61 Works

Data from: Strong sexual selection in males against a mutation load that reduces offspring production in seed beetles

Karl Grieshop, Josefine Stångberg, Ivain Martinossi-Allibert, Göran Arnqvist & David Berger
Theory predicts that sexual reproduction can increase population viability relative to asexual reproduction by allowing sexual selection in males to remove deleterious mutations from the population without large demographic costs. This requires that selection acts more strongly in males than females and that mutations affecting male reproductive success have pleiotropic effects on population productivity, but empirical support for these assumptions is mixed. We used the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus to implement a three-generation breeding design...

Data from: Evolution under dietary restriction increases male reproductive performance without survival cost

Felix Zajitschek, Susanne R. K. Zajitschek, Cindy Canton, Grigorios Georgolopoulos, Urban Friberg & Alexei A. Maklakov
Dietary restriction (DR), a reduction in nutrient intake without malnutrition, is the most reproducible way to extend lifespan in a wide range of organisms across the tree of life, yet the evolutionary underpinnings of the DR effect on lifespan are still widely debated. The leading theory suggests that this effect is adaptive and results from reallocation of resources from reproduction to somatic maintenance in order to survive periods of famine in nature. However, such response...

Data from: Genomic distribution and estimation of nucleotide diversity in natural populations: perspectives from the collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) genome

Ludovic Dutoit, Reto Burri, Alexander Nater, Carina F. Mugal & Hans Ellegren
Properly estimating genetic diversity in populations of non-model species requires a basic understanding of how diversity is distributed across the genome and among individuals. To this end we analysed whole-genome re-sequencing data from 20 collared flycatchers (genome size ≈1.1 Gb; 10.13 million single nucleotide polymorphisms detected). Genome-wide nucleotide diversity was almost identical among individuals (mean = 0.00394, range = 0.00384-0.00401) but diversity levels varied extensively across the genome (95% confidence interval for 200 kb windows...

Data from: Climate change upends selection on ornamentation in a wild bird

Simon R. Evans & Lars Gustafsson
Secondary sexual traits have high heritabilities and are exposed to strong, environmentally sensitive selection, and so are expected to evolve rapidly in response to sustained environmental change. We examine the eco-evolutionary dynamics of ornament expression in a long-term study population of collared flycatchers, Ficedula albicollis, in which forehead patch size, which positively influences male reproductive success, declined markedly over 34 years. Annual fitness selection on forehead patch size switched from positive to negative during the...

Data from: Song discrimination by nestling collared flycatchers during early development

S. Eryn McFarlane, Axel Söderberg, David Wheatcroft & Anna Qvarnström
Pre-zygotic isolation is often maintained by species-specific signals and preferences. However, in species where signals are learnt, as in songbirds, learning errors can lead to costly hybridization. Song discrimination expressed during early developmental stages may ensure selective learning later in life but can be difficult to demonstrate before behavioural responses are obvious. Here, we use a novel method, measuring changes in metabolic rate, to detect song perception and discrimination in collared flycatcher embryos and nestlings....

Data from: A demographic ménage à trois: interactions between disturbances both amplify and dampen population dynamics of an endemic plant

Matthew R. Tye, Eric S. Menges, Carl Weekley, Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio, Roberto Salguero-Gómez & Matthew Tye
Natural and anthropogenic disturbances co-occur in most systems, but how they interact to shape demographic outcomes remains poorly understood. Such interactions may alter dynamics of populations in non-additive ways, making demographic predictions challenging when focusing on only one disturbance. Thus, understanding the interactive effects of such disturbances is critically important to determine the population viability of most species under a diversity of stressors. We used a hierarchical integral projection model (IPM), parameterized with 13 years...

Data from: The genetic basis for ecological adaptation of the Atlantic herring revealed by genome sequencing

Alvaro Martinez Barrio, Sangeet Lamichhaney, Guangyi Fan, Nima Rafati, Mats Pettersson, He Zhang, Jacques Dainat, Diana Ekman, Marc Höppner, Patric Jern, Marcel Martin, Björn Nystedt, Xin Liu, Wenbin Chen, Xinming Liang, Chengcheng Shi, Yuanyuan Fu, Kailong Ma, Xiao Zhan, Chungang Feng, Ulla Gustafson, Carl-Johan Rubin, Markus Sällman Almén, Martina Blass, Michele Casini … & Leif Andersson
Ecological adaptation is of major relevance to speciation and sustainable population management, but the underlying genetic factors are typically hard to study in natural populations due to genetic differentiation caused by natural selection being confounded with genetic drift in subdivided populations. Here, we use whole genome population sequencing of Atlantic and Baltic herring to reveal the underlying genetic architecture at an unprecedented detailed resolution for both adaptation to a new niche environment and timing of...

Data from: Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid proteome in Alzheimer's disease

Payam Emami Khoonsari, Anna Häggmark, Maria Lönnberg, Maria Mikus, Lena Kilander, Lars Lannfelt, Jonas Bergquist, Martin Ingelsson, Peter Nilsson, Kim Kultima & Ganna Shevchenko
Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of...

Data from: Antagonistic natural and sexual selection on wing shape in a scrambling damselfly

David Outomuro, Linus Söderquist, Viktor Nilsson-Örtman, María Cortázar-Chinarro, Cecilia Lundgren & Frank Johansson
Wings are a key trait underlying the evolutionary success of birds, bats, and insects. For over a century, researchers have studied the form and function of wings to understand the determinants of flight performance. However, to understand the evolution of flight, we must comprehend not only how morphology affects performance, but also how morphology and performance affect fitness. Natural and sexual selection can either reinforce or oppose each other, but their role in flight evolution...

Data from: Autosomal and X linked additive genetic variation for lifespan and aging: comparisons within and between the sexes in Drosophila melanogaster

Robert M. Griffin, Holger Schielzeth & Urban Friberg
Theory makes several predictions concerning differences in genetic variation between the X chromosome and the autosomes due to male X hemizygosity. The X chromosome should i) typically show relatively less standing genetic variation than the autosomes, ii) exhibit more variation in males compared to females because of dosage compensation, and iii) potentially be enriched with sex-specific genetic variation. Here we address each of these predictions for lifespan and aging in Drosophila melanogaster. To achieve unbiased...

Data from: Selection on learning performance results in the correlated evolution of sexual dimorphism in life history

Martyna Katarzyna Zwoinska, Martin I. Lind, Maria Cortazar-Chinarro, Mark Ramsden & Alexei A. Maklakov
The evolution of learning can be constrained by trade-offs. As male and female life-histories often diverge, the relationship between learning and fitness may differ between the sexes. However, because sexes share much of their genome, intersexual genetic correlations can prevent males and females from reaching their sex-specific optima resulting in intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC). To investigate if IaSC constraints sex-specific evolution of learning we selected Caenorhabditis remanei nematode females for increased or decreased olfactory learning...

Data from: Similarity in G matrix structure among natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata

Adriana Puentes, Gustaf Granath & Jon Ågren
Understanding the stability of the G matrix in natural populations is fundamental for predicting evolutionary trajectories, yet, the extent of its spatial variation and how this impacts responses to selection remain open questions. With a nested paternal half-sib crossing design and plants grown in a field experiment, we examined differences in the genetic architecture of flowering time, floral display and plant size among four Scandinavian populations of Arabidopsis lyrata. Using a multivariate Bayesian framework, we...

Data from: Divergence of gastropod life history in contrasting thermal environments in a geothermal lake

Magnus P. Johansson, Friederike Ermold, Bjarni K. Kristjánsson & Anssi Laurila
Experiments using natural populations have provided mixed support for thermal adaptation models, probably because the conditions are often confounded with additional environmental factors like seasonality. The contrasting geothermal environments within Lake Mývatn, northern Iceland, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate thermal adaptation models using closely located natural populations. We conducted laboratory common garden and field reciprocal transplant experiments to investigate how thermal origin influences the life history of Radix balthica snails originating from stable cold...

Data from: Basidiomycete yeasts in the cortex of ascomycete macrolichens

Toby Spribille, Veera Tuovinen, Philipp Resl, Dan Vanderpool, Heimo Wolinski, M. Catherine Aime, Kevin Schneider, Edith Stabentheiner, Merje Toome-Heller, Göran Thor, Helmut Mayrhofer, Hanna Johannesson & John P. McCutcheon
For over 140 years, lichens have been regarded as a symbiosis between a single fungus, usually an ascomycete, and a photosynthesizing partner. Other fungi have long been known to occur as occasional parasites or endophytes, but the one lichen–one fungus paradigm has seldom been questioned. Here we show that many common lichens are composed of the known ascomycete, the photosynthesizing partner, and, unexpectedly, specific basidiomycete yeasts. These yeasts are embedded in the cortex, and their...

Data from: Adaptive divergence in flowering time among natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana: estimates of selection and QTL mapping

Jon Ågren, Christopher G. Oakley, Sverre Lundemo & Douglas W. Schemske
To identify the ecological and genetic mechanisms of local adaptation requires estimating selection on traits, identifying their genetic basis, and evaluating whether divergence in adaptive traits is due to conditional neutrality or genetic tradeoffs. To this end, we conducted field experiments for three years using recombinant inbred lines derived from two ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana (Italy, Sweden), and at each parental site examined selection on flowering time and mapped QTL. There was strong selection for...

Data from: Evolution of male age-specific reproduction under differential risks and causes of death: males pay the cost of high female fitness

Hwei-Yen Chen, Foteini Spagopoulou, Alexei A. Maklakov & H.-Y. Chen
Classic theories of ageing evolution predict that increased extrinsic mortality due to an environmental hazard selects for increased early reproduction, rapid ageing and short intrinsic lifespan. Conversely, emerging theory maintains that when ageing increases susceptibility to an environmental hazard, increased mortality due to this hazard can select against ageing in physiological condition and prolong intrinsic lifespan. However, evolution of slow ageing under high-condition-dependent mortality is expected to result from reallocation of resources to different traits...

Data from: Disruptive selection without genome-wide evolution across a migratory divide

Jan A. C. Von Rönn, Aaron B. A. Shafer, Jochen B. W. Wolf & Aaron B.A. Shafer
Transcontinental migration is a fascinating example of how animals can respond to climatic oscillation. Yet, quantitative data on fitness components are scarce, and the resulting population genetic consequences are poorly understood. Migratory divides, hybrid zones with a transition in migratory behaviour, provide a natural setting to investigate the micro-evolutionary dynamics induced by migration under sympatric conditions. Here, we studied the effects of migratory programme on survival, trait evolution and genome-wide patterns of population differentiation in...

Data from: Multispecies genetic structure and hybridization in the Betula genus across Eurasia

Yoshiaki Tsuda, Vladimir Semerikov, Federico Sebastiani, Giovanni Giuseppe Vendramin & Martin Lascoux
Boreal and cool temperate forests are the major land cover of northern Eurasia, and information about continental-scale genetic structure and past demographic history of forest species is important from an evolutionary perspective and has conservation implications. However, although many population genetic studies of forest tree species have been conducted in Europe or Eastern Asia, continental-scale genetic structure and past demographic history remain poorly known. Here, we focus on the birch genus Betula, which is commonly...

Data from: The influence of population structure on gene expression and flowering time variation in the ubiquitous weed Capsella bursa-pastoris (Brassicaceae)

Dmytro Kryvokhyzha, Karl Holm, Jun Chen, Amandine Cornille, Sylvain Glémin, Stephen I. Wright, Ulf Lagercrantz & Martin Lascoux
Population structure is a potential problem when testing for adaptive phenotypic differences among populations. The observed phenotypic differences among populations can simply be due to genetic drift, and if the genetic distance between them is not considered, the differentiation may be falsely interpreted as adaptive. Conversely, adaptive and demographic processes might have been tightly associated and correcting for the population structure may lead to false negatives. Here, we evaluated this problem in the cosmopolitan weed...

Data from: Two-current choice flumes for testing avoidance and preference in aquatic animals

Fredrik Jutfelt, Josefin Sundin, Graham D. Raby, Anna-Sara Krång & Timothy D. Clark
Aquatic chemical ecology is an important and growing field of research that involves understanding how organisms perceive and respond to chemical cues in their environment. Research assessing the preference or avoidance of a water source containing specific chemical cues has increased in popularity in recent years, and a variety of methods have been described in the scientific literature. Two-current choice flumes have seen the greatest increase in popularity, perhaps because of their potential to address...

Data from: Rapid evolution of the inter-sexual genetic correlation for fitness in Drosophila melanogaster

Julie M. Collet, Sara Fuentes, Jack Hesketh, Mark S. Hill, Paolo Innocenti, Edward H. Morrow, Kevin Fowler & Max Reuter
Sexual antagonism (SA) arises when male and female phenotypes are under opposing selection, yet genetically correlated. Until resolved, antagonism limits evolution towards optimal sex-specific phenotypes. Despite its importance for sex-specific adaptation and existing theory, the dynamics of SA resolution are not well understood empirically. Here, we present data from Drosophila melanogaster, compatible with a resolution of SA. We compared two independent replicates of the 'LHM' population in which SA had previously been described. Both had...

Data from: Mutations in different pigmentation genes are associated with parallel melanism in island flycatchers

J. Albert C. Uy, Elizabeth A. Cooper, Stephen Cutie, Moira R. Concannon, Jelmer W. Poelstra, Robert G. Moyle & Christopher E. Filardi
The independent evolution of similar traits across multiple taxa provides some of the most compelling evidence of natural selection. Little is known, however, about the genetic basis of these convergent or parallel traits: are they mediated by identical or different mutations in the same genes, or unique mutations in different genes? Using a combination of candidate gene and reduced representation genomic sequencing approaches, we explore the genetic basis of and the evolutionary processes that mediate...

Data from: Brain size evolution in pipefishes and seahorses: the role of feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection

Masahito Tsuboi, Adam Chee Ooi Lim, Boon Leong Ooi, Mei Yee Yip, Ving Ching Chong, Ingrid Ahnesjö & Niclas Kolm
Brain size varies greatly at all taxonomic levels. Feeding ecology, life history and sexual selection have been proposed as key components in generating contemporary diversity in brain size across vertebrates. Analyses of brain size evolution have, however, been limited to lineages where males predominantly compete for mating and females choose mates. Here, we present the first original data set of brain sizes in pipefishes and seahorses (Syngnathidae) a group in which intense female mating competition...

Data from: No evidence for MHC class II-based non-random mating at the gametic haplotype in Atlantic salmon

Marta Promerová, Ghazal Alavioon, Sergio Tusso, Reto Burri & Simone Immler
Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are a likely target of mate choice because of their role in inbreeding avoidance and potential benefits for offspring immunocompetence. Evidence for female choice for complementary MHC alleles among competing males exists both for the pre- and the postmating stages. However, it remains unclear whether the latter may involve non-random fusion of gametes depending on gametic haplotypes resulting in transmission ratio distortion or non-random sequence divergence among fused...

Data from: The snow and the willows: earlier spring snowmelt reduces performance in the low-lying alpine shrub Salix herbacea

Julia A. Wheeler, Andres J. Cortés, Janosch Sedlacek, Sophie Karrenberg, Mark Van Kleunen, Sonja Wipf, Guenter Hoch, Oliver Bossdorf & Christian Rixen
Current changes in shrub abundance in alpine and arctic tundra ecosystems are primarily driven by climate change. However, while taller shrub communities are expanding, dwarf shrub communities show reductions under climate warming, and the mechanisms driving the latter (such as warming temperatures or accelerated spring snowmelt) may be complex. To determine and disentangle the response of a widespread arctic-alpine prostrate dwarf shrub to both climate warming and changes in snowmelt time, we investigated phenology, clonal...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    61

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    61

Affiliations

  • Uppsala University
    61
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • Flinders University
    3
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • Institute of Biosciences and Bioresources
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • University of Paris-Sud
    2