8 Works

Data from: Combined effects of night warming and light pollution on predator-prey interactions

Colleen R. Miller, Brandon T. Barton, Likai Zhu, Volker C. Radeloff, Kerry M. Oliver, Jason P. Harmon & Anthony R. Ives
Interactions between multiple anthropogenic environmental changes can drive non-additive effects in ecological systems, and the non-additive effects can in turn be amplified or dampened by spatial covariation among environmental changes. We investigated the combined effects of night-time warming and light pollution on pea aphids and two predatory ladybeetle species. As expected, neither night-time warming nor light pollution changed the suppression of aphids by the ladybeetle species that forages effectively in darkness. However, for the more-visual...

Data from: Landscape and environmental influences on Mycobacterium ulcerans distribution among aquatic sites in Ghana

Shannon M. Pileggi, Heather Jordan, Julie A. Clennon, Ellen Whitney, M. Eric Benbow, Richard Merritt, Mollie McIntosh, Ryan Kimbirauskas, Pamela Small, Daniel Boayke, Charles Quaye, Jiaguo Qi, Lindsay Campbell, Jenni Gronseth, Edwin Ampadu, William Opare, Lance Waller, Lance A. Waller & Daniel Boakye
Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is highly endemic in West Africa. While the mode of transmission is unknown, many studies associate Buruli ulcer with different types of water exposure. We present results from the largest study to date to test for M. ulcerans in aquatic sites and identify environmental attributes associated with its presence. Environmental samples from 98 aquatic sites in the Greater Accra, Ashanti, and Volta regions of Ghana were tested for the...

Data from: First discovery of the charophycean green alga Lychnothamnus barbatus (Charophyceae) extant in the New World

Kenneth G. Karol, Paul M. Skawinski, Richard M. McCourt, Michelle E. Nault, Reesa Evans, Martha E. Barton, Matthew S. Berg, Donna J. Perleberg, John Hall & John D. Hall
Premise of the study: Although some species of Characeae, known as stoneworts, can be found on every continent except Antarctica, many species and some genera have limited geographic distributions. The genus Lychnothamnus, represented by a single extant species L. barbatus, was known only from scattered localities in Europe and Australasia until it was recently discovered in North America. Methods: Morphological identifications were made from specimens collected in Minnesota and Wisconsin, U.S.A. DNA sequences were obtained...

Data from: Using citizen science monitoring data in species distribution models to inform isotopic assignment of migratory connectivity in wetland birds

Auriel M.V. Fournier, Kiel L. Drake, Douglas C. Tozer & Auriel M. V. Fournier
Stable isotopes have been used to estimate migratory connectivity in many species. Estimates are often greatly improved when coupled with species distribution models (SDMs), which temper estimates in relation to occurrence. SDMs can be constructed using from point locality data from a variety of sources including extensive monitoring data typically collected by citizen scientists. However, one potential issue with SDM is that these data oven have sampling bias. To avoid this potential bias, an approach...

Data from: Nest survival modeling using a multi-species approach in forests managed for timber and biofuel feedstock

Zachary G. Loman, Adrian P. Monroe, Sam K. Riffell, Darren A. Miller, Francisco J. Vilella, Bradley R. Wheat, Scott A. Rush, James A. Martin & Samuel K. Riffell
1. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) intercropping is a novel forest management practice for biomass production intended to generate cellulosic feedstocks within intensively managed loblolly pine-dominated landscapes. These pine plantations are important for early-successional bird species, as short rotation times continually maintain early successional habitat. We tested the efficacy of using community models compared to individual surrogate species models in understanding influences on nest survival. We analysed nest data to test for differences in habitat use for...

Data from: Direct benefits of choosing a high fitness mate can offset the indirect costs associated with intralocus sexual conflict

Alison Pischedda & Adam K. Chippindale
Intralocus sexual conflict generates a cost to mate choice: high fitness partners transmit genetic variation that confers lower fitness to offspring of the opposite sex. Our earlier work in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, revealed that these indirect genetic costs were sufficient to reverse potential “good genes” benefits of sexual selection. However, mate choice can also confer direct fitness benefits by inducing larger numbers of progeny. Here, we consider whether direct benefits through enhanced fertility...

Data from: Evaluation of mowing frequency on right-of-way plant communities in Mississippi

Edward D. Entsminger, Jeanne C. Jones, John W. Guyton, Bronson K. Strickland & Bruce D. Leopold
Abstract: Native grasses and native wildflowers are declining, especially along roadside right-of-ways due to intensive mowing and herbicide management practices. Roadside right-of-ways undergo regular disturbances such as mowing, maintenance, and road developments that affect soils, groundwater, surface hydrology, and vegetation composition. We investigated species richness and percent coverage within plant communities along highway right-of-ways to determine if reduced mowing increased native plant coverage. The study was conducted using 10 research plots situated along Highway 25...

Data from: Spatial genetic structure in American black bears (Ursus americanus): female philopatry is variable and related to population history

Thea V. Kristensen, Emily E. Puckett, Erin L. Landguth, Jerrold L. Belant, John T. Hast, Colin Carpenter, Jaime L. Sajecki, Jeff Beringer, Myron Means, John J. Cox, Lori S. Eggert, & Kimberly G. Smith
Previously, American black bears (Ursus americanus) were thought to follow the pattern of female philopatry and male-biased dispersal. However, recent studies have identified deviations from this pattern. Such flexibility in dispersal patterns can allow individuals greater ability to acclimate to changing environments. We explored dispersal and spatial genetic relatedness patterns across ten black bear populations—including long established (historic), with known reproduction >50 years ago, and newly established (recent) populations, with reproduction recorded <50 years ago—in...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Mississippi State University
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  • University of Georgia
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  • University of Arkansas System
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  • California Polytechnic State University
    1
  • University of Kansas
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  • University of Montana
    1
  • The Bronx Defenders
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  • West Virginia Division of Natural Resources
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  • Linyi University
    1
  • University of Ghana
    1