166 Works

Data from: Niche evolution and thermal adaptation in the temperate species Drosophila americana

Neftali Sillero, Micael Reis, Cristina P. Vieira, Jorge Vieira, Ramiro Morales Hojas & R. Morales-Hojas
The study of ecological niche evolution is fundamental for understanding how the environment influences species’ geographical distributions and their adaptation to divergent environments. Here we present a study of the ecological niche, demographic history and thermal performance (locomotor activity, developmental time and fertility/viability) of the temperate species Drosophila americana and its two chromosomal forms. Temperature is the environmental factor that contributes most to the species’ and chromosomal forms’ ecological niches, although precipitation is also important...

Data from: Home loving boreal hare mitochondria survived several invasions in Iberia: the relative roles of recurrent hybridisation and allele surfing

José Melo-Ferreira, Liliana Farelo, Helder Freitas, Franz Suchentrunk, Pierre Boursot & Paulo C. Alves
Genetic introgression from a resident species into an invading close relative can result from repeated hybridisation along the invasion front and/or allele surfing on the expansion wave. Cases where the phenomenon is massive and systematic, such as for hares (genus Lepus) in Iberia, would be best explained by recurrent hybridisation but this is difficult to prove since the donor populations are generally extinct. In the Pyrenean foothills, Lepus europaeus presumably replaced Lepus granatensis recently and...

Data from: Multiple quantitative trait loci influence intra-specific variation in genital morphology between phylogenetically distinct lines of Drosophila montana

Martin A Schäfer, Jarkko Routtu, Jorge Vieira, Anneli Hoikkala, Mike G Ritchie & Christian Schlötterer
The evolution of animal genitalia has gained renewed interest, because of their potential roles during sexual selection and early stages of species formation. Although central to understanding the evolutionary process, knowledge of the genetic basis of natural variation in genital morphology is limited to a very few species. Using an out-bred cross between phylogenetically distinct lines of Drosophila montana, we characterized quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting the size and shape of the distiphallus, a prominent...

Data from: Geographic variation of life-history traits in the sand lizard, Lacerta agilis: testing Darwin's fecundity-advantage hypothesis

Evgeny S. Roitberg, Galina V. Eplanova, Tatiana I. Kotenko, Fèlix Amat, Miguel A. Carretero, Valentina N. Kuranova, Nina A. Bulakhova, Oleksandr I. Zinenko & Vladimir A. Yakovlev
The fecundity-advantage-hypothesis (FAH) explains larger female size relative to male size as a correlated response to fecundity selection. We explored FAH by investigating geographic variation in female reproductive output and its relation to sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in Lacerta agilis, an oviparous lizard occupying a major part of temperate Eurasia. We analysed how sex-specific body size and SSD are associated with two putative indicators of fecundity selection intensity (clutch size and the slope of the...

Data from: Behavioural responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes

Carla Freitas, Esben Moland Olsen, Even Moland, Lorenzo Ciannelli & Halvor Knutsen
Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30–80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a...

Data from: The evolutionary history of the Cape hare (Lepus capensis sensu lato): insights for systematics and biogeography

Sara Lado, Paulo C. Alves, M. Zafarul Islam, José C. Brito & José Melo-Ferreira
Inferring the phylogeography of species with large distributions helps deciphering major diversification patterns that may occur in parallel across taxa. Here, we infer the evolutionary history of the Cape hare, Lepus capensis sensu lato, a species distributed from southern Africa to Asia, by analysing variation at 18 microsatellites and 9 DNA (1 mitochondrial and 8 nuclear) sequenced loci, from field and museum-collected samples. Using a combination of assignment and coalescent-based methods, we show that the...

Data from: Hybridization at an ecotone: ecological and genetic barriers between three Iberian vipers

Pedro Tarroso, Ricardo J. Pereira, Fernando Martínez-Freiría, Raquel Godinho & José Carlos Brito
The formation of stable genetic boundaries between emerging species is often diagnosed by reduced hybrid fitness relative to parental taxa. This reduced fitness can arise from endogenous and/or exogenous barriers to gene flow. Although detecting exogenous barriers in nature is difficult, we can estimate the role of ecological divergence in driving species boundaries by integrating molecular and ecological niche modelling tools. Here, we focus on a three-way secondary contact zone between three viper species (Vipera...

Data from: Validating the use of coloration patterns for individual recognition in the worm pipefish using a novel set of microsatellite markers

Nuno M. Monteiro, Rodolfo M. Silva, Mário Cunha, Agostinho Antunes, Adam G. Jones & Maria N. Vieira
In studies of behaviour, ecology and evolution, identification of individual organisms can be an invaluable tool, capable of unravelling otherwise cryptic information regarding group structure, movement patterns, population size and mating strategies. The use of natural markings is arguably the least invasive method for identification. However, to be truly useful natural markings must be sufficiently variable to allow for unique identification, while being stable enough to permit long-term studies. Non-invasive marking techniques are especially important...

Data from: An annotated draft genome of the mountain hare (Lepus timidus)

João Pedro Marques, Fernando A. Seixas, Jeffrey M. Good, Liliana Farelo, Colin M. Callahan, W. Ian Montgomery, Neil Reid, Paulo C. Alves, Pierre Boursot & José Melo-Ferreira
Hares (genus Lepus) provide clear examples of repeated and often massive introgressive hybridization and striking local adaptations. Genomic studies on this group have so far relied on comparisons to the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) reference genome. Here, we report the first de novo draft reference genome for a hare species, the mountain hare (Lepus timidus), and evaluate the efficacy of whole-genome re-sequencing analyses using the new reference versus using the rabbit reference genome. The genome...

The legacy of recurrent introgression during the radiation of hares

Mafalda S. Ferreira, Matthew R. Jones, Colin M. Callahan, Liliana Farelo, Zelalem Tolesa, Franz Suchentrunk, Pierre Boursot, L. Scott Mills, Paulo C. Alves, Jeffrey M. Good & José Melo-Ferreira
Hybridization may often be an important source of adaptive variation, but the extent and long-term impacts of introgression have seldom been evaluated in the phylogenetic context of a radiation. Hares (Lepus) represent a widespread mammalian radiation of 32 extant species characterized by striking ecological adaptations and recurrent admixture. To understand the relevance of introgressive hybridization during the diversification of Lepus, we analyzed whole exome sequences (61.7 Mb) from 15 species of hares (1- 4 individuals...

Preserving wintering frugivorous birds in agro‐ecosystems under land use change: Lessons from intensive and super-intensive olive orchards

Rui Morgado, Rui Pedroso, Miguel Porto, José Herrera, Francisco Rego, Francisco Moreira & Pedro Beja
Fleshy-fruit production is becoming more intensive worldwide, but how this affects frugivorous birds is poorly known. In the Mediterranean region, intensive and super-intensive olive orchards are fast expanding, potentially affecting millions of wintering songbirds. Here we test the idea that intensification may benefit frugivorous birds, at least locally, due to increased fruit availability, while negatively affecting the wider wintering bird community due to intensive management, structural simplification and landscape homogenisation. We estimated olive abundance and...

Crowding after sudden habitat loss affects demography and social structure in a bat population

Francisco Amorim, Ricardo Pita, Vanessa Mata, Pedro Beja, Hugo Rebelo & Vanessa A. Mata
1. The sudden loss of habitats due to natural or anthropogenic disturbances causes displacement of mobile animals from affected areas to refuge habitats, where large but often transitory concentrations of individuals may occur. While these local density increases have been previously described, the hypothesis that crowding disrupts demographic processes remains largely untested. 2. Here we used the sudden flooding of a river valley by a hydroelectric reservoir as a quasi-experiment to investigate the consequences of...

Perdigão: computational mesh (ALS.NE.80)

Vasco Batista, José Laginha Palma & Vitor Costa Gomes

Perdigão: computational mesh (ALS.SW.40)

Vasco Batista, José Laginha Palma & Vitor Costa Gomes

Perdigão: aerial lidar survey raster map (with buildings)

José Laginha Palma, Vasco Batista & Vitor Costa Gomes

Perdigão: computational mesh (ALS.NE.20)

Vasco Batista, José Laginha Palma & Vitor Costa Gomes

Data from: Endemic species may have complex histories: within-refugium phylogeography of an endangered Iberian vole

Soraia Barbosa, Joana Paupério, Jeremy S. Herman, Clara M. Ferreira, Ricardo Pita, Hélia M. Vale-Gonçalves, João A. Cabral, José A. Garrido-García, Ramón C. Soriguer, Pedro Beja, António Mira, Paulo C. Alves & Jeremy B. Searle
Glacial refugia protected and promoted biodiversity during the Pleistocene, not only at a broader scale, but also for many endemics that contracted and expanded their ranges within refugial areas. Understanding the evolutionary history of refugial endemics is especially important in the case of endangered species to recognise the origins of their genetic structure and thus produce better informed conservation practices. The Iberian Peninsula is an important European glacial refugium, rich in endemics of conservation concern,...

Data from: Starting a DNA barcode reference library for shallow water polychaetes from the southern European Atlantic coast

Jorge Lobo, Marcos A. L. Teixeira, Luisa M. S. Borges, Maria S. G. Ferreira, Claudia Hollatz, Pedro T. Gomes, Ronaldo Sousa, Ascensão Ravara, Maria H. Costa & Filipe O. Costa
Annelid polychaetes have been seldom the focus of dedicated DNA barcoding studies, despite their ecological relevance and often dominance, particularly in soft-bottom estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we report the first assessment of the performance of DNA barcodes in the discrimination of shallow water polychaete species from the southern European Atlantic coast, focusing on specimens collected in estuaries and coastal ecosystems of Portugal. We analysed cytochrome oxidase I DNA barcodes (COI-5P) from 164 specimens,...

Data from: Conflicting evolutionary patterns due to mitochondrial introgression and multilocus phylogeography of the Patagonian freshwater crab Aegla neuquensis

Brian R. Barber, Jiawu Xu, Marcos Pérez-Losada, Carlos G. Jara & Keith A. Crandall
BACKGROUND: Multiple loci and population genetic methods were employed to study the phylogeographic history of the Patagonian freshwater crab Aegla neuquensis (Aeglidae: Decopoda). This taxon occurs in two large river systems in the Patagonian Steppe, from the foothills of the Andes Mountains east to the Atlantic Ocean. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nuclear phylogeny and multilocus nested clade phylogeographic analysis detected a fragmentation event between the Negro and Chico-Chubut river systems. This event occurred approximately 137 thousand...

Data from: Revisiting the Iberian honey bee (Apis mellifera iberiensis) contact zone: maternal and genome-wide nuclear variation provide support for secondary contact from historical refugia

M. Alice Pinto, Julio C. Chávez-Galarza, Dora Henriques, J. Spencer Johnston, Miguel Carneiro, José Rufino & John C. Patton
Dissecting diversity patterns of organisms endemic to Iberia has been truly challenging for a variety of taxa, and the Iberian honey bee is no exception. Surveys of genetic variation in the Iberian honey bee are among the most extensive for any honey bee subspecies. From these, differential and complex patterns of diversity have emerged, which have yet to be fully resolved. Here, we used a genome-wide data set of 309 neutrally tested single nucleotide polymorphisms...

Data from: European wildcat populations are subdivided into five main biogeographic groups: consequences of Pleistocene climate changes or recent anthropogenic fragmentation?

Federica Mattucci, Rita Oliveira, Leslie A. Lyons, Paulo C. Alves & Ettore Randi
Extant populations of the European wildcat are fragmented across the continent, the likely consequence of recent extirpations due to habitat loss and over-hunting. However, their underlying phylogeographic history has never been reconstructed. For testing the hypothesis that the European wildcat survived the Ice Age fragmented in Mediterranean refuges, we assayed the genetic variation at 31 microsatellites in 668 presumptive European wildcats sampled in 15 European countries. Moreover, to evaluate the extent of subspecies/population divergence and...

Data from: Targeted capture and resequencing of 1040 genes reveal environmentally driven functional variation in gray wolves

Rena M. Schweizer, Jacqueline Robinson, Ryan Harrigan, Pedro Silva, Marco Galaverni, Marco Musiani, Richard E. Green, John Novembre & Robert K. Wayne
In an era of ever-increasing amounts of whole genome sequence data for individuals and populations, the utility of traditional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) array-based genome scans is uncertain. We previously performed a SNP array-based genome scan to identify candidate genes under selection in six distinct gray wolf (Canis lupus) ecotypes. Using this information, we designed a targeted capture array for 1040 genes, including all exons and flanking regions, as well as 5000 1 kb non-genic...

Data from: Genome sequencing highlights the dynamic early history of dogs

Adam H. Freedman, Ilan Gronau, Rena M. Schweizer, Diego Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Eunjung Han, Pedro M. Silva, Marco Galaverni, Zhenxin Fan, Peter Marx, Belen Lorente-Galdos, Holly Beale, Oscar Ramirez, Farhad Hormozdiari, Can Alkan, Carles Vilà, Kevin Squire, Eli Geffen, Josip Kusak, Adam R. Boyko, Heidi G. Parker, Clarence Lee, Vasisht Tadigotla, Adam Siepel, Carlos D. Bustamante, Timothy T. Harkins … & John Novembre
To identify genetic changes underlying dog domestication and reconstruct their early evolutionary history, we generated high-quality genome sequences from three gray wolves, one from each of the three putative centers of dog domestication, two basal dog lineages (Basenji and Dingo) and a golden jackal as an outgroup. Analysis of these sequences supports a demographic model in which dogs and wolves diverged through a dynamic process involving population bottlenecks in both lineages and post-divergence gene flow....

Data from: Reference-free transcriptome assembly in non-model animals from next generation sequencing data

Vincent Cahais, Philippe Gayral, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, José Melo-Ferreira, Marion Ballenghien, Lucy Weinert, Ylenia Chiari, Khalid Belkhir, Vincent Ranwez & Nicolas Galtier
Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies offer the opportunity for population genomic study of non-model organisms sampled in the wild. The transcriptome is a convenient and popular target for such purposes. However, designing genetic markers from NGS transcriptome data requires assembling gene-coding sequences out of short reads. This is a complex task owing to gene duplications, genetic polymorphism, alternative splicing and transcription noise. Typical assembling programmes return thousands of predicted contigs, whose connection to the species true...

Data from: Signalling with a cryptic trait: the regularity of barred plumage in common waxbills

Cristiana I. J. Marques, Helena R. Batalha & Gonçalo C. Cardoso
Sexual signals often compromise camouflage, because of their conspicuousness. Pigmentation patterns, on the contrary, aid in camouflage. It was hypothesized that a particular type of pattern — barred plumage in birds, whereby pigmented bars extend across feathers — could simultaneously signal individual quality, because disruptions of these patterns should be perceptually salient at close range and help assess plumage condition. Here we show that common waxbills (Estrilda astrild), which have extensive barred plumage, have more...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    8
  • 2021
    16
  • 2020
    26
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    17
  • 2017
    19
  • 2016
    15
  • 2015
    19
  • 2014
    19
  • 2013
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    166

Affiliations

  • University of Porto
    166
  • University of Montana
    13
  • University of Lisbon
    11
  • University of Sheffield
    9
  • University of Valencia
    8
  • University of Montpellier
    8
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    6
  • Duke University
    4
  • Lund University
    4
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    4