden experiments, significantly contributes to disentangling interspecies relationships within taxonomically complicated plant groups. The Chenopodium album aggregate is among the morphologically most variable groups and consists of many weakly differentiated cosmopolitan entities. We analysed nuclear genome size variation in diploid and polyploid species of the aggregate from Iran using flow cytometry of 282 accessions from 88 populations of 7 species. To this...

Data from: Response of mountain Picea abies forests to stand-replacing bark beetle outbreaks: neighbourhood effects lead to self-replacement

Thorsten Zeppenfeld, Miroslav Svoboda, Robert Justin DeRose, Marco Heurich, Jörg Müller, Pavla Čížková, Martin Starý, Radek Bače & Daniel C. Donato
1. Large, severe disturbances drive many forest ecosystems over the long term, but pose management uncertainties when human experience with them is limited. Recent continent-scale outbreaks of bark beetles across the temperate Northern Hemisphere have raised major concerns as to whether coniferous forests will regenerate back towards pre-outbreak condition and meet possible reforestation objectives. To date, however, analyses of post-outbreak regeneration across broad spatial and temporal scales have been rare, and entirely lacking for many...

Interplay of above- and belowground resource limitations: a competition-facilitation shift maintains species coexistence

Jan Douda
Forest ecosystems are commonly characterised by a hierarchy of resources. During a disturbance of a forest community, increased light availability in the understorey can support competitive interactions at the expense of facilitation. This may overwhelm the role of belowground resource heterogeneity in maintaining species coexistence and so result in biotic homogenisation of a site. We re-surveyed species composition while estimating interspecific interactions along a microtopographic (moisture) gradient of a temperate swamp forest after increasing the...

What defines insularity for plants in edaphic islands?

Francisco Emmanuel Méndez Castro, Luisa Conti, Milan Chytrý, Borja Jimenez-Alfaro, Michal Hajek, Michal Horsák, David Zeleny, Marco Malavasi & Gianluigi Ottaviani
The Theory of Island Biogeography postulates that size and isolation are key drivers of biodiversity on islands. This theory has been applied not only to true (e.g. oceanic) islands but also to terrestrial island-like systems (e.g. edaphic islands). Recently, a debate has opened as to whether terrestrial island-like systems function like true islands. However, identifying the effect of insularity in terrestrial systems is conceptually and methodologically challenging because recognizing species source(s) and measuring isolation is...

Eiders, nutrients and eagles: Bottom-up and top-down population dynamics in a marine bird_dataset

Federico Morelli, Karsten Laursen, Marek Svitok, Yanina Benedetti & Anders Pape Møller
The main objective of this long-term study (1978-2016) was to find the underlying factors behind the declining trends of eider Somateria mollissima in the Baltic/Wadden Sea. Specifically, we aimed at quantifying the bottom-up effect of nutrients, through mussel stocks, on reproduction and abundance of eider, and the top-down effects caused by white-tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla predation. Bottom-up effects increase marine primary productivity with subsequent effects on food availability for a major mussel predator. Top-down effects...

Data from: Disturbance history is a key driver of tree lifespan in temperate primary forests

Jakob Pavlin, Thomas A. Nagel, Marek Svitok, Joseph L. Pettit, Krešimir Begović, Stjepan Mikac, Abdulla Dikku, Elvin Toromani, Momchil Panayotov, Tzvetan Zlatanov, Ovidiu Haruta, Sorin Dorog, Oleh Chaskovskyy, Martin Mikoláš, Pavel Janda, Michal Frankovič, Ruffy Rodrigo, Ondřej Vostarek, Michal Synek, Martin Dušátko, Tomáš Kníř, Daniel Kozák, Ondrej Kameniar, Radek Bače, Vojtěch Čada … & Miroslav Svoboda
AIMS We examined differences in lifespan among the dominant tree species (spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.), fir (Abies alba Mill.), beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), and maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.)) across primary mountain forests of Europe. We ask how disturbance history, lifetime growth patterns, and environmental factors influence lifespan. LOCATIONS Balkan mountains, Carpathian mountains, Dinaric mountains. METHODS Annual ring widths from 20,600 cores from primary forests were used to estimate tree life spans, growth trends,...

Expanding the mutualistic niche: parallel symbiont turnover along climatic gradients

Gregor Rolshausen, Uwe Hallman, Francesco Dal Grande, Juergen Otte, Kerry Knudsen & Imke Schmitt
Keystone mutualisms, such as corals, lichens, or mycorrhizae sustain fundamental ecosystem functions. Range dynamics of these symbioses are, however, inherently difficult to predict because host species may switch between different symbiont partners in different environments, thereby altering the range of the mutualism as a functional unit. Biogeographic models of mutualisms thus have to consider both, the ecological amplitudes of various symbiont partners, and the abiotic conditions that trigger symbiont replacement. To address this challenge, we...

Data from: The evolution of male-biased sexual size dimorphism is associated with increased body size plasticity in males

Patrick T. Rohner, Tiit Teder, Toomas Esperk, Stefan Lüpold & Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
1.Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) can vary drastically across environments, demonstrating pronounced sex-specific plasticity. In insects, females are usually the larger and more plastic sex. However, the shortage of taxa with male-biased SSD hampers the assessment of whether the greater plasticity in females is driven by selection on size or represents an effect of the female reproductive role. Here we specifically address the role of sex-specific plasticity of body size in the evolution of SSD reversals...

Data from: Earthworms affect growth and competition between ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants

Jan Frouz, Jabbar Moradi, David Püschel & Jana Rydlová
Previous research showed that during intermediate stages of primary succession, when vegetation is dominated by ectomycorrhizal (EcM) shrubs and trees, site colonization by earthworms substantially alters plant communities. Research has also shown that EcM shrubs and trees suppress arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants in the understory. To determine whether earthworm activity reduces this asymmetric competition, we conducted a full factorial laboratory experiment in which we grew EcM Betula pendula and AM Tripleurospermum inodorum, together or apart,...

Data from: Vertical root distribution of individual species in a mountain grassland community: does it respond to neighbours?

Tomas Herben, Tereza Vozábová, Věra Hadincová, František Krahulec, Hana Mayerová, Sylvie Pecháčková, Hana Skálová & Karol Krak
1.Vertical differentiation in root placement is one of the potential mechanisms of plant niche differentiation. It can be due to the remarkable plasticity of roots in response to nutrients and neighbours, but most data on it come from pot or garden experiments. The roles of vertical differentiation and of plasticity in it in the field are thus not well known. 2.We examined species-specific root vertical distribution in a montane grassland using quantitative Real-Time PCR. We...

Data from: Higher genetic diversity in recolonized areas than in refugia of Alnus glutinosa triggered by continent-wide lineage admixture

Alena Havrdová, Jan Douda, Karol Krak, Petr Vít, Věroslava Hadincová, Petr Zákravský & Bohumil Mandák
Genetic admixture is supposed to be an important trigger of species expansions because it can create the potential for selection of genotypes suitable for new climatic conditions. Up until now, however, no continent-wide population genetic study has performed a detailed reconstruction of admixture events during natural species expansions. To fill this gap, we analysed the postglacial history of Alnus glutinosa, a keystone species of European swamp habitats, across its entire distribution range using two molecular...

Data from: Recovery of large carnivores in Europe’s modern human-dominated landscapes

Guillaume Chapron, Petra Kaczensky, John D. C. Linnell, Manuela Von Arx, Djuro Huber, Henrik Andrén, José Vicente López-Bao, Michal Adamec, Francisco Álvares, Ole Anders, Linas Balčiauskas, Vaidas Balys, Péter Bedő, Ferdinand Bego, Juan Carlos Blanco, Urs Breitenmoser, Henrik Brøseth, Luděk Bufka, Raimonda Bunikyte, Paolo Ciucci, Alexander Dutsov, Thomas Engleder, Christian Fuxjäger, Claudio Groff, Katja Holmala … & Luigi Boitani
The conservation of large carnivores is a formidable challenge for biodiversity conservation. Using a data set on the past and current status of brown bears (Ursus arctos), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), gray wolves (Canis lupus), and wolverines (Gulo gulo) in European countries, we show that roughly one-third of mainland Europe hosts at least one large carnivore species, with stable or increasing abundance in most cases in 21st-century records. The reasons for this overall conservation success...

Data from: Taxonomic revision of genus Ablattaria Reitter (Coleoptera, Silphidae) employing geometric morphometrics

Jarin Qubaiová, Jan Růžička & Hana Šípková
The genus Ablattaria Reitter, 1884 (Coleoptera: Silphidae: Silphinae) is revised. Four taxa are recognized as valid species: Ablattaria arenaria (Kraatz, 1876), A. cribrata (Ménétries, 1832), A. laevigata (Fabricius, 1775) and A. subtriangula Reitter, 1905. Ablattaria laevigata var. meridionalis Ganglbauer, 1899 is newly treated as a junior subjective synonym of A. laevigata. Lectotypes are designated for Phosphuga arenaria Kraatz, 1876, Ablattaria arenaria var. punctigera Reitter, 1884, Ablattaria arenaria var. alleoni Portevin, 1926, Silpha cribrata Ménétries, 1832,...

Data from: Evolutionary potential in the Alpine: trait heritabilities and performance variation of the dwarf willow Salix herbacea from different elevations and microhabitats

Janosch Sedlacek, Andrés J. Cortés, Julia Wheeler, Oliver Bossdorf, Guenter Hoch, Jaroslav Klápště, Christian Lexer, Christian Rixen, Sonja Wipf, Sophie Karrenberg & Mark Van Kleunen
Alpine ecosystems are seriously threatened by climate change. One of the key mechanisms by which plants can adapt to changing environmental conditions is through evolutionary change. However, we still know little about the evolutionary potential in wild populations of long-lived alpine plants. Here, we investigated heritabilities of phenological traits, leaf size, and performance traits in natural populations of the long-lived alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea using relatedness estimates inferred from SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) markers....

Biometric conversion factors as a unifying platform for comparative assessment of invasive freshwater bivalves

Neil Coughlan, Eoghan Cunningham, Ross Cuthbert, Patrick Joyce, Pedro Anastacio, Filipe Banha, Nicolás Bonel, Stephanie Bradbeer, Elizabeta Briski, Vincent Butitta, Zuzana Čadková, Jaimie Dick, Karel Douda, Lawrence Eagling, Noé Ferreira-Rodríguez, Leandro Hünicken, Mattias Johansson, Louise Kregting, Anna Labecka, Deliang Li, Florencia Liquin, Jonathan Marescaux, Todd Morris, Patrycja Nowakowska, Małgorzata Ożgo … & Francisco Sylvester
1. Invasive bivalves continue to spread and negatively impact freshwater ecosystems worldwide. As different metrics for body size and biomass are frequently used within the literature to standardise bivalve related ecological impacts (e.g. respiration and filtration rates), the lack of broadly applicable conversion equations currently hinders reliable comparison across bivalve populations. To facilitate improved comparative assessment amongst studies originating from disparate geographic locations, we report body size and biomass conversion equations for six invasive freshwater...

Mind the outgroup and bare branches in total-evidence dating: a case study of Pimpliform Darwin Wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae)

Tamara Spasojevic, Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, Masato Ito, Stanislav Korenko, Seraina Klopfstein, Gavin R. Broad & Martin Schwarz
Taxon sampling is a central aspect of phylogenetic study design, but it has received limited attention in the context of total-evidence dating, a widely used dating approach that directly integrates molecular and morphological information from extant and fossil taxa. We here assess the impact of commonly employed outgroup sampling schemes and missing morphological data in extant taxa on age estimates in a total-evidence dating analysis under the uniform tree prior. Our study group is Pimpliformes,...

Population history explains the performance of an annual herb - within and beyond its European species range

Jan Douda, Jana Doudová, Eva Hodková, Petr Vít, Karol Krak & Bohumil Mandák
1. The centre-periphery hypothesis (CPH) predicts a decrease in population performance from the centre of the species range towards the edge, hindering further species expansion. To overcome ecological limitation, local adaptation of peripheral populations is assumed necessary to extend niche space and thus to potentially facilitate species’ range expansion. However, adaptive changes do not necessarily correspond to current ecological marginality. Instead, population history may provide a fuller context for understanding patterns of local adaptation within...

Moths and butterflies on alien shores – global biogeography of non-native Lepidoptera

Richard Mally, Rebecca M. Turner, Rachael E. Blake, Gyda Fenn-Moltu, Cleo Bertelsmeier, Eckehard G. Brockerhoff, Robert J. B. Hoare, Helen F. Nahrung, Alain Roques, Deepa S. Pureswaran, Takehiko Yamanaka & Andrew M. Liebhold
Lepidoptera is a highly diverse, predominantly herbivorous insect order, with species transported to outside their native range largely facilitated by the global trade of plants and plant-based goods. Analogous to island disharmony, we examine invasion disharmony, where species filtering during invasions increases systematic compositional differences between native and non-native species assemblages, and test whether some families are more successful at establishing in non-native regions than others. We compared numbers of non-native, unintentionally introduced Lepidoptera species...

Termite dispersal is influenced by their diet

Simon Hellemans, Jan Šobotník, Gilles Lepoint, Martin Mihaljevič, Yves Roisin & Thomas Bourguignon
Termites feed on vegetal matter at various stages of decomposition. Lineages of wood- and soil-feeding termites are distributed across terrestrial ecosystems located between 45°N and 45°S of latitude, a distribution they acquired through many transoceanic dispersal events. While wood-feeding termites often live in the wood on which they feed and are efficient at dispersing across oceans by rafting, soil-feeders are believed to be poor dispersers. Therefore, their distribution across multiple continents requires an explanation. Here,...

Longitudinal evidence for immunosenescence and inflammaging in free-living great tits

Martin Těšický, Tereza Krajzingrová, Zuzana Świderská, Kamila Syslová, Barbora Bílková, Jiří Eliáš, Hana Velová, Jana Svobodová, Petra Bauerová, Tomáš Albrecht & Vinkler Michal
The first-line effector mechanisms of immune defence, including inflammation and oxidative burst, contribute significantly to host-pathogen resistance. Whether these immune responses undergo age-related changes in birds remains unknown. Here, we tracked selected inflammatory parameters in 54 free-living great tits (Parus major) of known age, captured repeatedly over three consecutive years, with the aims to investigate long-term repeatability and age-dependent changes in cellular oxidative burst responsiveness upon in vitro stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and to...

Data from: Fine scale waterbody data improve prediction of waterbird occurrence despite coarse species data

Petra Šímová, Vítězslav Moudrý, Jan Komárek, Karel Hrach & Marie-Josée Fortin
While modelling habitat suitability and species distribution, ecologists must deal with issues related to the spatial resolution of species occurrence and environmental data. Indeed, given that the spatial resolution of species and environmental datasets range from centimeters to hundreds of kilometers, it underlines the importance of choosing the optimal combination of resolutions to achieve the highest possible modelling prediction accuracy. We evaluated how the spatial resolution of land cover/waterbody datasets (meters to 1 km) affect...

Data from: Impact of male condition on his spermatophore and consequences for female reproductive performance in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Anne Duplouy, Luisa Woestmann, Juan Gallego-Zamorano, Marjo Saastamoinen & Juan Gallego Zamorano
In butterflies, male reproductive success is highly related to the quality and the size of the spermatophore transferred to the female. The spermatophore is a capsule produced by the male during copulation, which in many species contains sperm in addition to a nuptial gift, and which is digested by the female after copulation. The nuptial gift may contribute to egg production and offspring quality, and in some cases also to female body maintenance. The production...

Data from: The local impact of macrofauna and land-use intensity on soil nutrient concentration and exchangeability in lowland tropical Peru

Cecilia A. L. Dahlsjö, Petr Stiblik, Jana Jaklová, Matěj Zídek, Juan Wicman Huaycama, Bohdan Lojka & Jakub Houška
Agricultural expansion is a major driver of deforestation which has negative consequences for biodiversity and stability. While sustainable farming is known to be beneficial for biodiversity and crop resilience, little is known about the impact of macrofauna and land-use intensity on soil quality. In this study, we examine the relative effects of (1) soil macrofauna and (2) land-use (primary forest, agroforestry, annual crop) on element depletion rates, concentration, and exchangeability in standardised soil. We used...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    6
  • 2021
    14
  • 2020
    9
  • 2019
    4
  • 2018
    6
  • 2017
    7
  • 2016
    5
  • 2015
    9
  • 2014
    3
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64

Affiliations

  • Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
    64
  • Charles University
    11
  • Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
    7
  • Technical University of Zvolen
    6
  • University of Zagreb
    3
  • University of Ostrava
    3
  • Ukrainian National Forestry University
    3
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Oviedo
    2