19 Works

Data from: Evolution of alternative male morphotypes in oxyurid nematodes: a case of convergence?

Fátima Jorge, Ana Perera, Vicente Roca, Miguel Carretero, D. James Harris, Robert Poulin & M. A. Carretero
Male dimorphism has been reported across different taxa, and is usually expressed as the coexistence of a larger morph with exaggerated male traits and a smaller one with reduced traits. The evolution and maintenance of male dimorphism are still poorly understood for several of the species in which it has been observed. Here, we analyse male dimorphism in several species of reptile parasitic nematodes of the genus Spauligodon, in which a major male morph (exaggerated...

Data from: \"De novo transcriptome assembly and polymorphism detection in ecological important widely distributed Neotropical toads from the Rhinella marina species complex (Anura: Bufonidade)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

Coralie Nourisson, Miguel Carneiro, Marcelo Vallinoto & Fernando Sequeira
The toads Rhinella marina and R. schneideri are large terrestrial true toads widely distributed in the Neotropical region, which can hybridize in areas of transition between Amazon rain forest and Cerrado biomes. The former is in particular an important ecological species, and a very successful invader. Here, we report de novo transcriptome of R. marina and R. schneideri and polymorphism SNPs identified between the two species. The transcriptome sequencing was performed on an Illumina platform...

Data from: Ecomorphological variation in male and female wall lizards and the macroecolution of sexual dimorphism in relation to habitat use

Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou, Miguel A. Carretero & Dean C. Adams
Understanding how phenotypic diversity evolves is a major interest of evolutionary biology. Habitat use is an important factor in the evolution of phenotypic diversity of many animal species. Interestingly, male and female phenotypes have been frequently shown to respond differently to environmental variation. At the macroevolutionary level, this difference between the sexes is frequently analyzed by using phylogenetic comparative tools to assess variation in sexual dimorphism (SD) across taxa in relation to habitat. A shortcoming...

Data from: Genetic identification of endangered North African ungulates using noninvasive sampling

Teresa Luísa Silva, Raquel Godinho, Diana Castro, Teresa Abáigar, José Carlos Brito & Paulo Célio Alves
North African ungulates include several threatened and emblematic species, yet are poorly studied mainly due to their remoteness and elusiveness. Noninvasive sampling provides a useful approach to obtain ecological and genetic information essential to guide conservation actions. The very first and most important step in conservation planning is to accurately identify species, and molecular genetics has been proved to be a useful tool. Several molecular genetics protocols are available for species identification, even for samples...

Data from: \"Identification and assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between Culex complex mosquitoes.\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

David S. Kang & Cheolho Sim
Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes are important vectors for many human pathogens including West Nile encephalitis, Rift Valley fever and Lymphatic filariasis. In this study we characterized a set of SNP markers between two biotypes of the Culex pipiens complex, Culex pipiens form molestus and Culex pipiens form pipiens, for use in a high-resolution genetic mapping and population genetics. DNA pooled from 10 specimens of each biotype were sequenced and analyzed for variation in 28 genes....

Data from: Niche evolution and thermal adaptation in the temperate species Drosophila americana

Neftali Sillero, Micael Reis, Cristina P. Vieira, Jorge Vieira, Ramiro Morales Hojas & R. Morales-Hojas
The study of ecological niche evolution is fundamental for understanding how the environment influences species’ geographical distributions and their adaptation to divergent environments. Here we present a study of the ecological niche, demographic history and thermal performance (locomotor activity, developmental time and fertility/viability) of the temperate species Drosophila americana and its two chromosomal forms. Temperature is the environmental factor that contributes most to the species’ and chromosomal forms’ ecological niches, although precipitation is also important...

Data from: Hybridization at an ecotone: ecological and genetic barriers between three Iberian vipers

Pedro Tarroso, Ricardo J. Pereira, Fernando Martínez-Freiría, Raquel Godinho & José Carlos Brito
The formation of stable genetic boundaries between emerging species is often diagnosed by reduced hybrid fitness relative to parental taxa. This reduced fitness can arise from endogenous and/or exogenous barriers to gene flow. Although detecting exogenous barriers in nature is difficult, we can estimate the role of ecological divergence in driving species boundaries by integrating molecular and ecological niche modelling tools. Here, we focus on a three-way secondary contact zone between three viper species (Vipera...

Data from: Bushmeat genetics: setting up a reference framework for the DNA-typing of African forest bushmeat

Philippe Gaubert, Flobert Njiokou, Ayodeji Olayemi, Paolo Pagani, Sylvain Dufour, Emmanuel Danquah, Mac Elikem K. Nutsuakor, Gabriel Ngua, Alain-Didier Missoup, Pablo A. Tedesco, Rémy Dernat & Agostinho Antunes
The bushmeat trade in tropical Africa represents illegal, unsustainable off-takes of millions of tons of wild game – mostly mammals – per year. We sequenced four mitochondrial gene fragments (cyt b, COI, 12S, 16S) in >300 bushmeat items representing nine mammalian orders and 59 morphological species from five western and central African countries (Guinea, Ghana, Nigeria, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea). Our objectives were to assess the efficiency of cross-species PCR amplification and to evaluate the...

Data from: Similar preferences for ornamentation in opposite- and same-sex choice experiments

Gonçalo C. Cardoso, Ana V. Leitão, Caterina Funghi, Helena R. Batalha, Ricardo J. Lopes & Paulo G. Mota
Selection due to social interactions comprises competition over matings (sexual selection stricto sensu) plus other forms of social competition and cooperation. Sexual selection explains sex differences in ornamentation and in various other phenotypes, but does not easily explain cases where those phenotypes are similar in males and females. Understanding such similarities requires knowing how phenotypes influence non-sexual social interactions as well, which can be very important in gregarious animals, but whose role for phenotypic evolution...

Data from: Natural selection for the Duffy-null allele in the recently admixed people of Madagascar

Jason A. Hodgson, Joseph K. Pickrell, Laurel N. Pearson, Ellen E. Quillen, Antonio Prista, Jorge Rocha, Himla Soodyall, Mark D. Shriver & George H. Perry
While gene flow between distantly related populations is increasingly recognized as a potentially important source of adaptive genetic variation for humans, fully characterized examples are rare. In addition, the role that natural selection for resistance to vivax malaria may have played in the extreme distribution of the protective Duffy-null allele, which is nearly completely fixed in mainland sub-Saharan Africa and absent elsewhere, is controversial. We address both these issues by investigating the evolution of the...

Data from: Does the niche-breadth or trade-off hypothesis explain the abundance-occupancy relationship in avian haemosporidia?

Sergei V. Drovetski, Sargis A. Aghayan, Vanessa A. Mata, Ricardo J. Lopes, Nicolle A. Mode, Johanna A. Harvey & Gary Voelker
Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the abundance-occupancy relationship (AOR) in parasites. The niche-breadth hypothesis suggests that host generalists are more abundant and efficient at colonizing different host communities than specialists. The trade-off hypothesis argues that host specialists achieve high density across their hosts’ ranges, whereas generalists incur the high cost of adaptation to diverse immuno-defense systems. We tested these hypotheses using 386 haemosporidian cytochrome-b lineages (1894 sequences) recovered from 2318 birds of 103...

Data from: Effect of microsatellite selection on individual and population genetic inferences: an empirical study using cross-specific and species-specific amplifications

Joao Queiros, Raquel Godinho, Susana Lopes, Christian Gortazar, Jose De La Fuente & Paulo C. Alves
Although whole-genome sequencing is becoming more accessible and feasible for nonmodel organisms, microsatellites have remained the markers of choice for various population and conservation genetic studies. However, the criteria for choosing microsatellites are still controversial due to ascertainment bias that may be introduced into the genetic inference. An empirical study of red deer (Cervus elaphus) populations, in which cross-specific and species-specific microsatellites developed through pyrosequencing of enriched libraries, was performed for this study. Two different...

Data from: The phylogeny of pikas (Ochotona) inferred from a multilocus coalescent approach

José Melo-Ferreira, Ana Lemos De Matos, Helena Areal, Andrey A. Lissovsky, Miguel Carneiro & Pedro J. Esteves
The clarification of the systematics of pikas (genus Ochotona) has been hindered by largely overlapping morphological characters among species and the lack of a comprehensive molecular phylogeny. Here we estimate the first multilocus phylogeny of the genus to date, by analysing 12 nuclear DNA markers (total of 7.5 Kb) in 11 species of pikas from the four classified subgenera (Pika, Ochotona, Lagotona and Conothoa) using a multispecies coalescent-based framework. The species-tree confirmed the subgeneric classification...

Data from: \"De novo transcriptome assembly of the mountain fly Drosophila nigrosparsa using short RNA-seq reads\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2014-30 September 2014

Wolfgang Arthofer, Francesco Cicconardi, Nicola Palmieri, Viola Nolte, Christian Schlötterer, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Marcelo Vallinoto, David A. Weese, B. L. Banbury, R. B. Harris, David S. Kang, Cheolho Sim, Thomas F. Duda, A. D. Leaché, Miguel Carneiro, Coralie Nourisson & Fernando Sequeira
Drosophila (Drosophila) nigrosparsa is a habitat specialist restricted to the European montane/alpine zone (Bächli 2008). Mountain biodiversity is considered highly vulnerable to ongoing climate warming (IPCC 2013), and organisms at high altitudes have only limited possibility to shift to cooler habitats at elevations above (Pertoldi & Bach 2007). For such species, rapid evolution may offer a solution for long-term survival. We are establishing D. nigrosparsa as a model system to test the extent and tempo...

Data from: Evolution at a different pace: distinctive phylogenetic patterns of cone snails from two ancient oceanic archipelagos

Regina L. Cunha, Fernando P. Lima, Manuel J. Tenorio, Ana A. Ramos, Rita Castilho & Suzanne T. Williams
Ancient oceanic archipelagos of similar geological age are expected to accrue comparable numbers of endemic lineages with identical life history strategies, especially if the islands exhibit analogous habitats. We tested this hypothesis using marine snails of the genus Conus from the Atlantic archipelagos of Cape Verde and Canary Islands. Together with Azores and Madeira, these archipelagos comprise the Macaronesia biogeographic region and differ remarkably in the diversity of this group. More than 50 endemic Conus...

Data from: Real-time assessment of hybridization between wolves and dogs: combining non-invasive samples with ancestry informative markers

Raquel Godinho, José Vicente López-Bao, Diana Castro, Luís Llaneza, Susana Lopes, Pedro Silva & Nuno Ferrand
Wolves and dogs provide a paradigmatic example of the ecological and conservation implications of hybridization events between wild and domesticated forms. However, our understanding of such implications has been traditionally hampered by both high genetic similarity and the difficulties in obtaining tissue samples (TS), which limit our ability to assess ongoing hybridization events. To assess the occurrence and extension of hybridization in a pack of wolf-dog hybrids in Northwestern Iberia, we compared the power of...

Data from: Conservation implications of the evolutionary history and genetic diversity hotspots of the snowshoe hare

Ellen Cheng, Karen E. Hodges, José Melo-Ferreira, Paulo C. Alves & L. Scott Mills
With climate warming, the ranges of many boreal species are expected to shift northward and to fragment in southern peripheral ranges. To understand the conservation implications of losing southern populations, we examined range-wide genetic diversity of the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus), an important prey species that drives boreal ecosystem dynamics. We analysed microsatellite (8 loci) and mitochondrial DNA sequence (cytochrome b and control region) variation in almost 1000 snowshoe hares. A hierarchical structure analysis of...

Data from: The hidden history of the snowshoe hare, Lepus americanus: extensive mitochondrial DNA introgression inferred from multilocus genetic variation

José Melo-Ferreira, Fernando A. Seixas, Ellen Cheng, L. Scott Mills & Paulo C. Alves
Hybridization drives the evolutionary trajectory of many species or local populations, and assessing the geographic extent and genetic impact of interspecific gene flow may provide invaluable clues to understand population divergence or the adaptive relevance of admixture. In North America, hares (Lepus spp.) are key species for ecosystem dynamics and their evolutionary history may have been affected by hybridization. Here we reconstructed the speciation history of the three most widespread hares in North America -...

Data from: Recovery of large carnivores in Europe’s modern human-dominated landscapes

Guillaume Chapron, Petra Kaczensky, John D. C. Linnell, Manuela Von Arx, Djuro Huber, Henrik Andrén, José Vicente López-Bao, Michal Adamec, Francisco Álvares, Ole Anders, Linas Balčiauskas, Vaidas Balys, Péter Bedő, Ferdinand Bego, Juan Carlos Blanco, Urs Breitenmoser, Henrik Brøseth, Luděk Bufka, Raimonda Bunikyte, Paolo Ciucci, Alexander Dutsov, Thomas Engleder, Christian Fuxjäger, Claudio Groff, Katja Holmala … & Luigi Boitani
The conservation of large carnivores is a formidable challenge for biodiversity conservation. Using a data set on the past and current status of brown bears (Ursus arctos), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), gray wolves (Canis lupus), and wolverines (Gulo gulo) in European countries, we show that roughly one-third of mainland Europe hosts at least one large carnivore species, with stable or increasing abundance in most cases in 21st-century records. The reasons for this overall conservation success...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Porto
    19
  • University of Montana
    4
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • University of Innsbruck
    2
  • Baylor University
    1
  • Ministry of Environment of the Republic of Lithuania
    1
  • Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
    1