24 Works

Data from: Land use change through the lens of macroecology: insights from Azorean arthropods and the Maximum Entropy Theory of Ecology

Micah Brush, Tom Matthews, Paulo Borges & John Harte
Abstract from Brush et al. (2022) Ecography: Human activity and land management practices, in particular land use change, have resulted in the global loss of biodiversity. These types of disturbance affect the shape of macroecological patterns, and therefore analyzing these patterns can provide insights into how ecosystems are affected by land use change. We here use arthropod census data from 96 sites at Terceira Island in the Azores archipelago across four different land uses of...

Data from: Divergent trophic responses to biogeographic and environmental gradients

Miguel G. Matias, Cátia Lúcio Pereira, Pedro Miguel Raposeiro, Vítor Gonçalves, Ana Mafalda Cruz, Ana Cristina Costa & Miguel Bastos Araújo
Following environmental changes, communities disassemble and reassemble in seemingly unpredictable ways. Whether species respond to such changes individualistically or collectively (e.g. as functional groups) is still unclear. To address this question, we used an extensive new dataset for the lake communities in the Azores' archipelago to test whether: 1) individual species respond concordantly within trophic groups; 2) trophic groups respond concordantly to biogeographic and environmental gradients. Spatial concordance in individual species distributions within trophic groups...

Data from: Decreased selectivity during mate choice in a small-sized population of a long-lived seabird

Joël Bried, Malvina Andris, Marie-Pierre Dubois & Philippe Jarne
As biparental care is crucial for breeding success in Procellariiformes seabirds (i.e., albatrosses and petrels), these species are expected to be choosy during pair formation. However, the choice of partners is limited in small-sized populations, which might lead to random pairing. In Procellariiformes, the consequences of such limitations for mating strategies have been examined in a single species. Here, we studied mate choice in another Procellariiforme, Bulwer’s petrel Bulweria bulwerii, in the Azores (ca 70...

Plate boundary deformation at the Azores triple junction determined from continuous GPS geodetic measurements, 2000-2017

João D'Araújo, Freysteinn Sigmundsson, Teresa Ferreira, Jun Okada, Maria Lorenzo & Rita Silva
Ground deformation in the Azores, at the triple junction between the Eurasian, Nubian, and North American plates, has been mapped with continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) geodetic measurements to improve tectonic motion estimates and for understanding volcanic unrest. We compute daily GPS positions, spanning almost 17 years (2000-2017), from 18 continuous GPS stations. The GPS time-series are analyzed by searching for discontinuities and periodic functions. Results show that Flores and Graciosa islands have displacements close...

Data from: Evidence for mega-landslides as drivers of island colonization

Víctor García-Olivares, Heriberto López, Jairo Patiño, Nadir Alvarez, Antonio Machado, Juan Carlos Carrecedo, Vicente Soler, Brent C. Emerson & Juan Carlos Carracedo
Aim: How non-dispersive taxa colonize islands is generalized as being by wind, or rafting, with the implicit assumption that such events involve one (wind) or a few (rafting) individuals. However, because of the evolutionary time-scale for colonization events, the fit of individual species to a conceptual model of wind or rafting is difficult to assess. Here, we describe an alternative testable geological model for inter-island colonization that can result in larger effective founding population sizes...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: An expanded molecular phylogeny of Plumbaginaceae, with emphasis on Limonium (sea lavenders): taxonomic implications and biogeographic considerations

Konstantina Koutroumpa, Spyros Theodoridis, Ben H. Warren, Ares Jiménez, Ferhat Celep, Musa Doğan, Maria M. Romeiras, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, José María Fernández-Palacios, Juli Caujapé-Castells, Mónica Moura, Miguel M. Sequeira, Elena Conti & Miguel Menezes De Sequeira
Plumbaginaceae is characterized by a history of multiple taxonomic rearrangements and lacks a broad molecular phylogenetic framework. Limonium is the most species‐rich genus of the family with ca. 600 species and cosmopolitan distribution. Its center of diversity is the Mediterranean region, where ca. 70% of all Limonium species are endemic. In this study, we sample 201 Limonium species covering all described infrageneric entities and spanning its wide geographic range, along with 64 species of other...

Data from: Polyploidy and microsatellite variation in the relict tree Prunus lusitanica L.: how effective are refugia in preserving genotypic diversity of clonal taxa?

Carlos García-Verdugo, Juan Antonio Calleja, Pablo Vargas, Luis Silva, Orlanda Moreira & Fernando Pulido
Refugia are expected to preserve genetic variation of relict taxa, especially in polyploids, because high gene dosages could prevent genetic erosion in small isolated populations. However, other attributes linked to polyploidy, such as asexual reproduction, may strongly limit the levels of genetic variability in relict populations. Here, ploidy levels and patterns of genetic variation at nuclear microsatellite loci were analysed in Prunus lusitanica, a polyploid species with clonal reproduction that is considered a paradigmatic example...

Data from: Arthropod diversity in a tropical forest

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, François Guilhaumon, Olivier Missa, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Jürgen Schmidl, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jon R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H. C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan … & Maurice Leponce
Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6,144 arthropod species from 0.48 ha and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas...

Speciation in the abyss - genomics and morphology reveal a new species of beaked whale

Emma L. Carroll, Michael R. McGowen, Morgan L. McCarthy, Felix G. Marx, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Merel L. Dalebout, Sascha Dreyer, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Sabine S. Hansen, Anton Van Helden, Aubrie B. Onoufriou, Robin W. Baird, C. Scott Baker, Simon Berrow, Danielle Cholewiak, Diane Claridge, Rochelle Constantine, Nicholas J. Davison, Catarina Eira, R. Ewan Fordyce, John Gatesy, G. J. Greg Hofmeyr, Vidal Martin, James G. Mead, Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni … & Morten T. Olsen
Earth’s deep oceans remains less well understood than the surface of Mars. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the abyss, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, yet their diversity and ecology remain obscure. We combine genomic and morphometric analyses to reveal a new Southern Hemisphere ziphiid species, Ramari’s beaked whale, Mesoplodon eueu, whose name is linked to the Indigenous people of the lands from which the species holotype and...

Data from: Marine regime shifts impact synchrony of deep‐sea fish growth in the Northeast Atlantic

Susanne E. Tanner, Eva Giacomello, Gui M. Menezes, Alice Mirasole, João Neves, Vera Sequeira, Rita P. Vasconcelos, Ana Rita Vieira & John R. Morrongiello
The complexity and spatio–temporal scale of populations’ dynamics influence how populations respond to large-scale ecological pressures. Detecting and attributing synchrony (i.e. temporally coincident fluctuations in populations’ parameters) is key as synchronous populations can become more vulnerable to stochastic events that can affect the viability of harvest and have profound consequences to community structure. Here, we aimed to estimate the level of synchrony in fish growth within and among species across 1 million km2 and identify...

Spider species collected in Macaronesian islands using COBRA sampling protocols

Jagoba Malumbres-Olarte
Aim: Habitat diversity has been linked to the diversity and structure of island communities, however, little is known about patterns and processes within habitats. Here we aim to determine the contributions of habitat type and inferred dispersal frequency to the differences in taxonomic structure between assemblages in the same island habitat. Location: The Macaronesian archipelagos (Azores, Madeira, the Canary Islands and Cabo Verde). Taxon: Spiders (Araneae). Methods: We established forest and dry habitat sites (each...

Dispersal syndromes are poorly associated with climatic niche differences in the Azorean seed plants

María Leo, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Paulo A. V. Borges, Eduardo B. De Azevedo, Rosalina Gabriel, Hanno Schaefer & Ana M. C. Santos
Aim: Environmental niche tracking is linked to the species ability to disperse. While well investigated on large spatial scales, dispersal constraints also influence small-scale processes and may explain the difference between the potential and the realized niche of species at small-scales. Here we test whether niche size and niche fill differ systematically according to dispersal syndrome within isolated oceanic islands. We expect species with higher dispersal abilities (anemochorous or endozoochorous) will have a higher niche...

Data from: Establishment of a coastal fish in the Azores: recent colonisation or sudden expansion of an ancient relict population?

Sergio Stefanni, Rita Castilho, Maria Sala-Bozano, Joana I. Robalo, Sara M. Francisco, Ricardo S. Santos, Nuno Marques, Alberto Brito, Vitor C. Almada & Stefano Mariani
The processes and timescales associated with ocean-wide changes in the distribution of marine species have intrigued biologists since Darwin’s earliest insights into biogeography. The Azores, a mid-Atlantic volcanic archipelago located >1000 km off the European continental shelf, offers ideal opportunities to investigate phylogeographic colonisation scenarios. The benthopelagic sparid fish known as the common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris) is now relatively common along the coastline of the Azores archipelago, but was virtually absent before the 1990s....

Data from: Nest fidelity is driven by multi-scale information in a long-lived seabird

Alexandre Robert, Vítor H. Paiva, Mark Bolton, Frédéric Jiguet & Joël Bried
Although the reproductive success of most organisms depends on factors acting at several spatial scales, little is known about how organisms are able to synthesize multi-scale information to optimize reproduction. Using longitudinal data from a long-lived seabird, Monteiro's storm-petrel, we show that average breeding success is strongly related to oceanic conditions at the population level, and we postulate that (i) individuals use proximal information (their own reproduction outcome in year t) to assess the qualities...

Data from: Living on a volcano's edge: genetic isolation of an extremophile terrestrial metazoan

Luis Cunha, Rafael Montiel, Marta Novo, Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Armindo Rodrigues, A. J. Morgan & Peter Kille
Communities of organisms inhabiting extreme terrestrial environments provide a unique opportunity to study evolutionary forces that drive population structure and genetic diversity under the combined challenges posed by multiple geogenic stressors. High abundance of an invasive pantropical earthworm (and the absence of indigenous lumbricid species) in the Furnas geothermal field (Sao Miguel Island, Azores) indicates its remarkable tolerance to high soil temperature, exceptionally high carbon dioxide and low oxygen levels, and elevated metal bioavailability, conditions...

Data from: Habitat-driven population structure of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, in the North-East Atlantic

Marie Louis, Amélia Viricel, Tamara Lucas, Hélène Peltier, Eric Alfonsi, Simon Berrow, Andrew Brownlow, Pablo Covelo, Willy Dabin, Rob Deaville, Renaud De Stephanis, François Gally, Pauline Gauffier, Rod Penrose, Monica A. Silva, Christophe Guinet & Benoît Simon-Bouhet
Despite no obvious barrier to gene flow, historical environmental processes and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile animals. Ecotypes emerged in several large mammal species as a result of niche specializations and/or social organization. In the North-West Atlantic, two distinct bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) ecotypes (i.e. ‘coastal’ and ‘pelagic’) have been identified. Here, we investigated the genetic population structure of North-East Atlantic (NEA) bottlenose dolphins on a large scale through the...

Data from: Hsp70 protein levels and thermotolerance in Drosophila subobscura: a reassessment of the thermal co-adaptation hypothesis

Gemma Calabria, Olga Dolgova, Carla Rego, Luís E. Castañeda, Enrico L. Rezende, Joan Balanyà, Marta Pascual, Jesper G. Sørensen, Volker Loeschcke & Mauro Santos
Theory predicts that geographic variation in traits and genes associated with climatic adaptation may be initially driven by the correlated evolution of thermal preference and thermal sensitivity. This assumes that an organism’s preferred body temperature corresponds with the thermal optimum in which performance is maximized; hence, shifts in thermal preferences affect the subsequent evolution of thermal-related traits. Drosophila subobscura evolved world-wide latitudinal clines in several traits including chromosome inversion frequencies, with some polymorphic inversions being...

Data from: The Pillars of Hercules as a bathymetric barrier to gene-flow promoting isolation in a global deep-sea shark (Centroscymnus coelolepis)

Diana Catarino, Halvor Knutsen, Ana Veríssimo, Esben Moland Olsen, Per Erik Jorde, Gui Menezes, Hanne Sannæs, David Stanković, Joan Batista Company, Francis Neat, Roberto Danovaro, Antonio Dell'Anno, Bastien Rochowski, Sergio Stefanni, Joan Baptista Company & Hanne Sannaes
Knowledge of the mechanisms limiting connectivity and gene-flow in deep-sea ecosystems is limited, especially for deep-sea sharks. The Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) is a globally distributed and Near Threatened deep-sea shark. C. coelolepis population structure was studied using 11 nuclear microsatellite markers and a 497 bp fragment from the mtDNA Control Region. High levels of genetic homogeneity across the Atlantic (ΦST=-0.0091, FST= 0.0024, P > 0.05) were found suggesting one large population unit at this...

Food talk: 40-Hz fin whale calls are associated with prey biomass

Miriam Romagosa, Sergi Pérez-Jorge, Irma Cascão, Helena Mouriño, Patrick Lehodey, Andreia Pereira, Tiago A. Marques, Luís Matias & Mónica A. Silva
Animals use varied acoustic signals that play critical roles in their lives. Understanding the function of these signals may inform about key life-history processes relevant for conservation. In the case of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus), that produce different call types associated with different behaviours, several hypotheses have emerged regarding call function, but the topic still remains in its infancy. Here, we investigate the potential function of two fin whale vocalizations, the song-forming 20-Hz call and...

Gaps in DNA sequence libraries for Macaronesian marine macroinvertebrates imply decades till completion and robust monitoring

Pedro Vieira, Ana Sofia Lavrador, Manuela Parente, Paola Parretti, Ana Costa, Filipe Costa & Sofia Duarte
Aim: DNA metabarcoding has great potential to improve biomonitoring in island’s marine ecosystems, which are highly vulnerable to global change and non-indigenous species (NIS) introductions. However, the depth and accuracy of the taxonomic identifications are largely dependent on reference libraries containing representative and reliable sequences for the targeted species. In this study, we evaluated the gaps in the availability of DNA sequences and their accuracy, for macroinvertebrates inhabiting Macaronesia’s shallow marine habitats. Location: Macaronesia (Azores,...

Ant taxonomic and functional beta-diversity

Clara Frasconi Wendt, Ana Ceia-Hasse, Alice Nunes, Robin Verble, Giacomo Santini, Mário Boieiro & Cristina Branquinho
The decomposition of beta-diversity (β-diversity) into its replacement (βrepl) and richness (βrich) components in combination with a taxonomic and functional approach, may help to identify processes driving community composition along environmental gradients. We aimed to understand which abiotic and spatial variables influence ant β-diversity and identify which processes may drive ant β-diversity patterns in Mediterranean drylands by measuring the percentage of variation in ant taxonomic and functional β-diversity explained by local environmental, regional climatic and...

Irreproducibility in searches of scientific literature: a comparative analysis

Gabor Pozsgai, Gabor Lövei, Liette Vasseur, Geoff Gurr, Péter Batáry, Janos Korponai, Nick Littlewood, Jian Liu, Arnold Móra, John Obrycki, Olivia Reynolds, Jenni Stockan, Heather VanVolkenburg, Jie Zhang, Wenwu Zhou & Minsheng You
1. Repeatability is the cornerstone of science and it is particularly important for systematic reviews. However, little is known on how researchers’ choice of database and search platform influence the repeatability of systematic reviews. Here, we aim to unveil how the computer environment and the location where the search was initiated from influence hit results. 2. We present a comparative analysis of time-synchronized searches at different institutional locations in the world, and evaluate the consistency...

Predation on Vachellia trees in the Evrona Nature Reserve following an oil spill

Marco Ferrante, Daniella Möller, Gabriella Möller, Esteban Menares, Yael Lubin & Michal Segoli
The Evrona Nature Reserve (southern Israel; 29°40′N, 35°00′E) was affected by two large oil spills in 1975 and 2014, respectively. Between Nov 2019 to Oct 2019, we recorded invertebrate and vertebrate predation rates using the artificial caterpillar method (Howe et al. 2009, Entomol Exp App) in oil-polluted and unpolluted Vachellia trees.

Registration Year

  • 2022
    3
  • 2021
    8
  • 2020
    1
  • 2018
    1
  • 2017
    2
  • 2016
    1
  • 2015
    2
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    1
  • 2012
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of the Azores
    24
  • University of La Laguna
    4
  • University of Lisbon
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • University of Melbourne
    2
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • Griffith University
    2
  • Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales
    2