3 Works

Data from: Moa diet fits the bill: virtual reconstruction incorporating mummified remains and prediction of biomechanical performance in avian giants

Marie R. G. Attard, Laura A. B. Wilson, Trevor H. Worthy, Paul Scofield, Peter Johnston, William C. H. Parr & Stephen Wroe
The moa (Dinornithiformes) are large to gigantic extinct terrestrial birds of New Zealand. Knowledge about niche partitioning, feeding mode and preference among moa species is limited, hampering palaeoecological reconstruction and evaluation of the impacts of their extinction on remnant native biota, or the viability of exotic species as proposed ecological ‘surrogates'. Here we apply three-dimensional finite-element analysis to compare the biomechanical performance of skulls from five of the six moa genera, and two extant ratites,...

Data from: Geographically contrasting biodiversity reductions in a widespread New Zealand seabird

Nicolas J. Rawlence, Martyn Kennedy, Christian N. K. Anderson, Stefan Prost, Charlotte E. Till, Ian Smith, R. Paul Scofield, Alan J. D. Tennyson, Jill Hamel, Chris Lalas, Elizabeth A. Matisoo-Smith, Jonathan M. Waters & Ian W. G. Smith
Unravelling prehistoric anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity represents a key challenge for biologists and archaeologists. New Zealand's endemic Stewart Island Shag (Leucocarbo chalconotus) comprises two distinct phylogeographic lineages, currently restricted to the country's south and southeast. However, fossil and archaeological remains suggest a far more widespread distribution at the time of Polynesian settlement ca. 1280 AD, encompassing much of coastal South Island. We used modern and ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating, and Bayesian modelling, to assess the...

Data from: A critical evaluation of how ancient DNA bulk bone metabarcoding complements traditional morphological analysis of fossil assemblages

Alicia C. Grealy, Matthew C. McDowell, Paul Scofield, Dáithí C. Murray, Diana A. Fusco, James Haile, Gavin J. Prideaux & Michael Bunce
When pooled for extraction as a bulk sample, the DNA within morphologically unidentifiable fossil bones can, using next-generation sequencing, yield valuable taxonomic data. This method has been proposed as a means to rapidly and cost-effectively assess general ancient DNA preservation at a site, and to investigate temporal and spatial changes in biodiversity; however, several caveats have yet to be considered. We critically evaluated the bulk bone metabarcoding (BBM) method in terms of its: (i) repeatability,...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Canterbury Museum
    3
  • Flinders University
    2
  • University of California System
    1
  • Murdoch University
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • University of New England
    1
  • Curtin University
    1
  • University of Auckland
    1
  • Arizona State University
    1
  • UNSW Sydney
    1