11 Works

Data from: Genomic predictions and genome-wide association study of resistance against Piscirickettsia salmonis in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) using ddRAD sequencing

Agustin Barría, Kris A. Christensen, Grazyella M. Yoshida, Katharina Correa, Ana Jedlicki, Jean Paul Lhorente, William S. Davidson & José Manuel Yáñez
Piscirickettsia salmonis is one of the main infectious diseases affecting coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) farming, and current treatments have been ineffective for the control of this disease. Genetic improvement for P. salmonis resistance has been proposed as a feasible alternative for the control of this infectious disease in farmed fish. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) strategies allow genotyping of hundreds of individuals with thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which can be used to perform genome...

Data from: The most effective pollinator principle applies to new invasive pollinators

Rodrigo Medel, Catalina Gonzalez-Browne, Daniela Salazar, Pedro Ferrer & Mildred Ehrenfeld
G.L. Stebbins’ most effective pollinator principle states that when pollinators are not limiting, plants are expected to specialize and adapt to the more abundant and effective pollinator species available. In this study, we quantify the effectiveness of bees, hummingbirds and hawkmoths in a Chilean population of Erythranthe lutea (Phrymaceae), and examine whether flower traits are subject to pollinator-mediated selection by the most effective pollinator species during two consecutive years. Unlike most species in the pollinator...

Data from: Thorson’s rule, life history evolution and diversification of benthic octopuses (Cephalopoda: Octopodoidea)

Christian M. Ibáñez, Enrico L. Rezende, Roger D. Sepúlveda, Jorge Avaria-Llautureo, Cristián E. Hernández, Javier Sellanes, Elie Poulin & María Cecilia Pardo-Gandarillas
Here we evaluate the so-called Thorson’s rule, which posits that direct-development and larger eggs are favored towards the poles in marine organisms and whose validity been the subject of considerable debate in the literature, combining an expanded phenotypic dataset encompassing 60 species of benthic octopuses with a new molecular phylogeny. Phylogenetic reconstruction shows two clades: clade 1 including species of the families Eledonidae, Megaleledonidae, Bathypolypodidae and Enteroctopodidae, and clade 2 including species of Octopodidae. Egg...

Data from: Coordinated species importation policies are needed to reduce serious invasions globally: the case of alien bumblebees in South America

Marcelo A. Aizen, Cecilia Smith-Ramirez, Carolina L. Morales, Lorena Vieli, Agustín Sáez, Rodrigo M. Barahona-Segovia, Marina P. Arbetman, José Montalva, Lucas A. Garibaldi, David W. Inouye & Lawrence D. Harder
The global trade of species promotes diverse human activities but also facilitates the introduction of potentially invasive species into new environments. As species ignore national boundaries, unilateral national decisions concerning species trade set the stage for transnational species invasion with significant conservation, economic and political consequences. The need for a coordinated approach to species importation policies is demonstrated by the introduction of two bumblebee species into Chile for crop pollination, despite Argentina banning commercial importation...

Data from: Testing the effects of heterozygosity on growth rate plasticity in the seaweed Gracilaria chilensis (Rhodophyta)

Cristobal F. Gallegos Sanchez, Jessica Beltrán, Verónica Flores, Alejandra V. González & Bernabé Santelices
Heterozygosity has been positively associated with fitness and population survival. However, the relationship between heterozygosity and adaptive phenotypic plasticity (i.e., plasticity which results in fitness homeostasis or improvement in changing environments), is unclear and has been poorly explored in seaweeds. In this study, we explored this relationship in the clonal red seaweed, Gracilaria chilensis by conducting three growth rate plasticity experiments under contrasting salinity conditions and by measuring heterozygosity with five microsatellite DNA markers. Firstly,...

Data from: Ovule bet‐hedging at high elevation in the South American Andes: evidence from a phylogenetically‐controlled multispecies study

Mary T. K. Arroyo, Fernanda Perez, Paola Jara-Arancio, Diego Pacheco, Paula Vidal & María Francisca Flores
1. How animal‐pollinated plants support low and stochastic pollination in the high alpine is a key question in plant ecology. The ovule bet‐hedging hypothesis proposes compensation for stochastic pollination via ovule oversupply ín flowers allowing the benefits of windfall pollination events to be reaped. Under this hypothesis, ovule number is expected to increase from treeline upward on high mountains characterized by steep declines in flower visitation rates and increasingly more variable pollination. 2. Ovule/floret number...

Data from: Comparing genomic signatures of domestication in two Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) populations with different geographical origins

Maria E. Lopez, Laura Benestan, Jean-Sebastien Moore, Charles Perrier, John Gilbey, Alex Di Genova, Alejandro Maass, Diego Díaz, Jean-Paul Lhorente, Katharina Correa, Roberto Neira, Louis Bernatchez & José M. Yáñez
Selective breeding and genetic improvement have left detectable signatures on the genomes of domestic species. The elucidation of such signatures is fundamental for detecting genomic regions of biological relevance to domestication and improving management practices. In aquaculture, domestication was carried out independently in different locations worldwide, which provides opportunities to study the parallel effects of domestication on the genome of individuals that have been selected for similar traits. In the present study, we aimed to...

Data from: A down-shifting Eu 3+ -doped Y 2 WO 6 /TiO 2 photoelectrode for improved light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells

Jaime Llanos, Ivan Brito, Dario Espinoza, Ramkumar Sekar & Paulraj Manidurai
Y1.86Eu0.14WO6 phosphors were prepared using a solid-state reaction method. Their optical properties were analysed, and they was mixed with TiO2, sintered, and used as a photoelectrode (PE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The as-prepared photoelectrode was characterized by photoluminescence spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray diffraction. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of the DSSC with TiO2:Y1.86Eu0.14WO6 (100:2.5) was 25.8% higher than that of a DSCC using pure TiO2 as PE. This high efficiency...

Data from: Genomic variation underlying complex life history traits revealed by genome sequencing in Chinook salmon

Shawn R. Narum, Alex Di Genova, Steven J. Micheletti, Alejandro Mass & Alejandro Maass
A broad portfolio of phenotypic diversity in natural organisms can buffer against exploitation and increase species persistence in disturbed ecosystems. The study of genomic variation that accounts for ecological and evolutionary adaptation can represent a powerful approach to extend understanding of phenotypic variation in nature. Here we present a chromosome-level reference genome assembly for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; 2.36 Gb) that enabled association mapping of life history variation and phenotypic traits for this species. Whole...

Data from: Severity of impacts of an introduced species corresponds with regional eco-evolutionary experience

Kimberley T. Davis, Ragan M. Callaway, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Martin A Nunez, Rob W Brooker, Bruce D. Maxwell, Romina D Dimarco, Duane A Peltzer, Bill Mason, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Anne C S McIntosh, Robin J Pakeman, Alyssa Laney Smith & Michael Gundale
Invasive plant impacts vary widely across introduced ranges. We tested the hypothesis that differences in the eco-evolutionary experience of native communities with the invader correspond with the impacts of invasive species on native vegetation, with impacts increasing with ecological novelty. We compared plant species richness and composition beneath Pinus contorta to that in adjacent vegetation and other P. contorta stands across a network of sites in its native (Canada and USA) and non-native (Argentina, Chile,...

Data from: Human paths have positive impacts on plant richness and diversity: a meta-analysis

Meredith Root-Bernstein & Jens-Christian Svenning
We assess the impacts of human paths, trails and roads on plant species richness and Shannon diversity. Most reviews of this topic have not considered community-level measures, and have focused on excessive tourism impacts. We found significant positive effects of paths on plant richness and diversity. The effect size for richness was highest when studies included roads (paved) or trails (unpaved). The effect size found for diversity was highest when studies were in grasslands. We...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University of Chile
    11
  • University Austral de Chile
    2
  • Catholic University of the North
    2
  • National University of Comahue
    2
  • University of Concepción
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Alberta
    1
  • Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission
    1
  • Northern Research Station
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1