12 Works

Personality-specific carry-over effects on breeding

Steph Harris, Stephanie M Harris, Sebastien Descamps, Lynne Sneddon, Milena Cairo, Philip Bertrand & Samantha Patrick
Carry-over effects describe the phenomenon whereby an animal’s previous conditions influence its subsequent performance. Carry-over effects are unlikely to affect individuals uniformly, but the factors modulating their strength are poorly known. Variation in the strength of carry-over effects may reflect individual differences in pace-of-life: slow-paced, shyly behaved individuals are thought to favour allocation to self-maintenance over current reproduction, compared to their fast-paced, boldly behaved conspecifics (the pace-of-life syndrome hypothesis). Therefore, detectable carry-over effects on breeding...

Notre Golfe - Old Harry

Données obtenues lors du déploiement d'un mouillage équipé de deux pièges à particules près du site Old Harry dans le cadre du projet Notre Golfe. Les particules ont été capturées à 34 et 100 m d'octobre 2014 à octobre 2015 afin de déterminer les variations saisonnières dans l'abondance et la composition du flux de matière particulaire dans le chenal Laurentien de la région du détroit de Cabot dans le Golfe du Saint-Laurent.

Behavioral variation in natural contests: integrating plasticity and personality

Charline Couchoux, Dany Garant, Maxime Aubert, Jeanne Clermont & Denis Réale
Animals often interact aggressively when competing over limited resources. Aggressive decisions can be complex, and may result from multiple sources of behavioral variation. The outcome of contests may be explained through contest theory and personality, by considering conjointly plasticity and individual consistency. This integrative approach also allows investigating individual differences in responsiveness to environmental changes. Here we observed multiple agonistic interactions occurring among eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) competing for food resources supplied at different distances...

Data from: Exploring genomic variation associated with drought stress in Picea mariana populations

Joseph Napier, Guillaume De Lafontaine & Feng Sheng Hu
Predicted increases in drought and heat stress will likely induce shifts in species bioclimatic envelopes. Genetic variants adapted to water limitation may prove pivotal for species response under scenarios of increasing drought. In this study, we aimed to explore this hypothesis by investigating genetic variation in 16 populations of black spruce (Picea mariana) in relation to climate variables in Alaska. A total of 520 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped for 158 trees sampled from...

Data from: Shells of the bivalve Astarte moerchi give new evidence of a strong pelagic-benthic coupling shift occurring since the late 1970s in the NOW Polynya

Frederic Olivier, Blandine Gaillard, Julien Thébault, Tarik Meziane, Réjean Tremblay, Dany Dumont, Simon Bélanger, Michel Gosselin, Aurélie Jolivet, Laurent Chauvaud, André L. Martel, Søren Rysgaard, Anne-Hélène Olivier, Julien Pettré, Jérôme Mars, Silvain Gerber & Philippe Archambault
Climate changes in the Arctic may weaken the currently tight pelagic-benthic coupling. In response to decreasing sea ice cover, arctic marine systems are expected to shift from a ‘sea-ice algae-benthos’ to a ‘phytoplankton-zooplankton’ dominance. We used mollusk shells as bioarchives and fatty acid trophic markers to estimate the effects of the reduction of sea ice cover on the exported food to the seafloor. Bathyal bivalve Astarte moerchi that lives at 600 m depth in northern...

Data from: Contrasted patterns of local adaptation to climate change across the range of an evergreen oak, Quercus aquifolioides

Fang Du, Tianrui Wang, Yuyao Wang, Saneyoshi Ueno & Guillaume De Lafontaine
Long-lived tree species are genetically differentiated and locally adapted with respect to fitness-related traits, but the genetic basis of local adaptation remains largely unresolved. Recent advances in population genetics and landscape genomic analyses enable identification of putative adaptive loci and specific selective pressures acting on local adaptation. Here we sampled 60 evergreen oak (Quercus aquifolioides) populations throughout the species’ range and pool-sequenced 587 individuals at drought stress candidate genes. We analyzed patterns of genetic diversity...

Snow bunting respirometry data

Ryan O'Connor, Audrey Le Pogam, Kevin Young, Francis Robitaille, Emily Choy, Oliver Love, Kyle Elliott, Anna Hargreaves, Dominique Berteaux, Andrew Tam & François Vézina
1. Arctic animals inhabit some of the coldest environments on the planet and have evolved physiological mechanisms for minimizing heat loss under extreme cold. However, the Arctic is warming faster than the global average and how well Arctic animals tolerate even moderately high air temperatures (Ta) is unknown. 2. Using flow-through respirometry we investigated the heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity of snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis; ≈ 31g, N = 42), a cold specialist, Arctic...

Habitat-driven vulnerability to nest predation in Arctic-breeding plovers based on artificial nest experiment and real shorebird nest monitoring – Survival dataset

Don-Jean Léandri-Breton & Joël Bêty
Lower vulnerability to predation should increase the capacity of prey populations to maintain positive population growth rate in regions characterized by high predation pressure. Some arctic nesting shorebirds nest almost exclusively in areas where predation pressure is regularly released. The few species that can breed within the entire distribution range of the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus), the main nest predator in the arctic tundra, are supposedly less sensitive to predation. However, empirical data supporting this...

Ice-age persistence and genetic isolation of the disjunct distribution of larch in Alaska

Joseph Napier, Matias Fernandez, Guillaume De Lafontaine & Feng Sheng Hu
Larix laricina (eastern larch, tamarack) is a transcontinental North American conifer with a prominent disjunction in the Yukon isolating the Alaskan distribution from the rest of its range. We investigate whether in situ persistence during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) or long-distance postglacial migration from south of the ice sheets resulted in the modern-day Alaskan distribution. We analyzed variation in three chloroplast DNA regions of 840 trees from a total of 69 populations (24 new...

Data from: Universal metabolic constraints shape the evolutionary ecology of diving in animals

Wilco Verberk, Piero Calosi, Francois Brischoux, John Spicer, Theodore Garland & David Bilton
Diving as a lifestyle has evolved on multiple occasions when air-breathing terrestrial animals invaded the aquatic realm, and diving performance shapes the ecology and behaviour of all air-breathing aquatic taxa, from small insects to great whales. Using the largest dataset yet assembled, we show that maximum dive duration increases predictably with body mass in both ectotherms and endotherms. Compared to endotherms, ectotherms can remain submerged for longer, but the mass scaling relationship for dive duration...

Integrating functional connectivity in designing networks of protected areas under climate change: a caribou case-study

Martin-Hugues St-Laurent, Sarah Bauduin, Steven G. Cumming & Eliot J.B. McIntire
Land-use change and climate change are recognized as two main drivers of the current biodiversity decline. Protected areas help safeguard the landscape from additional anthropogenic disturbances and, when properly designed, can help species cope with climate change impacts. When designed to protect the regional biodiversity rather than to conserve focal species or landscape elements, protected areas need to cover a representative sample of the regional biodiversity and be functionally connected, facilitating individual movements among protected...

Data from: Divergence of Arctic shrub growth associated with sea ice decline

Agata Buchwal, Patrick F. Sullivan, Marc Macias-Fauria, Eric Post, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Julienne C. Stroeve, Daan Blok, Ken D. Tape, Bruce C. Forbes, Pascale Ropars, Esther Lévesque, Bo Elberling, Sandra Angers-Blondin, Joseph S. Boyle, Stéphane Boudreau, Noémie Boulanger-Lapointe, Cassandra Gamm, Martin Hallinger, Grzegorz Rachlewicz, Amanda Young, Pentti Zetterberg & Jeffrey M. Welker
Arctic sea ice extent (SIE) is declining at an accelerating rate with a wide range of ecological consequences. However, determining sea ice effects on tundra vegetation remains a challenge. In this study, we examined the universality or lack thereof in tundra shrub growth responses to changes in SIE and summer climate across the Pan-Arctic, taking advantage of 23 tundra shrub-ring chronologies from 19 widely distributed sites (56⁰-83⁰N).

Registration Year

  • 2020
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Université du Québec à Rimouski
    12
  • Université Laval
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • University of Manitoba
    2
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    1
  • Plymouth University
    1
  • University of Eastern Finland
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • University of Rennes 1
    1
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    1