34 Works

Data from: Evolutionary change in testes tissue competition among experimental populations of house mice

Renée Claire Firman, Francisco Garcia-Gonzalez, Evan Tyler, Samantha Wheeler, Zayaputeri Yamin, Michael Yuan & Leigh W. Simmons
Theory assumes that postcopulatory sexual selection favours increased investment in testes size because greater numbers of sperm within the ejaculate increase the chance of success in sperm competition, and larger testes are able to produce more sperm. However, changes in the organization of the testes tissue may also affect sperm production rates. Indeed, recent comparative analyses suggest that sperm competition selects for greater proportions of sperm-producing tissue within the testes. Here, we explicitly test this...

Data from: Experimental evidence that the effectiveness of conservation biological control depends on landscape complexity

Mattias Jonsson, Cory S. Straub, Raphael K. Didham, Hannah L. Buckley, Bradley S. Case, Roddy J. Hale, Claudio Gratton & Steve D. Wratten
1. The expansion of intensive agricultural practices is a major threat to biodiversity and to the delivery of ecosystem services on which humans depend. Local-scale conservation management strategies, such as agri-environment schemes to preserve biodiversity, have been widely adopted to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural intensification. However, it is likely that the effectiveness of these local-scale management actions depend on the structure and composition of the surrounding landscape. 2. We experimentally tested the utility...

Data from: An endangered arboreal specialist, the western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis), shows a greater genetic divergence across a narrow artificial waterway than a major road

Kaori Yokochi, Winn Jason Kennington & Roberta Bencini
The fragmentation of habitats by roads and other artificial linear structures can have a profound effect on the movement of arboreal species due to their strong fidelity to canopies. Here, we used 12 microsatellite DNA loci to investigate the fine-scale spatial genetic structure and the effects of a major road and a narrow artificial waterway on a population of the endangered western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis) in Busselton, Western Australia. Using spatial autocorrelation analysis, we...

Data from: Genetic diversity loss in a biodiversity hotspot: ancient DNA quantifies genetic decline and former connectivity in a critically endangered marsupial.

Carlo Pacioni, Helen Hunt, Morten E. Allentoft, Timothy G. Vaughan, Adrian F. Wayne, Alexander Baynes, Dalal Haouchar, Joe Dortch & Michael Bunce
The extent of genetic diversity loss and former connectivity between fragmented populations are often unknown factors when studying endangered species. While genetic techniques are commonly applied in extant populations to assess temporal and spatial demographic changes, it is no substitute for directly measuring past diversity using ancient DNA (aDNA). We analysed both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear microsatellite loci from 64 historical fossil and skin samples of the critically endangered Western Australian woylie (Bettongia penicillata...

Data from: Investigating the genetic architecture of conditional strategies using the environmental threshold model

Bruno Buzatto, Mathieu Buoro, Wade Hazel, Joseph Tomkins, Bruno A. Buzatto, Joseph L. Tomkins & Wade N. Hazel
The threshold expression of dichotomous phenotypes that are environmentally cued or induced comprise the vast majority of phenotypic dimorphisms in color, morphology, behavior, and life history. Modeled as conditional strategies under the framework of evolutionary game theory, the quantitative genetic basis of these traits is a challenge to estimate. The challenge exists firstly because the phenotypic expression of the trait is dichotomous and secondly because the apparent environmental cue is separate from the biological signal...

Data from: Death by sex in an Australian icon: a continent-wide survey reveals extensive hybridization between dingoes and domestic dogs

Danielle Stephens, Alan N. Wilton, Peter J. S. Fleming, Oliver Berry & Peter J.S. Fleming
Hybridization between domesticated animals and their wild counterparts can disrupt adaptive gene combinations, reduce genetic diversity, extinguish wild populations and change ecosystem function. The dingo is a free-ranging dog that is an iconic apex predator and distributed throughout most of mainland Australia. Dingoes readily hybridize with domestic dogs, and in many Australian jurisdictions, distinct management strategies are dictated by hybrid status. Yet, the magnitude and spatial extent of domestic dog–dingo hybridization is poorly characterized. To...

Data from: Introgression threatens the survival of the critically endangered freshwater crayfish Cherax tenuimanus (Decapoda : Parastacidae) in the wild

Clodagh Guildea, Yvette Hitchen, Rodney Duffy, P. Joana Dias, Jason M. Ledger, Michael Snow & W. Jason Kennington
Hybridization and genetic introgression following the introduction of exotic species can pose a significant threat to the survival of geographically restricted species. A remnant population of the critically endangered freshwater crayfish Cherax tenuimanus in the upper reaches of the Margaret River in southwestern Australia is under threat following the introduction and spread of its congener Cherax cainii. Here, we examine the extent of hybridization and introgression between the two species using twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci....

Data from: Genome-environment associations in sorghum landraces predict adaptive traits

Jesse R. Lasky, Hari D. Upadhyaya, Punna Ramu, Santosh Deshpande, C. Tom Hash, Jason Bonnette, Thomas E. Juenger, Katie Hyma, Charlotte Acharya, Sharon E. Mitchell, Edward S. Buckler, Zachary Brenton, Stephen Kresovich & Geoffrey P. Morris
Improving environmental adaptation in crops is essential for food security under global change, but phenotyping adaptive traits remains a major bottleneck. If associations between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles and environment of origin in crop landraces reflect adaptation, then these could be used to predict phenotypic variation for adaptive traits. We tested this proposition in the global food crop Sorghum bicolor, characterizing 1943 georeferenced landraces at 404,627 SNPs and quantifying allelic associations with bioclimatic and soil...

Data from: Male butterflies use an anti-aphrodisiac pheromone to tailor ejaculates

Helena Larsdotter-Mellström, Kerstin Eriksson, Niklas Janz, Sören Nylin & Mikael A. Carlsson
1. When females mate with multiple partners, the risk of sperm competition depends on female mating history. To maximize fitness, males should adjust their mating investment according to this risk. In polyandrous butterflies males transfer a large, nutritious ejaculate at mating. Larger ejaculates delay female remating and confer an advantage in sperm competition. 2. We test if male ejaculate size in the butterfly Pieris napi (Lepidoptera) varies with female mating history and thus sperm competition,...

Data from: No evidence for a trade-off between sperm length and male premating weaponry

Stefan Lüpold, Leigh W. Simmons, Joseph L. Tomkins & John L. Fitzpatrick
Male ornaments and armaments that mediate success in mate acquisition and ejaculate traits influencing competitive fertilization success are under intense sexual selection. However, relative investment in these pre- and postcopulatory traits depends on the relative importance of either selection episode and on the energetic costs and fitness gains of investing in these traits. Theoretical and empirical work has improved our understanding of how precopulatory sexual traits and investments in sperm production covary in this context....

Data from: Sperm competition and the evolution of precopulatory weapons: Increasing male density promotes sperm competition and reduces selection on arm strength in a chorusing frog

Bruno Alves Buzatto, J. Dale Roberts & Leigh W. Simmons
Sperm competition theory assumes a trade-off between precopulatory traits that increase mating success and postcopulatory traits that increase fertilization success. Predictions for how sperm competition might affect male expenditure on these traits depend on the number of competing males, the advantage gained from expenditure on weapons, and the level of sperm competition. However, empirical tests of sperm competition theory rarely examine precopulatory male expenditure. We investigated how variation in male density affects precopulatory sexual selection...

Data from: Isolation by resistance across a complex coral reef seascape

Luke Thomas, W. Jason Kennington, Michael Stat, Shaun P. Wilkinson, Jonathan T. Kool & Gary A. Kendrick
A detailed understanding of the genetic structure of populations and an accurate interpretation of processes driving contemporary patterns of gene flow are fundamental to successful spatial conservation management. The field of seascape genetics seeks to incorporate environmental variables and processes into analyses of population genetic data to improve our understanding of forces driving genetic divergence in the marine environment. Information about barriers to gene flow (such as ocean currents) is used to define a resistance...

Data from: Stress induced gene expression drives transient DNA methylation changes at adjacent repetitive elements

David Secco, Chuang Wang, Huixia Shou, Matthew D. Schultz, Serge Chiarenza, Laurent Nussaume, Joseph R. Ecker, James Whelan & Ryan Lister
Cytosine DNA methylation (mC) is a genome modification that can regulate the expression of coding and non-coding genetic elements. However, little is known about the involvement of mC in response to environmental cues. Using whole genome bisulfite sequencing to assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of mC in rice grown under phosphate starvation and recovery conditions, we identified widespread phosphate starvation-induced changes in mC, preferentially localized in transposable elements (TEs) close to highly induced genes. These changes...

Data from: Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

Megan L. Coghlan, Garth Maker, Elly Crighton, James Haile, Dáithí C. Murray, Nicole E. White, Roger W. Byard, Matthew I. Bellgard, Ian Mullaney, Robert Trengove, Richard J. N. Allcock, Christine Nash, Claire Hoban, Kevin Jarrett, Ross Edwards, Ian F. Musgrave & Michael Bunce
Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological...

Data from: Directional selection for flowering time leads to adaptive evolution in Raphanus raphanistrum (Wild radish)

Michael B. Ashworth, Michael J. Walsh, Kenneth C. Flower, Martin M. Vila-Aiub, Stephen B. Powles & Ken C. Flower
Herbicides have been the primary tool for controlling large populations of yield depleting weeds from agro-ecosystems, resulting in the evolution of widespread herbicide resistance. In response, nonherbicidal techniques have been developed which intercept weed seeds at harvest before they enter the soil seed bank. However, the efficiency of these techniques allows an intense selection for any trait that enables weeds to evade collection, with early-flowering ecotypes considered likely to result in early seed shedding. Using...

Data from: Elucidating steroid alkaloid biosynthesis in Veratrum californicum: production of verazine in Sf9 cells

Megan M. Augustin, Dan R. Ruzicka, Ashutosh K. Shukla, Courtney M. Starks, Mark O'Neil-Johnson, Michael R. McKain, Bradley S. Evans, Matthew D. Barrett, Ann Smithson, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Michael K. Deyholos, Patrick P. Edger, J. Chris Pires, James H. Leebens-Mack, Dave A. Mann, Toni M. Kutchan & Matt D. Barrett
Steroid alkaloids have been shown to elicit a wide range of pharmacological effects that include anticancer and antifungal activities. Understanding the biosynthesis of these molecules is essential to bioengineering for sustainable production. Herein, we investigate the biosynthetic pathway to cyclopamine, a steroid alkaloid that shows promising antineoplastic activities. Supply of cyclopamine is limited, as the current source is solely derived from wild collection of the plant Veratrum californicum. To elucidate the early stages of the...

Data from: High-throughput genotyping for species identification and diversity assessment in germplasm collections

Annaliese S. Mason, Jing Zhang, Reece Tollenaere, Paula Vasquez Teuber, Jessica Dalton-Morgan, Liyong Hu, Guijun Yan, David Edwards, Robert Redden & Jacqueline Batley
Germplasm collections provide an extremely valuable resource for breeders and researchers. However, misclassification of accessions by species often hinders the effective use of these collections. We propose that use of high-throughput genotyping tools can provide a fast, efficient and cost-effective way of confirming species in germplasm collections, as well as providing valuable genetic diversity data. We genotyped 180 Brassicaceae samples sourced from the Australian Grains Genebank across the recently released Illumina Infinium Brassica 60K SNP...

Data from: Intralocus tactical conflict: genetic correlations between fighters and sneakers of the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus

Bruno A. Buzatto, Janne S. Kotiaho, Joseph L. Tomkins & Leigh W. Simmons
Males and females differ in their phenotypic optima for many traits, and since the majority of genes are expressed in both sexes, some alleles can be beneficial to one sex but harmful to the other (intralocus sexual conflict; ISC). ISC theory has recently been extended to intrasexual dimorphisms, where certain alleles may have opposite effects on the fitness of males of different morphs that employ alternative reproductive tactics (intralocus tactical conflict; ITC). Here we use...

Data from: The journey from traffic offender to severe road trauma victim: destiny or preventive opportunity?

Kwok-Ming Ho, Sudhakar Rao, Maxine Burrell, Tarun S. Weeramanthri & Kwok M. Ho
Background: Road trauma is a leading cause of death and injury in young people. Traffic offences are common, but their importance as a risk indicator for subsequent road trauma is unknown. This cohort study assessed whether severe road trauma could be predicted by a history of prior traffic offences. Methodology and Principal Findings: Clinical data of all adult road trauma patients admitted to the Western Australia (WA) State Trauma Centre between 1998 and 2013 were...

Data from: Dissecting molecular evolution in the highly diverse plant clade Caryophyllales using transcriptome sequencing

Ya Yang, Michael J. Moore, Samuel F. Brockington, Douglas E. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Eric J. Carpenter, Yong Zhang, Li Chen, Zhixiang Yan, Yinlong Xie, Rowan F. Sage, Sarah Covshoff, Julian M. Hibberd, Matthew N. Nelson & Stephen A. Smith
Many phylogenomic studies based on transcriptomes have been limited to “single-copy” genes due to methodological challenges in homology and orthology inferences. Only a relatively small number of studies have explored analyses beyond reconstructing species relationships. We sampled 69 transcriptomes in the hyperdiverse plant clade Caryophyllales and 27 outgroups from annotated genomes across eudicots. Using a combined similarity- and phylogenetic tree-based approach, we recovered 10,960 homolog groups, where each was represented by at least eight ingroup...

Data from: MHC-similarity and sexual selection: different doesn't always mean attractive

Clelia Gasparini, Leonardo Congiu & Andrea Pilastro
Females that mate multiply have the possibility to exert postcopulatory choice and select more compatible sperm to fertilize eggs. Prior work suggests that dissimilarity in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in determining genetic compatibility between partners. Favouring a partner with dissimilar MHC alleles would result in offspring with high MHC diversity and therefore with enhanced survival thanks to increased resistance to pathogens and parasites. The high variability of MHC genes may further...

Data from: Perennial growth of hermatypic corals at Rottnest Island, Western Australia (32°S)

Claire L. Ross, James L. Falter, Verena Schoepf & Malcolm T. McCulloch
To assess the viability of high latitude environments as coral refugia, we report measurements of seasonal changes in seawater parameters (temperature, light, and carbonate chemistry) together with calcification rates for two coral species, Acropora yongei and Pocillopora damicornis from the southernmost geographical limit of these species at Salmon Bay, Rottnest Island (32°S) in Western Australia. Changes in buoyant weight were normalised to colony surface areas as determined from both X-ray computed tomography and geometric estimation....

Data from: Mismatch in the distribution of floral ecotypes and pollinators: insights into the evolution of sexually deceptive orchids

Ryan D. Phillips, Bjorn Bohman, Janet M. Anthony, Siegfried L. Krauss, Kingsley W. Dixon & Rod Peakall
Plants are predicted to show floral adaptation to geographic variation in the most effective pollinator, potentially leading to reproductive isolation and genetic divergence. Many sexually deceptive orchids attract just a single pollinator species, limiting opportunities to experimentally investigate pollinator switching. Here we investigate Drakaea concolor, which attracts two pollinator species. Using pollinator choice tests, we detected two morphologically similar ecotypes within D. concolor. The common ecotype only attracted Zaspilothynnus gilesi, while the rare ecotype also...

Data from: The rise and fall of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal diversity during ecosystem retrogression

Manuela Krüger, François P. Teste, Etienne Laliberté, Hans Lambers, Megan Coghlan, Graham Zemunik & Michael Bunce
Ecosystem retrogression following long-term pedogenesis is attributed to phosphorus (P) limitation of primary productivity. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance P acquisition for most terrestrial plants, but it has been suggested that this strategy becomes less effective in strongly weathered soils with extremely low P availability. Using next generation sequencing of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene in roots and soil, we compared the composition and diversity of AMF communities in three contrasting stages of a...

Data from: Varying levels of clonality and ploidy create barriers to gene flow and challenges for conservation of an Australian arid-zone ecosystem engineer, Acacia loderi

David G. Roberts, Cairo N. Forrest, Andrew J. Denham & David J. Ayre
Acacia loderi, the ecosystem engineer of the endangered Acacia loderi Shrublands in arid eastern Australia, spans a persistent (> 15 000 year) but poorly studied landscape feature, the Darling River. We investigated the genetic structure of 19 stands of eight to > 1000 plants separated by < 300 km to test for variation in life histories between semi-arid and arid stands to the east and west of the Darling River, respectively. Eight of nine stands...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of Western Australia
    34
  • Curtin University
    4
  • Murdoch University
    3
  • La Trobe University
    3
  • Zhejiang University
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • Department of Parks and Wildlife
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Padua
    1