17 Works

Data from: Moving in the Anthropocene: global reductions in terrestrial mammalian movements

Marlee A. Tucker, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, William F. Fagan, John M. Fryxell, Bram Van Moorter, Susan C. Alberts, Abdullahi H. Ali, Andrew M. Allen, Nina Attias, Tal Avgar, Hattie Bartlam-Brooks, Buuveibaatar Bayarbaatar, Jerrold L. Belant, Alessandra Bertassoni, Dean Beyer, Laura Bidner, Floris M. Van Beest, Stephen Blake, Niels Blaum, Chloe Bracis, Danielle Brown, P. J. Nico De Bruyn, Francesca Cagnacci, Justin M. Calabrese, Constança Camilo-Alves … & Thomas Mueller
Animal movement is fundamental for ecosystem functioning and species survival, yet the effects of the anthropogenic footprint on animal movements have not been estimated across species. Using a unique GPS-tracking database of 803 individuals across 57 species, we found that movements of mammals in areas with a comparatively high human footprint were on average one-half to one-third the extent of their movements in areas with a low human footprint. We attribute this reduction to behavioral...

Data from: Females know better: sex-biased habitat selection by the European wildcat

Teresa Oliveira, Fermin Urra, José María Lopez-Martín, Elena Balleteros-Duperón, José Miguel Barea-Azcón, Marcos Moleón, José Maria Gil-Sánchez, Paulo Celio Alves, Francisco Díaz-Ruíz, Pablo Ferreras & Pedro Monterroso
The interactions between animals and their environment vary across species, regions, but also with gender. Sex‐specific relations between individuals and the ecosystem may entail different behavioral choices and be expressed through different patterns of habitat use. Regardless, only rarely sex‐specific traits are addressed in ecological modeling approaches. The European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) is a species of conservation concern in Europe, with a highly fragmented and declining distribution across most of its range. We assessed...

Data from: Genome-wide associations identify novel candidate loci associated with genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis in wild boar

João Queirós, Paulo Célio Alves, Joaquín Vicente, Christian Gortázar & José De La Fuente
Tuberculosis (TB) affects a wide range of host species worldwide. Understanding host-pathogen co-evolution remains a global challenge owing to complex interactions among host genetic factors, pathogen traits and environmental conditions. We used an endemic wild boar population that had undergone a huge increase in Mycobacterium bovis infection prevalence, from 45% in 2002/06 to 83% in 2009/12, to understand the effects of host genetics on host TB outcomes and disease dynamics. Host genomic variation was characterized...

Data from: A metabolic syndrome in terrestrial ectotherms with different elevational and distribution patterns

Anamarija Žagar, Miguel A. Carretero, Diana Marguč, Tatjana Simčič & Al Vrezec
The metabolic performance of ectotherms is expected to be driven by the environment in which they live. Ecologically similar species with contrasting elevation distributions occurring in sympatry at mid-elevations, provide good models for studying how physiological responses to temperature vary as a function of adaptation to different elevations.. Under sympatry, at middle elevations, where divergent species ranges overlap, sympatric populations are expected to have similar thermal responses, suggesting similar local acclimation or adaptation, while observed...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: Postglacial range expansion shaped the spatial genetic structure in a marine habitat-forming species: implications for conservation plans in the Eastern Adriatic Sea

Jean-Baptiste Ledoux, Maša Frleta-Valić, Silvija Kipson, Agostinho Antunes, Emma Cebrian, Cristina Linares, Pablo Sánchez, Raphael Leblois & Joaquim Garrabou
Aim: Understanding how historical and contemporary processes shaped and maintain spatial patterns of genetic diversity is a major goal for conservation biologists. Here, we characterized the pattern of neutral genetic diversity and we inferred underlying processes in the habitat-forming octocoral Paramuricea clavata in the Adriatic Sea, a peculiar phylogeographic region of the Mediterranean Sea. Location: Eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea. Methods: We genotyped seven microsatellites in 454 individuals of P. clavata from 13 populations...

Data from: Using molecular diet analysis to inform invasive species management: a case study of introduced rats consuming endemic New Zealand frogs

Bastian Egeter, Cailin Roe, Sara Peixoto, Pamela Puppo, Luke J. Easton, Joana Pinto, Phil J. Bishop & Bruce C. Robertson
The decline of amphibians has been of international concern for more than two decades and the global spread of introduced fauna is a major factor in this decline. Conservation management decisions to implement control of introduced fauna are often based on diet studies. One of the most common metrics to report in diet studies is Frequency of Occurrence (FO), but this can be difficult to interpret, as it does not include a temporal perspective. Here...

Data from: Maintenance costs of male dominance and sexually antagonistic selection in the wild

Zbyszek Boratynski, Esa Koskela, Tapio Mappes, Suzanne C. Mills & Mikael Mokkonen
1. Variation in dominance status determines male mating and reproductive success, but natural selection for male dominance can be detrimental or antagonistic for female performance, and ultimately their fitness. Attaining and maintaining a high dominance status in a population of competing individuals is physiologically costly for males. But how male dominance status is mediated by maintenance energetics is currently not well understood, nor are the correlational effects of male energetics on his sisters recognized. 2....

Data from: The \"Woman in Red\" Effect: pipefish males curb pregnancies at the sight of an attractive female

Mário Cunha, Anders Berglund, Sara Mendes & Nuno Monteiro
In an old Gene Wilder movie, an attractive woman dressed in red devastated a man’s current relationship. We have found a similar “Woman in Red” effect in pipefish, a group of fish where pregnancy occurs in males. We tested for the existence of pregnancy blocks in pregnant male black-striped pipefish (Syngnathus abaster). We allowed pregnant males to see females that were larger and even more attractive than their original high-quality mates and monitored the survival...

Data from: A non-coding region near Follistatin controls head colour polymorphism in the Gouldian finch

Matthew B. Toomey, Cristiana I. Marques, Pedro Andrade, Pedro Miguel Araújo, Stephen Sabatino, Malgorzata A. Gazda, Sandra Afonso, Ricardo J. Lopes, Joseph C. Corbo & Miguel Carneiro
Discrete color morphs coexisting within a single population are common in nature. In a broad range of organisms, sympatric color morphs often display major differences in other traits, including morphology, physiology, or behavior. Despite the repeated occurrence of this phenomenon, our understanding of the genetics that underlie multi-trait differences and the factors that promote the long-term maintenance of phenotypic variability within a freely interbreeding population are incomplete. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of red...

Data from: Following the water? landscape-scale temporal changes in bat spatial distribution in relation to Mediterranean summer drought

Francisco Amorim, Inês Jorge, Pedro Beja & Hugo Rebelo
Understanding how the spatial distribution of ecological resources shape species’ diversity and abundance in human-modified landscapes is a central theme in conservation biology. However, studies often disregard that such patterns may vary over time, thereby potentially missing critical environmental constraints to species persistence. This may be particularly important in highly mobile species such as bats, which are able to track temporal variations in spatial resource distribution. Here we test the hypothesis that bats in Mediterranean...

Data from: Drivers of power line use by white storks: a case study of birds nesting on anthropogenic structures

Francisco Moreira, Ricardo C. Martins, Ines Catry & Marcello D'Amico
1. Anthropogenic structures are mainly known to have negative impacts on wildlife populations but sometimes arethey can be beneficial. Power lines are a main driver of bird mortality through collision or electrocution, but electricity pylons are also commonly used for nest building by some species. Birds and nests cause power outages that need to be tackled by electricity companies. However, the use of pylons by threatened species provides an opportunity for conservation purposes. 2. In...

Data from: Winter coat color polymorphisms identify global hotspots for evolutionary rescue from climate change

L. Scott Mills, Eugenia V. Bragina, Alexander V. Kumar, Marketa Zimova, Diana J.R. Lafferty, Jennifer Feltner, Brandon M. Davis, Klaus Hacklander, Paulo C. Alves, Jeffrey M. Good, Jose Melo-Ferreira, Andreas Dietz, Alexei V. Abramov, Natalia Lopatina & Kairsten Fay
Maintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically-driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorporation of evolutionary processes into global conservation efforts. In 22 vertebrate species, some individuals undergo a seasonal color molt from summer brown to winter white...

Data from: Dressed to impress: breeding plumage as a reliable signal of innate immunity

Sara Pardal, Jose A. Alves, Paulo G. Mota & Jaime A. Ramos
Animal signals involved in sexual selection are often indicators of individual quality. The assumption that sexual characters such as breeding plumage may indicate immune state has rarely been tested in free-living migratory birds, particularly in relation to innate immunity. If sexual characters indeed reflect immune condition, then these could be used to evaluate individual quality. Melanin is a common pigment used in animal communication that mitigates the effects of oxidative stress and has positive effects...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Naturalized plants decrease diet similarity between an invasive bird and its most similar native species

Gonçalo C. Rodrigues, Paulo Alves, Joana R. Vicente, João P. Honrado & Gonçalo C. Cardoso
Although invasive animals can compete with native species for resources, detrimental competition for food is seldom reported in the avian invasions literature. In temperate climates, food limitation and energetic stress are higher during winter and, thus, winter diets might reveal competition that is not apparent during the rest of the year. We compared autumn and winter diets of the invasive common waxbill (Estrilda astrild) in northwest Iberia, and of the native bird most similar to...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding unveils multi‐scale trophic variation in a widespread coastal opportunist

Andjin Siegenthaler, Owen S. Wangensteen, Chiara Benvenuto, Joana Campos & Stefano Mariani
A thorough understanding of ecological networks relies on comprehensive information on trophic relationships among species. Since unpicking the diet of many organisms is unattainable using traditional morphology‐based approaches, the application of high‐throughput sequencing methods represents a rapid and powerful way forward. Here, we assessed the application of DNA‐metabarcoding with nearly universal primers for the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) in defining the trophic ecology of adult brown shrimp, Crangon crangon, in six European...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • University of Porto
    17
  • University of Montana
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    2
  • The Ohio State University
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    2
  • University of Lisbon
    2
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • Friends University
    1