19 Works

Data from: The transcriptional landscape of seasonal coat colour moult in the snowshoe hare

Mafalda S. Ferreira, Paulo C. Alves, Colin M. Callahan, João P. Marques, L. Scott Mills, Jeffrey M. Good & José Melo-Ferreira
Seasonal coat colour change is an important adaptation to seasonally changing environments but the evolution of this and other circannual traits remains poorly understood. In this study we use gene expression to understand seasonal coat colour moulting in wild snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). We used hair colour to follow the progression of the moult, simultaneously sampling skin from three moulting stages in hares collected during the peak of the spring moult from white winter to...

Data from: Distribution and functionality of copy number variation across European cattle populations

Maulik Upadhyay, Vinicius H. Da Silva, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Marleen H. P. W. Visker, Paolo Ajmone-Marsan, Valentin A. Bâlteanu, Susana Dunner, Jose Fernando Garcia, Catarina Ginja, Juha Kantanen, Martien A.M. Groenen, Richard P.M.A. Crooijmans, Vinicus H. Da Silva, Martien A. M. Groenen & Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans
Copy number variation (CNV), which is characterized by large-scale losses or gains of DNA fragments, contributes significantly to genetic and phenotypic variation. Assessing CNV across different European cattle populations might reveal genetic changes responsible for phenotypic differences, which have accumulated throughout the domestication history of cattle as consequences of evolutionary forces that act upon them. To explore pattern of CNVs across European cattle, we genotyped 149 individuals, that represent different European regions, using the Illumina...

Data from: Intensity of male-male competition predicts morph diversity in a colour polymorphic lizard

Guillem Perez I De Lanuza, Miguel A. Carretero & Enrique Font
Sexual selection is one of the main processes involved in the emergence and maintenance of heritable colour polymorphisms in a variety of taxa. Here we test whether the intensity of sexual selection, estimated from population sex ratio, predicts morph diversity in Podarcis muralis, a colour polymorphic lizard with discrete white, yellow, orange, white-orange, and yellow-orange male and female phenotypes (i.e. morphs). In a sample of 116 Pyrenean populations and 5421 lizards, sex ratios (m/f) vary...

Data from: Morphological and functional implications of sexual size dimorphism in the Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica

Federico Massetti, Verónica Gomes, Anna Perera, Catarina Rato & Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou
Sexual dimorphism (SD) is a common trait in animals, appearing due to sexual selection, fecundity selection or natural selection promoting sexual niche segregation. To evaluate the relative contribution of these mechanisms in shaping phenotypic patterns, we explored morphological and functional SD in the Moorish gecko, Tarentola mauritanica (Linnaeus, 1758). This species is particularly interesting because the sex of individuals is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs, which may pose constraints on the expression...

Data from: Allelopathy prevents competitive exclusion and promotes phytoplankton biodiversity

Aldo Barreiro Felpeto, Shovonlal Roy & Vitor Manuel Vasconcelos
It has been hypothesized that allelopathy can prevent competitive exclusion and promote phytoplankton diversity in aquatic ecosystems, where numerous species coexist on a limited number of resources. However, experimental proof-of-principle is not available to support this hypothesis. Here we present the first experimental evidence to support this hypothesis by demonstrating that allelopathy promotes the coexistence of two phytoplankton species, Ankistrodesmus falcatus and Oscillatoria sp., that compete for a single limiting nutrient. By performing long-term competition...

Data from: Getting there and around: host range oscillations during colonisation of the Canary Islands by the parasitic nematode Spauligodon

Fátima Jorge, Ana Perera, Robert Poulin, Vicente Roca & Miguel A. Carretero
Episodes of expansion and isolation in geographic range over space and time, during which parasites have the opportunity to expand their host range, are linked to the development of host-parasite mosaic assemblages and parasite diversification. In this study we investigated whether island colonisation events lead to host range oscillations in a taxon of host-specific parasitic nematodes of the genus Spauligodon in the Canary Islands. We further investigated if range oscillations also resulted in shifts in...

Data from: A multispecies approach reveals hot-spots and cold-spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes

Abigail E. Cahill, Aurelien De Jode, Sophie Dubois, Zoheir Bouzaza, Didier Aurelle, Emilie Boissin, Olivier Chabrol, Romain David, Emilie Egea, Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Bastien Merigot, Alexandra Anh-Thu Weber & Anne Chenuil
Genetic diversity is crucial for species’ maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed...

Data from: Colour patch size and measurement error using reflectance spectrometry

Arnaud Badiane, Guillem Pérez I De Lanuza, María Del Carmen García-Custodio, Pau Carazo & Enrique Font
1. Over the past twenty years, portable and relatively affordable spectrophotometers have greatly advanced the study of animal coloration. However, the small size of many colour patches poses methodological challenges that have not, to date, been assessed in the literature. Here, we tackle this issue for a reflectance spectrophotometry set-up widely used in ecology and evolution (the beam method). 2. We reviewed the literature on animal coloration reporting the use of reflectance spectrophotometry to explore...

Data from: ProtASR: an evolutionary framework for ancestral protein reconstruction with selection on folding stability

Miguel Arenas, Claudia C. Weber, David A. Liberles & Ugo Bastolla
The computational reconstruction of ancestral proteins provides information on past biological events and has practical implications for biomedicine and biotechnology. Currently available tools for ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) are often based on empirical amino acid substitution models that assume that all sites evolve at the same rate and under the same process. However, this assumption is frequently violated because protein evolution is highly heterogeneous due to different selective constraints among sites. Here, we present ProtASR,...

Data from: Using beta diversity to inform agricultural policies and conservation actions on Mediterranean farmland

Joana Santana, Miguel Porto, Luis Reino, Francisco Moreira, Paulo Flores Ribeiro, José Lima Santo, John T. Rotenberry & Pedro Beja
1. Spatial variation in species composition (β-diversity) is an important component of farmland biodiversity, which together with local richness (α-diversity) drives the number of species in a region (γ-diversity). However, β-diversity is seldom used to inform conservation, due to limited understanding of its responses to agricultural management, and lack of clear links between β-diversity changes and conservation outcomes. 2. We explored the value of β-diversity to guide conservation on farmland, by quantifying the contribution of...

Data from: Towards a functional understanding of species coexistence: ecomorphological variation in relation to whole-organism performance in two sympatric lizards

Anamarija Žagar, Miguel A. Carretero, Al Vrezec, Katarina Drašler & Antigoni Kaliontzopoulou
1. We examined intra- and interspecific variation in functional morphology and whole-organism performance in a sympatric lizard species pair, Iberolacerta horvathi and Podarcis muralis, in the area with a high potential for competition. 2. The biggest variation between species was found in two functional traits, bite force and climbing speed, linked with corresponding morphological traits. 3. The species with larger and taller heads, P. muralis, exhibited correspondingly stronger bite forces. The other species exhibited smaller...

Data from: Interpreting the genomic landscape of speciation: a road map for finding barriers to gene flow

Mark Ravinet, Rui Faria, Roger K. Butlin, Juan Galindo, Nicolas Bierne, Marina Rafajlović, Mohamed A. F. Noor, Bernhard Mehlig & Anja M. Westram
Speciation, the evolution of reproductive isolation amongst populations, is continuous, complex, and involves multiple, interacting barriers. Until it is complete, the effects of this process vary along the genome and can lead to a heterogeneous genomic landscape with peaks and troughs of differentiation and divergence. When gene flow occurs during speciation, barriers restricting migration locally in the genome lead to patterns of heterogeneity. However, genomic heterogeneity can also be produced or modified by variation in...

Data from: Dopamine disruption increases cleanerfish cooperative investment in novel client partners

Marta C. Soares, Teresa P. Santos & João P.M. Messias
Social familiarization is a process of gaining knowledge that results from direct or indirect participation in social events. Cooperative exchanges are thought to be conditional upon familiarity with others. Indeed, individuals seem to prefer to engage with those that have previously interacted with them, which are more accurate predictors of reward than novel partners. On the other hand, highly social animals do seek novelty. Truth is that the physiological bases underlying how familiarity and novelty...

Data from: The curious case of Bradypus variegatus sloths: populations in threatened habitats are biodiversity components needing protection

Sofia Marques Silva, José A. Dávila, Bryson Voirin, Susana Lopes, Nuno Ferrand & Nadia Moraes-Barros
Studying Neotropical wild populations is of particular interest. While this region is facing an escalating habitat degradation, it also has remarkable biodiversity levels, whose origin we are only beginning to understand. A myriad of processes might have had idiosyncratic effects on its numerous species. Within the hottest Neotropical biodiversity hotspot, the Atlantic Forest (AF), species and genetic diversities are organized latitudinally, with decreasing diversity levels southwards. Bradypus variegatus, the brown-throated three-toed sloth, was one of...

Data from: Invasive earthworms erode soil biodiversity: a meta-analysis

Olga Ferlian, Nico Eisenhauer, Martin Aguirrebengoa, Mariama Camara, Irene Ramirez-Rojas, Fabio Santos, Krizler Tanalgo & Madhav P. Thakur
1. Biological invasions pose a serious threat to biodiversity and ecosystem functioning across ecosystems. Invasions by ecosystem engineers, in particular, have been shown to have dramatic effects in recipient ecosystems. For instance, invasion by earthworms, a belowground invertebrate ecosystem engineer, in previously earthworm-free ecosystems dramatically alters the physico-chemical characteristics of the soil. Studies have shown that such alterations in the soil can have far-reaching impacts on soil organisms, which form a major portion of terrestrial...

Data from: Comparison of photo-matching algorithms commonly used for photographic capture-recapture studies

Maximilian Matthé, Marco Sannolo, Kristopher Winiarski, Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Daniel Goedbloed, Sebastian Steinfartz & Ulrich Stachow
Photographic capture–recapture is a valuable tool for obtaining demographic information on wildlife populations due to its noninvasive nature and cost-effectiveness. Recently, several computer-aided photo-matching algorithms have been developed to more efficiently match images of unique individuals in databases with thousands of images. However, the identification accuracy of these algorithms can severely bias estimates of vital rates and population size. Therefore, it is important to understand the performance and limitations of state-of-the-art photo-matching algorithms prior to...

Data from: High-density lipoprotein receptor SCARB1 is required for carotenoid coloration in birds

Matthew B. Toomey, Ricardo J. Lopes, Pedro M. Araújo, James D. Johnson, Malgorzata A. Gazda, Sandra Afonso, Paulo G. Mota, Rebecca E. Koch, Geoffrey E. Hill, Joseph C. Corbo & Miguel Carneiro
Yellow, orange, and red coloration is a fundamental aspect of avian diversity and serves as an important signal in mate choice and aggressive interactions. This coloration is often produced through the deposition of diet-derived carotenoid pigments, yet the mechanisms of carotenoid uptake and transport are not well-understood. The white recessive breed of the common canary (Serinus canaria), which carries an autosomal recessive mutation that renders its plumage pure white, provides a unique opportunity to investigate...

Data from: Agriculture shapes the trophic niche of a bat preying on multiple pest arthropods across Europe: evidence from DNA metabarcoding

Ostaizka Aizpurua, Ivana Budinski, Panagiotis Georgiakakis, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Carlos Ibáñez, Vanessa Mata, Hugo Rebelo, Danilo Russo, Farkas Szodoray-Parádi, Violeta Zhelyazkova, Vida Zrncic, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Antton Alberdi
The interaction between agricultural production and wildlife can shape, and even condition, the functioning of both systems. In this study we i) explored the degree to which a widespread European bat, namely the common bent-wing bat Miniopterus schreibersii, consumes crop-damaging insects at a continental scale, and ii) tested whether its dietary niche is shaped by the extension and type of agricultural fields. We employed a dual-primer DNA metabarcoding approach to characterise arthropod 16S and COI...

Data from: The ‘golden kelp’ Laminaria ochroleuca under global change: integrating multiple eco-physiological responses with species distribution models

João N. Franco, Fernando Tuya, Iacopo Bertocci, Laura Rodriguez, Brezo Martinez, Isabel Sousa-Pinto & Francisco Arenas
1. The loss of marine foundation species, in particular kelps at temperate latitudes, has been linked to climatic drivers and co-occurring human perturbations. Ocean temperature and nutrients typically co-vary over local and regional scales and play a crucial role on kelp dynamics. Examining their independent and interactive effects on kelp physiological performance is essential to understand and predict patterns of kelp distribution, particularly under scenarios of global change. 2. Crossed combinations of ocean temperatures and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    19

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    19

Affiliations

  • University of Porto
    19
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • University of Valencia
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Eastern Finland
    1
  • University of Crete
    1