70 Works

Data from: Bacterial cooperation causes systematic errors in pathogen risk assessment due to the failure of the independent action hypothesis

Daniel M. Cornforth, Andrew Matthews, Sam P. Brown & Ben Raymond
The Independent Action Hypothesis (IAH) states that pathogenic individuals (cells, spores, virus particles etc.) behave independently of each other, so that each has an independent probability of causing systemic infection or death. The IAH is not just of basic scientific interest; it forms the basis of our current estimates of infectious disease risk in humans. Despite the important role of the IAH in managing disease interventions for food and water-borne pathogens, experimental support for the...

Data from: Near-stasis in the long-term diversification of Mesozoic tetrapods

Roger B. J. Benson, Richard J. Butler, John Alroy, Philip D. Mannion, Matthew T. Carrano & Graeme T. Lloyd
How did evolution generate the extraordinary diversity of vertebrates on land? Zero species are known prior to ~380 million years ago, and more than 30,000 are present today. An expansionist model suggests this was achieved by large and unbounded increases, leading to substantially greater diversity in the present than at any time in the geological past. This model contrasts starkly with empirical support for constrained diversification in marine animals, suggesting different macroevolutionary processes on land...

Data from: Redesigning the ‘choice architecture’ of hospital prescription charts: a mixed methods study incorporating in-situ simulation

Dominic King, Ali Jabbar, Esmita Charani, Colin Bicknell, Zhe Wu, Gavin Miller, Mark Gilchrist, Ivo Vlaev, Bryony Dean Franklin & Ara Darzi
Objectives: To incorporate behavioural insights into the user-centred design of an inpatient prescription chart (Imperial Drug Chart Evaluation and Adoption Study, IDEAS chart) and to determine whether changes in the content and design of prescription charts could influence prescribing behaviour and reduce prescribing errors. Design: A mixed-methods approach was taken in the development phase of the project; in situ simulation was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the newly developed IDEAS prescription chart. Setting: A...

Data from: Epidemiological interactions between urogenital and intestinal human schistosomiasis in the context of praziquantel treatment across three West African countries

Sarah C. L. Knowles, Bonnie L. Webster, Amadou Garba, Moussa Sacko, Oumar T. Diaw, Alan Fenwick, David Rollinson & Joanne P. Webster
Background: In many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis co-occur, and mixed species infections containing both Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni can be common. During co-infection, interactions between these two species are possible, yet the extent to which such interactions influence disease dynamics or the outcome of control efforts remains poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we analyse epidemiological data from three West African countries co-endemic for urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis (Senegal, Niger and...

Streptorubin atropisomer

Henry Rzepa
(S)-Streptorubin dimer, calculated optical rotation

Foo

Matthew Harvey

Google

Matthew Harvey

Henry Rzepa's blog: Chemistry with a twist

Henry Rzepa

chemdraw test

Matthew Harvey
my first chemdraw submission

chemdraw test

Matthew Harvey
my first chemdraw submission

chemdraw test

Matthew Harvey
my first chemdraw submission

chemdraw

Matthew Harvey
chemdraw

The mechanism of diazo coupling to indoles

Henry Rzepa
Kinetic deuterium isotope effects for the diazocoupling to 2,4-substituted indoles for substituents R=H, t-butyl, methyl.

Data from: Evolution of resource use along a gradient of stress leads to increased facilitation

Diane Lawrence & Timothy G. Barraclough
The stress-gradient hypothesis (SGH) posits that the relative importance of facilitative interactions versus negative interactions increases as levels of abiotic stress increase. Originally formulated in empirical studies of plant populations, in recent years the SGH has been found to describe how interactions change in response to stress in a wide range of species including algae, mussels and moths. However, there has been little theory attempting to predict patterns from first principles in relation to different...

Data from: Population genomic datasets describing the post-vaccine evolutionary epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Nicholas J. Croucher, Jonathan A. Finkelstein, Steven I. Pelton, Julian Parkhill, Stephen D. Bentley, William P. Hanage & Marc Lipsitch
Streptococcus pneumoniae is common nasopharyngeal commensal bacterium and important human pathogen. Vaccines against a subset of pneumococcal antigenic diversity have reduced rates of disease, without changing the frequency of asymptomatic carriage, through altering the bacterial population structure. These changes can be studied in detail through using genome sequencing to characterise systematically-sampled collections of carried S. pneumoniae. This dataset consists of 616 annotated draft genomes of isolates collected from children during routine visits to primary care...

Data from: Disentangling the ‘brown world’ faecal-detritus interaction web: dung beetle effects on soil microbial properties

Eleanor M. Slade, Tomas Roslin, Minna Santalahti & Thomas Bell
Many ecosystem services are sustained by the combined action of microscopic and macroscopic organisms, and shaped by interactions between the two. However, studies tend to focus on only one of these two components. We combined the two by investigating the impact of macrofauna on microbial community composition and functioning in the context of a major ecosystem process: the decomposition of dung. We compared bacterial communities of pasture soil and experimental dung pats inhabited by one...

Data from: A supermatrix phylogeny of corvoid passerine birds (Aves: Corvides)

Knud Andreas Jønsson, Pierre-Henri Fabre, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Ben G. Holt, Michael K. Borregaard, Carsten Rahbek & Jon Fjeldså
The Corvides (previously referred to as the core Corvoidea) are a morphologically diverse clade of passerine birds comprising nearly 800 species. The group originated some 30 million years ago in the proto-Papuan archipelago, to the north of Australia, from where lineages have dispersed and colonized all of the world’s major continental and insular landmasses (except Antarctica). During the last decade multiple species-level phylogenies have been generated for individual corvoid families and more recently the inter-familial...

Data from: A novel respiratory architecture in the Silurian mollusc Acaenoplax

Christopher D. Dean, Mark D. Sutton, Derek J. Siveter & David J. Siveter
Extant aplacophorans, a group of shell-less vermiform molluscs, respire through appendages within or projecting from a posterior cavity. Respiratory structures differ between the subclasses Caudofoveata (ctenidia within the cavity) and Solenogastres (folds of the mantle itself). Acaenoplax hayae, a Silurian vermiform mollusc from the Herefordshire Lagerstätte, England, exhibits characteristics of both these groups. While recent work places it within the crown group Aplacophora, near the caudofoveates, initial observations suggested that its respiratory structures were closer...

Data from: Plant-soil feedbacks from 30-year family-specific soil cultures: phylogeny, soil chemistry and plant life stage

Zia Mehrabi, Owen T. Lewis & Thomas Bell
Intraspecific negative feedback effects, where performance is reduced on soils conditioned by conspecifics, are widely documented in plant communities. However, interspecific feedbacks are less well studied, and their direction, strength, causes, and consequences are poorly understood. If more closely related species share pathogens, or have similar soil resource requirements, plants may perform better on soils conditioned by more distant phylogenetic relatives. There have been few empirical tests of this prediction across plant life stages, and...

Data from: Multicellular group formation in response to predators in the alga Chlorella vulgaris

Roberta M. Fisher, Tom Bell & Stuart A. West
A key step in the evolution of multicellular organisms is the formation of cooperative multicellular groups. It has been suggested that predation pressure may promote multicellular group formation in some algae and bacteria, with cells forming groups to lower their chance of being eaten. We use the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and the protist Tetrahymena thermophila to test whether predation pressure can initiate the formation of colonies. We found that: (1) either predators or just...

Data from: Preservational bias controls the fossil record of pterosaurs

Christopher D. Dean, Philip D. Mannion & Richard J. Butler
Pterosaurs, a Mesozoic group of flying archosaurs, have become a focal point for debates pertaining to the impact of sampling biases on our reading of the fossil record, as well as the utility of sampling proxies in palaeo-diversity reconstructions. The completeness of the pterosaur fossil specimens themselves potentially provides additional information that is not captured in existing sampling proxies, and might shed new light on the group's evolutionary history. Here we assess the quality of...

Data from: Use of elastic stability analysis to explain the stress-dependent nature of soil strength

Kevin J. Hanley, Catherine O'Sullivan, Mohammad Ahmer Wadee & Xin Huang
The peak and critical state strengths of sands are linearly related to the stress level, just as the frictional resistance to sliding along an interface is related to the normal force. The analogy with frictional sliding has led to the use of a ‘friction angle’ to describe the relationship between strength and stress for soils. The term ‘friction angle’ implies that the underlying mechanism is frictional resistance at the particle contacts. However, experiments and discrete...

Data from: The evolution of morphological diversity in continental assemblages of Passerine birds

Knud Andreas Jønsson, Jean Philippe Lessard, Robert E. Ricklefs & Jean-Philippe Lessard
Understanding geographic variation in the species richness and lineage composition of regional biotas is a long standing goal in ecology. Why do some evolutionary lineages proliferate while others do not, and how do new colonists fit into an established fauna? Here, we analyse the morphological structure of assemblages of passerine birds in four biogeographic regions to examine the relative influence of colonization history and niche-based processes on regional communities of passerine birds. Using morphological traits...

chemdraw test

Matthew Harvey
my first chemdraw submission

chemdraw test

Matthew Harvey
my first chemdraw submission

Registration Year

  • 2015
    70

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    70

Affiliations

  • Imperial College London
    70
  • University of Oxford
    6
  • Natural History Museum
    3
  • University of Birmingham
    2
  • Institut National de Recherche en Santé Publique
    1
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    1
  • University of Sussex
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • National Museums Scotland
    1