74 Works

Data from: Evolutionary dynamics of the cryptocurrency market

Abeer ElBahrawy, Laura Alessandretti, Anne Kandler, Romualdo Pastor-Satorras & Andrea Baronchelli
The cryptocurrency market surpassed the barrier of $100 billion market capitalization in June 2017, after months of steady growth. Despite its increasing relevance in the financial world, a comprehensive analysis of the whole system is still lacking, as most studies have focused exclusively on the behaviour of one (Bitcoin) or few cryptocurrencies. Here, we consider the history of the entire market and analyse the behaviour of 1469 cryptocurrencies introduced between April 2013 and May 2017....

Data from: Spatio-temporal and demographic variation in the diet of New Zealand lesser short-tailed bats (Mystacina tuberculata)

Zenon J. Czenze, J. Leon Tucker, Elizabeth L. Clare, Joanne E. Littlefair, David Hemprich-Bennet, Hernani F.M. Oliveira, R. Mark Brigham, Anthony J.R. Hickey & Stuart Parsons
Variation in the diet of generalist insectivores can be affected by site-specific traits including weather, habitat, and season, as well as demographic traits like reproductive status and age. We used molecular methods to compare diets of three distinct New Zealand populations of lesser short-tailed bats, Mystacina tuberculata. Summer diets were compared between a southern cold-temperate (Eglinton) and a northern population (Puroera). Winter diets were compared between Pureora and a subtropical offshore island population (Hauturu). This...

Data from: C, N, and P fertilization in an Amazonian rainforest support stoichiometric dissimilarity as a driver of litter diversity effects on decomposition

Sandra Barantal, Heidy Schimann, Nathalie Fromin & Stephan Hättenschwiler
Plant leaf litter generally decomposes faster as a group of different species than when individual species decompose alone, but underlying mechanisms of these diversity effects remain poorly understood. Because resource C : N : P stoichiometry (i.e. the ratios of these key elements) exhibits strong control on consumers, we supposed that stoichiometric dissimilarity of litter mixtures (i.e. the divergence in C : N : P ratios among species) improves resource complementarity to decomposers leading to...

Data from: Thermal regime drives a latitudinal gradient in morphology and life history in a livebearing fish

Rüdiger Riesch, Ryan A. Martin, Sarah E. Diamond, Jonas Jourdan, Martin Plath & R. Brian Langerhans
Within-species diversity is often driven by changing selective regimes along environmental gradients. Here, we provide a direct test of the environmental factors underlying phenotypic diversity across the wide native distribution of eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki). We investigated life-history and body-shape divergence (including multiple measures of body size) across more than 14 degrees of latitude in North America, and used Akaike’s information criterion-based model selection to determine the relative contributions of thermal regime, population densities and...

Data from: Synchronous diversification of Sulawesi's iconic artiodactyls driven by recent geological events

Laurent A. F. Frantz, Anna Rudzinski, Abang Mansyursyah Surya Nugraha, Allowen Evin, James Burton, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Anna Linderholm, Ross Barnett, Rodrigo Vega, Evan K. Irving-Pease, James Haile, Richard Allen, Kristin Leus, Jill Shephard, Mia Hillyer, Sarah Gillemot, Jeroen Van Den Hurk, Sharron Ogle, Cristina Atofanei, Mark G. Thomas, Friederike Johansson, Abdul Haris Mustari, John Williams, Kusdiantoro Mohamad, Chandramaya Siska Damayanti … & Greger Larson
The high degree of endemism on Sulawesi has previously been suggested to have vicariant origins, dating back 40 Myr ago. Recent studies, however, suggest that much of Sulawesi’s fauna assembled over the last 15 Myr. Here, we test the hypothesis that more recent uplift of previously submerged portions of land on Sulawesi promoted diversification, and that much of its faunal assemblage is much younger than the island itself. To do so, we combined palaeogeographical reconstructions...

Data from: Bayesian estimation of species divergence times using correlated quantitative characters

Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Anjali Goswami, Ziheng Yang & Mario Dos Reis
Discrete morphological data have been widely used to study species evolution, but the use of quantitative (or continuous) morphological characters is less common. Here, we implement a Bayesian method to estimate species divergence times using quantitative characters. Quantitative character evolution is modelled using Brownian diffusion with character correlation and character variation within populations. Through simulations, we demonstrate that ignoring the population variation (or population “noise”) and the correlation among characters leads to biased estimates of...

Data from: Microglial activation in early Alzheimer trajectory is associated with higher grey matter volume

Grazia Daniela Femminella, Melanie Dani, Melanie Wood, Zhen Fan, Valeria Calsolaro, Rebecca Atkinson, Trudi Edginton, Rainer Hinz, David J. Brooks & Paul Edison
Objective: To investigate the influence of microglial activation in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease trajectory, we assessed the relationship between microglial activation and grey matter volume and hippocampal volume in MCI patients. Methods: In this study, fifty-five participants (37 early stages MCI and 18 controls) underwent [11C]PBR28 PET, a marker of microglial activation; volumetric MRI to evaluate grey matter and hippocampal volumes as well as clinical and neuropsychometric evaluation. [11C]PBR28 VT (volume of distribution)...

Association of SUMOlation pathway genes with stroke in a genome-wide association study in India

Amit Kumar, Ganesh Chauhan, Shriram Sharma, Surekha Dabla, P. N. Sylaja, Neera Chaudhary, Salil Gupta, Chandra Sekhar Agrawal, Kuljeet Singh Anand, Achal Kumar Srivastava, Deepti Vibha, Ram Sagar, Ritesh Raj, Ankita Maheswari, Subbiah Vivekanandhan, Bhavna Kaul, Samudrala Raghavan, Sankar Prasad Gorthi, Dheeraj Mohania, Samander Kaushik, Rohtas Kanwar Yadav, Anjali Hazarika, Pankaj Sharma & Kameshwar Prasad
Objective: To undertake a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic variants for stroke in Indians. Methods: In a hospital-based case-control study, eight teaching hospitals in India recruited 4,088 subjects, including 1,609 stroke cases. Imputed genetic variants were tested for association with stroke subtypes using both single-marker and gene-based tests. Association with vascular risk factors was performed using logistic regression. Various databases were searched for replication, functional annotation, and association with related traits. Status of...

Data from: Year-round sexual harassment as a behavioral mediator of vertebrate population dynamics

Victoria Wearmouth, Emily Southall, David Morritt, Richard C. Thompson, Innes C. Cuthill, Julian Partridge, David W. Sims & Julian C. Partridge
Within-species sexual segregation is a widespread phenomenon among vertebrates but its causes remain a topic of much debate. Female avoidance of male coercive mating attempts has the potential to influence the social structure of animal populations, yet it has been largely overlooked as a driver of sexual separation. Indeed, its potential role in long-term structuring of natural populations has not been studied. Here we use a comparative approach to examine the suitability of multiple hypotheses...

Data from: Multiple cases of asymmetric introgression among horseshoe bats detected by phylogenetic conflicts across loci

Xiuguang Mao, Vu D. Thong, Paul J. J. Bates, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen J. Rossiter
Phylogenetic discordance among taxa can provide powerful insights into past episodes of introgressive hybridization, as well as lineage sorting. Previously, we showed that the taxonomically distinct taxon Rhinolophus sinicus septentrionalis has undergone historical introgression with its sympatric sister subspecies Rhinolophus sinicus sinicus. To examine in more detail the extent of gene flow between these two taxa, and also between these and their sister species Rhinolophus thomasi, we obtained new samples from China, Myanmar, and Vietnam,...

Data from: Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding

Eric Lowet, Mark Roberts, Avgis Hadjipapas, Alina Peter, Jan Van Der Eerden & Peter De Weerd
Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (~25–80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping (‘binding’) and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated...

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Anatomy, ontogeny, and evolution of the archosaurian respiratory system: a case study on Alligator mississippiensis and Struthio camelus

Emma Schachner, Brandon Hedrick, Heather Richbourg, John Hutchinson & CG Farmer
The avian lung is highly specialized and is both functionally and morphologically distinct from that of their closest extant relatives, the crocodilians. It is highly partitioned, with a unidirectionally ventilated and immobilized gas-exchanging lung, and fully decoupled, compliant, poorly vascularized ventilatory air-sacs. To understand the evolutionary history of the archosaurian (birds, crocodilians and their common ancestors) respiratory system, it is essential to determine which anatomical characteristics are shared between birds and crocodilians and the role...

Data from: A phylogenomic analysis of the role and timing of molecular adaptation in the aquatic transition of cetartiodactyl mammals

Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Michael R. McGowen, Kalina T. J. Davies, Simon Jarman, Andrea Polanowski, Mads F. Bertelsen & Stephen J. Rossiter
Recent studies have reported multiple cases of molecular adaptation in cetaceans related to their aquatic abilities. However, none of these has included the hippopotamus, precluding an understanding of whether molecular adaptations in cetaceans occurred before or after they split from their semi-aquatic sister taxa. Here, we obtained new transcriptomes from the hippopotamus and humpback whale, and analysed these together with available data from eight other cetaceans. We identified more than 11 000 orthologous genes and...

Data from: Speciation processes in putative island endemic sister bat species: false impressions from mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data

Hao-Chih Kuo, Shiang-Fan Chen, Yin-Ping Fang, James A. Cotton, Joe D. Parker, Gábor Csorba, Burton K. Lim, Judith L. Eger, Chia-Hong Chen, Cheng-Han Chou & Stephen J. Rossiter
Cases of geographically restricted co-occurring sister taxa are rare and may point to potential divergence with gene flow. The two bat species Murina gracilis and M. recondita are both endemic to Taiwan and are putative sister species. To test for non-allopatric divergence and gene flow in these taxa, we generated sequences using Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing, and combined these with microsatellite data for coalescent-based analyses. MtDNA phylogenies supported the reciprocally monophyletic sister relationship between...

Data from: Microform-scale variations in peatland permeability and their ecohydrological implications

Andy J. Baird, Alice M. Milner, Antony Blundell, Graeme T. Swindles & Paul J. Morris
1. The acrotelm-catotelm model of peatland hydrological and biogeochemical processes posits that the permeability of raised bogs is largely homogenous laterally but varies strongly with depth through the soil profile; uppermost peat layers are highly permeable while deeper layers are, effectively, impermeable. 2. We measured down-core changes in peat permeability, plant macrofossil assemblages, dry bulk density and degree of humification beneath two types of characteristic peatland microform – ridges and hollows – at a raised...

Data from: The effect of sexual selection on adaptation and extinction under increasing temperatures

Jonathan M. Parrett & Robert J. Knell
Strong sexual selection has been reported to both enhance and hinder the adaptive capacity and persistence of populations when exposed to novel environments. Consequently, how sexual selection influences population adaption and persistence under stress remains widely debated. Here we present two empirical investigations of the fitness consequences of sexual selection on populations of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, exposed to stable or gradually increasing temperatures. When faced with increasing temperatures strong sexual selection was...

Data from: Ageing and agency: age-related changes in susceptibility to illusory experiences of control

Maria Cristina Cioffi, Gianna Cocchini, Michael J. Banissy & James W. Moore
Sense of agency (SoAg) is the feeling of control over one's actions and their effects. It can be augmented or attenuated by internal signals and by external cues. Research has shown a reduction in the SoAg in older adulthood, but the reasons behind this change remain unclear. We investigated agency processing differences that may underpin age-related changes in SoAg. Using a modified version of a vicarious agency paradigm, we tested the modulation of SoAg by...

Data from: Elevational changes in the avian community of a Mesoamerican cloud forest park

Montague H. C. Neate-Clegg, Samuel E. I. Jones, Oliver Burdekin, Merlijn Jocque & Çağan Hakkı Şekercioğlu.
Harboring many range-restricted and specialized species, high elevation tropical cloud forests are diverse habitats represented in many protected areas. Despite this, many such areas receive little practical protection from deforestation and land conversion. Moreover, montane species may be more sensitive to climate change owing to various factors affecting community assembly across elevational gradients. Few studies have used annual monitoring to assess how biological communities in cloud forests may be shifting in response to habitat or...

Data from: A game-theoretical model of kleptoparasitic behaviour in an urban gull (Laridae) population.

Robert Spencer & Mark Broom
Kleptoparasitism (food stealing) is a significant behaviour for animals that forage in social groups as it permits some individuals to obtain resources whilst avoiding the costs of searching for their own food. Evolutionary game theory has been used to model kleptoparasitism, with a series of differential equation based compartmental models providing significant theoretical insights into behaviour in kleptoparasitic populations. In this paper we apply this compartmental modelling approach to kleptoparasitic behaviour in a real foraging...

Data from: Copy-when-uncertain: bumblebees rely on social information when rewards are highly variable

Marco Smolla, Sylvain Alem, Lars Chittka & Susanne Shultz
To understand the relative benefits of social and personal information use in foraging decisions, we developed an agent-based model of social learning that predicts social information should be more adaptive where resources are highly variable and personal information where resources vary little. We tested our predictions with bumblebees and found that foragers relied more on social information when resources were variable than when they were not. We then investigated whether socially salient cues are used...

Data from: Interactions between plant genome size, nutrients and herbivory by rabbits, molluscs and insects on a temperate grassland

Maïté S. Guignard, Michael J. Crawley, Dasha Kovalenko, Richard A. Nichols, Mark Trimmer, Andrew R. Leitch & Ilia J. Leitch
Angiosperm genome sizes (GS) vary c. 2,400-fold. Recent research has shown that GS influences plant abundance, and plant competition. There are also tantalising reports that herbivores may select plants as food dependent on their GS. To test the hypothesis that GS plays a role in shaping plant communities under herbivore pressure, we exploit a grassland experiment that has experimentally excluded herbivores and applied nutrient over 8 years. Using phylogenetically-informed statistical models and path analyses, we...

Data from: Multiscale patterns of rarity in fungi, inferred from fruiting records

Alan C. Gange, Lewis P. Allen, Aline Nussbaumer, Edward G. Gange, Carrie Andrew, Simon Egli, Beatrice Senn-Irlet & Lynne Boddy
Aim: It is unknown whether fungi show similar trends to other organisms in their macroecological patterns of abundance and spatial distribution. Here, we investigated fungal abundance-occupancy relationships to determine whether fungi that are common at a local scale tend to be more widely distributed. Location: UK and Switzerland Time period: 1950 - 2014 Major taxa studied: Fungi Methods: We used a local dataset of fruiting records of 2,319 species in the UK, accumulated over 65...

Data from: Elevated virulence of an emerging viral genotype as a driver of honeybee loss

Dino P. McMahon, Myrsini E. Natsopoulou, Vincent Doublet, Matthias Fürst, Silvio Weging, Mark J. F. Brown, Andreas Gogol-Döring & Robert J. Paxton
Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) have contributed significantly to the current biodiversity crisis, leading to widespread epidemics and population loss. Owing to genetic variation in pathogen virulence, a complete understanding of species decline requires the accurate identification and characterization of EIDs. We explore this issue in the Western honeybee, where increasing mortality of populations in the Northern Hemisphere has caused major concern. Specifically, we investigate the importance of genetic identity of the main suspect in mortality,...

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