69 Works

Data from: A Turing Test for Collective Motion

James E. Herbert-Read, Maksym Romenskyy & David J. T. Sumpter
A widespread problem in biological research is assessing whether a model adequately describes some real-world data. But even if a model captures the large-scale statistical properties of the data, should we be satisfied with it? We developed a method, inspired by Alan Turing, to assess the effectiveness of model fitting. We first built a self-propelled particle model whose properties (order and cohesion) statistically matched those of real fish schools. We then asked members of the...

Data from: Different DMRT3 genotypes are best adapted for harness racing and riding in Finnhorses

Kim Jäderkvist Fegraeus, Lisa Johansson, Minna Mäenpää, Anna Mykkänen, Lisa S. Andersson, Brandon D. Velie, Leif Andersson, Thorvaldur Árnason & Gabriella Lindgren
Previous studies showed a positive effect of the DMRT3 “gait keeper” mutation on harness racing performance in Standardbreds, French-, and Nordic trotters. The mutation has also been shown to influence riding traits in multiple breeds. This study investigated the effect of the DMRT3 mutation on harness racing performance and riding traits in Finnhorses. Finnhorses used for harness racing (n = 180) and for riding (n = 59) were genotyped for the DMRT3 mutation. For the...

Data from: The oldest notostracan (Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium)

Linda Lagebro, Pierre Gueriau, Thomas A. Hegna, Nicolas Rabet, Aodhán D. Butler & Graham E. Budd
A new notostracan crustacean, Strudops goldenbergi gen. et sp. nov., is described from the well-preserved terrestrial arthropod fauna of the Upper Devonian of Strud, Belgium. The fossil notostracan bears a close resemblance to modern notostracans in possessing a large, simple head shield covering almost half of the whole body, a set of phyllopodous thoracic appendages and a legless posterior abdomen with a telson bearing a caudal furca. The differentiation and relative size of mouthparts and...

Data from: Time constraint effects on phenology and life history synchrony in a damselfly along a latitudinal gradient

Szymon Śniegula, Maria J. Gołąb & Frank Johansson
In organisms with complex life cycles living in seasonal environments, the synchronisation of phenological events is important from the ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Life history transitions should be synchronised to a greater degree at northern latitudes. We quantified hatching and emergence timing and synchrony in the obligate univoltine damselfly Lestes sponsa along a latitudinal gradient covering its entire north–south range in Europe. In our first experiment, populations from different latitudes were grown in separate climate...

Data from: Characterization of the placoderm (Gnathostomata) assemblage from the tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud (Belgium, Upper Famennian)

Sébastien Olive, Gaël Clément, Edward B. Daeschler & Vincent Dupret
The placoderm fauna of the late Famennian tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud, Belgium, is studied on the basis of historical and newly collected material. It includes the previously described antiarch Grossilepis rikiki, the groenlandaspidid Turrisaspis strudensis sp. nov. and the actinolepidoideid Phyllolepis undulata. P. undulata is thoroughly described and joins the list of the valid Phyllolepis species confidently diagnosed. A morphometrical analysis performed on the centronuchal and anterior ventrolateral plates of the Phyllolepis material demonstrates that...

Data from: Spatio-temporal dynamics of impulse responses to figure motion in optic flow neurons

Yu-Jen Lee, Olof H. Jönsson & Karin Nordström
White noise techniques have been used widely to investigate sensory systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates. White noise stimuli are powerful in their ability to rapidly generate data that help the experimenter decipher the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural and behavioral responses. One type of white noise stimuli, maximal length shift register sequences (m-sequences), have recently become particularly popular for extracting response kernels in insect motion vision. We here use such m-sequences to extract the impulse...

Data from: Temporal variation of Bistorta vivipara-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in the High Arctic

Sunil Mundra, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Håvard Kauserud, Rune Halvorsen, Pernille Eidesen & Pernille Bronken Eidesen
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are important for efficient nutrient uptake of several widespread arctic plant species. Knowledge of temporal variation of ECM fungi, and the relationship of these patterns to environmental variables, is essential to understand energy and nutrient cycling in Arctic ecosystems. We sampled roots of Bistorta vivipara ten times over two years; three times during the growing-season (June, July and September) and twice during winter (November and April) of both years. We found 668...

Data from: Hysteretic dynamics of active particles in a periodic orienting field

Maksym Romensky, Dimitri Scholz & Vladimir Lobaskin
Active motion of living organisms and artificial self-propelling particles has been an area of intense research at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics. Significant progress in understanding these phenomena has been related to the observation that dynamic self-organization in active systems has much in common with ordering in equilibrium condensed matter such as spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. The velocities of active particles may behave similar to magnetic dipoles and develop global alignment, although interactions...

Data from: The dipnoan buccal pump reconstructed in 3D and implications for air breathing in Devonian lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, John A. Long, Paul Tafforeau & Per E. Ahlberg
Lungfishes are known for, and indeed take their name from, their bimodal respiratory abilities. All three extant genera can use their lungs to extract oxygen from the atmosphere, although their reliance upon this capability differs among taxa. Lungs are considered primitive for the Osteichthyes, however the distinctive buccal pump mode of air gulping exhibited by extant lungfishes appears to be a specialization. It is associated with a number of derived skeletal characters (cranial ribs, long...

Data from: Disruption of memory reconsolidation erases a fear memory trace in the human amygdala: An 18-month follow-up

Johannes Björkstrand, Thomas Agren, Andreas Frick, Jonas Engman, Elna-Marie Larsson, Tomas Furmark & Mats Fredrikson
Fear memories can be attenuated by reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we recently showed that reactivation and reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory trace in the basolateral amygdala predicts subsequent fear expression over two days, while reactivation followed by disrupted reconsolidation abolishes the memory trace and suppresses fear. In this follow-up study we demonstrate that the behavioral effect persists over 18 months reflected in superior reacquisition after undisrupted, as compared...

Data from: A draft fur seal genome provides insights into factors affecting SNP validation and how to mitigate them

E. Humble, A. Martinez-Barrio, J. Forcada, P.N. Trathan, M.A.S. Thorne, M. Hoffmann, J. B. W. Wolf, J.I. Hoffman, J. I. Hoffman, P. N. Trathan & M. A. S. Thorne
Custom genotyping arrays provide a flexible and accurate means of genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large number of individuals of essentially any organism. However, validation rates, defined as the proportion of putative SNPs that are verified to be polymorphic in a population, are often very low. A number of potential causes of assay failure have been identified, but none have been explored systematically. In particular, as SNPs are often developed from transcriptomes, parameters...

Data from: Relaxed predation results in reduced phenotypic integration in a suite of dragonflies

Dirk Johannes Mikolajewski, Linda Rüsen, Rüdiger Mauersberger, Frank Johansson & Jens Rolff
While changes in magnitude of single traits responding to selective agents have been studied intensively, little is known about selection shaping networks of traits and their patterns of co-variation. However, this is central for our understanding of phenotypic evolution since traits are embedded in a multivariate environment with selection affecting a multitude of traits simultaneously rather than individually. Here, we investigate inter- and intraspecific patterns of trait integration (trait correlations) in the larval abdomen of...

Data from: Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation

Alex Richter-Boix, Marco Katzenberger, Helder Duarte, María Quintela, Miguel Tejedo & Anssi Laurila
While temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve (TPC) and critical thermal maximum (CTmax)) and life history (thermal developmental reaction norms (TDRN)) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the...

Data from: Emotion reactivity is increased 4-6 weeks postpartum in healthy women: a longitudinal fMRI study

Malin Gingnell, Elin Bannbers, Harmen Moes, Jonas Engman, Sara Sylvén, Alkistis Skalkidou, Kristiina Kask, Johan Wikström & Inger Sundström-Poromaa
Marked endocrine alterations occur after delivery. Most women cope well with these changes, but the postpartum period is associated with an increased risk of depressive episodes. Previous studies of emotion processing have focused on maternal–infant bonding or postpartum depression (PPD), and longitudinal studies of the neural correlates of emotion processing throughout the postpartum period in healthy women are lacking. In this study, 13 women, without signs of post partum depression, underwent fMRI with an emotional...

Data from: Non-linear costs of reproduction in a long-lived plant

Nina Sletvold & Jon Ågren
A trade-off between current reproduction and future performance is a key component of life-history theory, but the shape of this trade-off for any specific fitness component remains elusive. We induced 3-5 levels of reproductive effort (RE) by manipulating fruit set of a long-lived orchid in two populations that differed in the length of the growing season and local climate, and examined survival, size and fecundity the following year. Natural fruit set was 72% higher in...

Data from: The population demography of Betula maximowicziana, a cool temperate tree species in Japan, in relation to the last glacial period: Its admixture-like genetic structure is the result of simple population splitting not admixing

Yoshiaki T. Tsuda, Katsuhiro N. Nakao, Yuji I. Ide, Yoshihiko T. Tsumura, Y. Tsuda, Y. Tsumura & K. Nakao
Conservation of the local genetic variation and evolutionary integrity of economically and ecologically important trees is a key aspect of studies involving forest genetics, and a population demographic history of the target species provides valuable information for this purpose. Here, the genetic structure of 48 populations of Betula maximowicziana was assessed using 12 expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers. Genetic diversity was lower in northern populations than southern ones and structure analysis revealed three...

Data from: Effects of mating order and male size on embryo survival in a pipefish

Ines Braga Goncalves, Kenyon B. Mobley, Ingrid Ahnesjö, Gry Sagebakken, Adam G. Jones & Charlotta Kvarnemo
In species that provide parental care, individuals should invest adaptively in their offspring in relation to the pre- and post-zygotic care provided by their partners. In the broad-nosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle L., females transfer large, nutrient-rich eggs into the male brood pouch during mating. The male broods and nourishes the embryos for several weeks before independent juveniles emerge at parturition. Given a choice, females clearly prefer large partners. Yet, females provide protein-richer eggs when the...

Data from: The nature of nurture in a wild mammal’s fitness

S. Eryn McFarlane, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, Murray M. Humphries, Stan Boutin & Andrew G. McAdam
Genetic variation in fitness is required for the adaptive evolution of any trait but natural selection is thought to erode genetic variance in fitness. This paradox has motivated the search for mechanisms that might maintain a population's adaptive potential. Mothers make many contributions to the attributes of their developing offspring and these maternal effects can influence responses to natural selection if maternal effects are themselves heritable. Maternal genetic effects (MGEs) on fitness might, therefore, represent...

Data from: Exploring microbial dark matter to resolve the deep archaeal ancestry of eukaryotes

Jimmy H. Saw, Anja Spang, Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Lina Juzokaite, Jeremy A. Dodsworth, Senthil Murugapiran, Dan R. Colman, Cristina Takacs-Vesbach, Brian P. Hedlund, Lionel Guy & Thijs J.G. Ettema
The origin of eukaryotes represents an enigmatic puzzle, which is still lacking a number of essential pieces. Whereas it is currently accepted that the process of eukaryogenesis involved an interplay between a host cell and an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont, we currently lack detailed information regarding the identity and nature of these players. A number of studies have provided increasing support for the emergence of the eukaryotic host cell from within the archaeal domain of life, displaying...

Data from: The evolution of sex chromosomes in organisms with separate haploid sexes

Simone Immler & Sarah Perin Otto
The evolution of dimorphic sex chromosomes is driven largely by the evolution of reduced recombination and the subsequent accumulation of deleterious mutations. While these processes are increasingly well understood in diploid organisms, the evolution of dimorphic sex chromosomes in haploid organisms (U/V) has been virtually unstudied theoretically. We analyze a model to investigate the evolution of linkage between fitness loci and the sex-determining region in U/V species. In a second step, we test how prone...

Data from: Brain – endocast relationship in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, elucidated from tomographic data (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi)

Alice M. Clement, Johan Nysjö, Robin Strand & Per E. Ahlberg
Although the brains of the three extant lungfish genera have been previously described, the spatial relationship between the brain and the neurocranium has never before been fully described nor quantified. Through the application of virtual microtomography (μCT) and 3D rendering software, we describe aspects of the gross anatomy of the brain and labyrinth region in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri and compare this to previous accounts. Unexpected characters in this specimen include short olfactory peduncles...

Data from: Geographic and temporal dynamics of a global radiation and diversification in the killer whale

Phillip A. Morin, Kim M. Parsons, Frederick I. Archer, María C. Ávila-Arcos, Lance G. Barrett-Lennard, Luciano Dalla Rosa, Sebastián Duchêne, John W. Durban, Graeme M. Ellis, Steven H. Ferguson, John K. Ford, Michael J. Ford, Cristina Gabrilao, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Kristin Kaschner, Craig O. Matkin, Stephen D. Petersen, Kelly M. Robertson, Ingrid N. Visser, Paul R. Wade, Simon Y. W. Ho & Andrew D. Foote
Global climate change during the Late Pleistocene periodically encroached and then released habitat during the glacial cycles, causing range expansions and contractions in some species. These dynamics have played a major role in geographic radiations, diversification and speciation. We investigate these dynamics in the most widely distributed of marine mammals, the killer whale (Orcinus orca), using a global data set of over 450 samples. This marine top predator inhabits coastal and pelagic ecosystems ranging from...

Data from: Resolving evolutionary relationships in closely related species with whole-genome sequencing data

Alexander Nater, Reto Burri, Takeshi Kawakami, Linnéa Smeds & Hans Ellegren
Using genetic data to resolve the evolutionary relationships of species is of major interest in evolutionary and systematic biology. However, reconstructing the sequence of speciation events, the so-called species tree, in closely related and potentially hybridizing species is very challenging. Processes such as incomplete lineage sorting and interspecific gene flow result in local gene genealogies that differ in their topology from the species tree, and analyses of few loci with a single sequence per species...

Data from: Auxotrophy and intra-population complementary in the 'interactome' of a cultivated freshwater model community

Sarahi L. Garcia, Moritz Buck, Katherine D. McMahon, Hans-Peter Grossart, Alexander Eiler & Falk Warnecke
Microorganisms are usually studied either in highly complex natural communities or in isolation as monoclonal model populations that we manage to grow in the laboratory. Here, we uncover the biology of some of the most common and yet-uncultured bacteria in freshwater environments using a mixed culture from Lake Grosse Fuchskuhle. From a single shotgun metagenome of a freshwater mixed culture of low complexity, we recovered four high-quality metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) for metabolic reconstruction. This analysis...

Data from: Genomic signature of successful colonization of Eurasia by the allopolyploid shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris)

Amandine Cornille, Adriana Salcedo, Dmytro Kryvokhyzha, Sylvain Glémin, Kalle Holm, Stephen Wright & Martin Lascoux
Polyploidization is a dominant feature of flowering plant evolution. However, detailed genomic analyses of the inter-population diversification of polyploids following genome duplication are still in their infancy, mainly because of methodological limits, both in terms of sequencing and computational analyses. The shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) is one of the most common weed species in the world. It is highly self-fertilizing, and recent genomic data indicate that it is an allopolyploid, resulting from hybridization between the...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    69

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    69

Affiliations

  • Uppsala University
    69
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    7
  • University of Zurich
    5
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • Bielefeld University
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • Ghent University
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2