20 Works

Data from: Biting disrupts integration to spur skull evolution in eels

David C. Collar, Peter C. Wainwright, Michael E. Alfaro, Liam J. Revell & Rita S. Mehta
The demand that anatomical structures work together to perform biological functions is thought to impose strong limits on morphological evolution. Breakthroughs in diversification can occur, however, when functional integration among structures is relaxed. Although such transitions are expected to generate variation in morphological diversification across the tree of life, empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. Here we show that transitions between suction-based and biting modes of prey capture, which require different degrees of coordination...

Data from: Ephemeral stream reaches preserve the evolutionary and distributional history of threespine stickleback in the Santa Clara and Ventura River Watersheds of southern California

Jonathan Q. Richmond, David K. Jacobs, Adam R. Backlin, Camm C. Swift, Chris Dellith & Robert N. Fisher
Much remains to be understood about the evolutionary history and contemporary landscape genetics of unarmored threespine stickleback in southern California, where populations collectively referred to as Gasterosteus aculeatus williamsoni have severely declined over the past 70+ years and are now endangered. We used mitochondrial sequence and microsatellite data to assess the population genetics and phylogeography of unarmored populations sampled immediately downstream from the type locality of G. a. williamsoni in the upper Santa Clara River,...

Data from: A role for migration-linked genes and genomic islands in divergence of a songbird

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Jason Boone, Jazz Pouls & Thomas B. Smith
Next-generation sequencing has made it possible to begin asking questions about the process of divergence at the level of the genome. For example, recently there has been a debate around the role of “genomic islands of divergence” (i.e. blocks of outlier loci) in facilitating the process of speciation-with-gene-flow. The Swainson’s thrush, Catharus ustulatus, is a migratory songbird with two genetically-distinct subspecies that differ in a number of traits known to be involved in reproductive isolation...

Data from: Effects of temperature on consumer-resource interactions

Priyanga Amarasekare
1. Understanding how temperature variation influences the negative (e.g., self-limitation) and positive feedback (e.g., saturating functional responses) processes that characterize consumer-resource interactions is an important research priority. Previous work on this topic has yielded conflicting outcomes with some studies predicting that warming should increase consumer-resource oscillations and others predicting that warming should decrease consumer-resource oscillations. 2. Here I develop a consumer-resource model that both synthesizes previous findings in a common framework and yields novel insights...

Data from: The splicing regulator PTBP2 controls a program of embryonic splicing required for neuronal maturation

Qin Li, Sika Zheng, Areum Han, Chia-Ho Lin, Peter Stoilov, Xiang-Dong Fu & Douglas L. Black
We show that the splicing regulator PTBP2 controls a genetic program essential for neuronal maturation. Depletion of PTBP2 in developing mouse cortex leads to degeneration of these tissues over the first three postnatal weeks, a time when the normal cortex expands and develops mature circuits. Cultured Ptbp2−/− neurons exhibit the same initial viability as wild type, with proper neurite outgrowth and marker expression. However, these mutant cells subsequently fail to mature and die after a...

Data from: Inferring heterogeneous evolutionary processes through time: from sequence substitution to phylogeography

Filip Bielejec, Philippe Lemey, Guy Baele, Andrew Rambaut & Marc A. Suchard
Molecular phylogenetic and phylogeographic reconstructions generally assume time-homogeneous substitution processes. Motivated by computational convenience, this assumption sacrifices biological realism and offers little opportunity to uncover the temporal dynamics in evolutionary histories. Here, we propose an evolutionary approach that explicitly relaxes the time-homogeneity assumption by allowing the specification of different infinitesimal substitution rate matrices across different time intervals, called epochs, along the evolutionary history. We focus on an epoch model implementation in a Bayesian inference framework...

Data from: The evolution of peafowl and other taxa with ocelli (eyespots): a phylogenomic approach

Keping Sun, Kelly A. Meiklejohn, Brant C. Faircloth, Travis C. Glenn, Edward L. Braun & Rebecca T. Kimball
The most striking feature of peafowl (Pavo) is the males' elaborate train, which exhibits ocelli (ornamental eyespots) that are under sexual selection. Two additional genera within the Phasianidae (Polyplectron and Argusianus) exhibit ocelli, but the appearance and location of these ornamental eyespots exhibit substantial variation among these genera, raising the question of whether ocelli are homologous. Within Polyplectron, ocelli are ancestral, suggesting ocelli may have evolved even earlier, prior to the divergence among genera. However,...

Data from: Mapping migration in a songbird using high-resolution genetic markers

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Kristina L. Paxton, Vanessa Apkenas, Sirena Lao, Rodney B. Siegel, David F. DeSante, Frank Moore, Thomas B. Smith & Kristen C. Ruegg
Neotropical migratory birds are declining across the Western Hemisphere, but conservation efforts have been hampered by the inability to assess where migrants are most limited – the breeding grounds, migratory stopover sites, or wintering areas. A major challenge has been the lack of an efficient, reliable, and broadly applicable method for measuring the strength of migratory connections between populations across the annual cycle. Here we show how high-resolution genetic markers can be used to identify...

Data from: Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

Trevor Bedford, Marc A. Suchard, Philippe Lemey, Gytis Dudas, Victoria Gregory, Alan J. Hay, John W. McCauley, Colin A. Russell, Derek J. Smith & Andrew Rambaut
Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata,...

Data from: Trait decoupling promotes evolutionary diversification of the trophic and acoustic system of damselfishes

Bruno Frédérich, Damien Olivier, Glenn Litsios, Michael E. Alfaro, Eric Parmentier & B. Frederich
Trait decoupling, wherein evolutionary release of constraints permits specialization of formerly integrated structures, represents a major conceptual framework for interpreting patterns of organismal diversity. However, few empirical tests of this hypothesis exist. A central prediction, that the tempo of morphological evolution and ecological diversification should increase following decoupling events, remains inadequately tested. In damselfishes (Pomacentridae), a ceratomandibular ligament links the hyoid bar and lower jaws, coupling two main morphofunctional units directly involved in both feeding...

Data from: New host and lineage diversity of avian haemosporidia in the Northern Andes

Ryan J. Harrigan, Raul Sedano, Anthony C. Chasar, Jaime A. Chaves, Jennifer T. Nguyen, Alexis Whitaker & Thomas B. Smith
The northern Andes, with their steep elevational and climate gradients, are home to an exceptional diversity of flora and fauna, particularly rich in avian species that have adapted to divergent ecological conditions. With this diversity comes the opportunity for parasites to exploit a wide breadth of avian hosts. However, little research has focused on examining the patterns of prevalence and lineage diversity of avian parasites in the Andes. Here, we screened a total of 428...

Data from: Phosphoprotein SAK1 is a regulator of acclimation to singlet oxygen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Setsuko Wakao, Brian L. Chin, Krishna K. Niyogi, Heidi K. Ledford, David Casero, Matteo Pellegrini, Rachel M. Dent & Sabeeha S. Merchant
Singlet oxygen is a highly toxic and inevitable byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of acclimating specifically to singlet oxygen stress, but the retrograde signaling pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus mediating this response is unknown. Here we describe a mutant, singlet oxygen acclimation knocked-out 1 (sak1), that lacks the acclimation response to singlet oxygen. Analysis of genome-wide changes in RNA abundance during acclimation to singlet oxygen revealed...

Data from: The static allometry of sexual and non-sexual traits in vervet monkeys

Rafael L. Rodríguez, Jennifer Danzy Cramer, Christopher A. Schmitt, Tegan J. Gaetano, J. Paul Grobler, Nelson B. Freimer & Trudy R. Turner
Sexual traits vary tremendously in static allometry. This variation may be explained in part by body size-related differences in the strength of selection. We tested this hypothesis in two populations of vervet monkeys, using estimates of the level of condition dependence for different morphological traits as a proxy for body size-related variation in the strength of selection. In support of the hypothesis, we found that the steepness of allometric slopes increased with the level of...

Data from: Speciation in Western Scrub-Jays, Haldane’s rule, and genetic clines in secondary contact

Fiona C. Gowen, James M. Maley, Carla Cicero, A. Townsend Peterson, Brant C. Faircloth, T. Caleb Warr & John E. McCormack
Background: Haldane’s Rule, the tendency for the heterogametic sex to show reduced fertility in hybrid crosses, can obscure the signal of gene flow in mtDNA between species where females are heterogametic. Therefore, it is important when studying speciation and species limits in female-heterogametic species like birds to assess the signature of gene flow in the nuclear genome as well. We studied introgression of microsatellites and mtDNA across a secondary contact zone between coastal and interior...

Data from: Interspecific aggression, not interspecific mating, drives character displacement in the wing colouration of male rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina)

Jonathan P. Drury & Gregory F. Grether
Traits that mediate intraspecific social interactions may overlap in closely related sympatric species, resulting in costly between-species interactions. Such interactions have principally interested investigators studying the evolution of reproductive isolation via reproductive character displacement (RCD) or reinforcement, yet in addition to reproductive interference, interspecific trait overlap can lead to costly between-species aggression. Previous research on rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.) demonstrated that sympatric shifts in male wing colour patterns and competitor recognition reduce interspecific aggression, supporting...

Data from: Validation of network communicability metrics for the analysis of brain structural networks.

Jennifer Andreotti, Kay Jann, Lester Melie-Garcia, Stéphanie Giezendanner, Eugenio Abela, Roland Wiest, Thomas Dierks & Andrea Federspiel
Computational network analysis provides new methods to analyze the brain's structural organization based on diffusion imaging tractography data. Networks are characterized by global and local metrics that have recently given promising insights into diagnosis and the further understanding of psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Most of these metrics are based on the idea that information in a network flows along the shortest paths. In contrast to this notion, communicability is a broader measure of connectivity which...

Data from: Genetic mapping of MAPK-mediated complex traits across S. cerevisiae

Sebastian Treusch, Frank W. Albert, Joshua S. Bloom, Iulia E. Kotenko & Leonid Kruglyak
Signaling pathways enable cells to sense and respond to their environment. Many cellular signaling strategies are conserved from fungi to humans, yet their activity and phenotypic consequences can vary extensively among individuals within a species. A systematic assessment of the impact of naturally occurring genetic variation on signaling pathways remains to be conducted. In S. cerevisiae, both response and resistance to stressors that activate signaling pathways differ between diverse isolates. Here, we present a quantitative...

Data from: Spatial and temporal patterns of frugivorous Hornbill movements in Central Africa and their implications for rain forest conservation

Anthony Chasar, Ryan J. Harrigan, Kimberly M. Holbrook, Thomas V. Dietsch, Trevon L. Fuller, Martin Wikelski & Thomas B. Smith
Tropical forest conservation and restoration require an understanding of the movements and habitat preferences of important seed dispersers. With forests now being altered at an unprecedented rate, avian frugivores are becoming increasingly vital for forest regeneration. Seed movement, however, is highly dependent on the behavioral characteristics of their dispersers. Here, we examined the movements, habitat preferences, and range sizes of two African frugivores: the Black-casqued (Ceratogymna atrata) and the White-thighed (Bycanistes albotibialis) Hornbill, in the...

Data from: What seeds tell us about birds: a multi-year analysis of acorn woodpecker foraging movements

Pamela G. Thompson, Peter E. Smouse, Douglas G. Scofield & Victoria L. Sork
Background: Foraging movements of animals shape their efficiency in finding food and their exposure to the environment while doing so. Our goal was to test the optimal foraging theory prediction that territorial acorn woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) should forage closer to their 'central place' in years of high resource availability and further afield when resources are less available. We used genetic data on acorns stored in caching sites (granaries) and adult trees for two oak species...

Data from: Disease and freeways drive genetic change in urban bobcat populations

Laurel E. K. Serieys, Amanda Lea, John P. Pollinger, Seth P. D. Riley & Robert K. Wayne
Urbanization profoundly impacts animal populations by causing isolation, increased susceptibility to disease, and exposure to toxicants. Genetic effects include reduced effective population size, increased population substructure, and decreased adaptive potential. We investigated the influence that urbanization and a disease epizootic had on the population genetics of bobcats (Lynx rufus) distributed across a highly fragmented urban landscape. We genotyped more than 300 bobcats, sampled from 1996-2012, for variation at nine neutral and seven immune gene-linked microsatellite...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • University of California Los Angeles
    20
  • University of California System
    2
  • National Institutes of Health
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • KU Leuven
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • University of the Free State
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Princeton University
    1