149 Works

2010 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

2015 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

2016 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

Data and code for: Identifying fine-scale habitat preferences of threatened butterflies using airborne laser scanning

Jan Peter Reinier De Vries, Zsófia Koma, Michiel F. WallisDeVries & W. Daniel Kissling
Aim: Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) is a promising remote sensing technique for ecological applications because it can quantify vegetation structure at high resolution over broad spatial extents. Using country-wide airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, we test to what extent fine-scale LiDAR metrics capturing low vegetation, medium-to-high vegetation and landscape-scale habitat structures can explain the habitat preferences of threatened butterflies at a national extent. Location: The Netherlands. Methods: We applied a machine learning (random forest)...

Idiap Poster Data

Hayley Hung & Ben Kröse
The Idiap Poster Data consists of images extracted from 6 hours of videos shot during a poster session.

Energetic constraints imposed on trophic interaction strengths enhance resilience in empirical and model food webs

Xiaoxiao Li, Wei Yang, Ursula Gaedke & Peter De Ruiter
1. Food web stability and resilience are at the heart of understanding the structure and functioning of ecosystems. Previous studies show that models of empirical food webs are substantially more stable than random ones, due to a few strong interactions embedded in a majority of weak interactions. Analyses of trophic interaction loops show that in empirical food webs the patterns in the interaction strengths prevent the occurrence of destabilizing heavy loops and thereby enhances resilience....

Data from: Effects of immune challenge on the oviposition strategy of a noctuid moth

Heike Staudacher, Steph B. J. Menken & Astrid T. Groot
Infections can have detrimental effects on the fitness of an animal. Reproducing females may therefore be sensitive to cues of infection and be able to adaptively change their oviposition strategy in the face of infection. As one possibility, females could make a terminal investment and shift reproductive effort from future to current reproduction as life expectancy decreases. We hypothesized that females of the noctuid moth Heliothis virescens make a terminal investment and adapt their oviposition...

Data from: Short distance migrants travel as far as long distance migrants in lesser black-backed gulls Larus fuscus

Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Joseph B. Burant, E. Emiel Van Loon, Willem Bouten & C. J. Camphuysen
Migration strategies differ greatly among and within avian populations. The associated trade-offs and fitness consequences of diverse strategies and how they persist are pertinent questions in migration research. Migration is a costly endeavour, presumably compensated for by better survival conditions in the non-breeding area. One way to assess the cost of alternative strategies is to investigate the investment in movement across the entire annual cycle, an assessment made increasingly feasible with improvements in tracking technology....

Data from: Balancing food and density-dependence in the spatial distribution of an interference-prone forager

Adriaan Dokter, E. Emiel Van Loon, Cornelis Rappoldt, Kees Oosterbeek, Martin J. Baptist, Willem Bouten, Bruno J. Ens & Adriaan M. Dokter
Foraging distributions are thought to be density-dependent, because animals not only select for a high availability and quality of resources, but also avoid conspecific interference. Since these processes are confounded, their relative importance in shaping foraging distributions remains poorly understood. Here we aimed to rank the contribution of density-dependent and density-independent effects on the spatio-temporal foraging patterns of eurasian oystercatchers. In our intertidal study area, tides caused continuous variation in oystercatcher density, providing an opportunity...

Data from: Orientation of native versus translocated juvenile Lesser Spotted Eagles (Clanga pomarina) on the first autumn migration

Bernd Ulrich Meyburg, Ugis Bergmanis, Thorsten Langgemach, Kai Graszynski, Arno Hinz, Ingo Borner, Christiane Meyburg & Wouter M.G. Vansteelant
The ontogeny of migration routines used by wild birds remains unresolved. Here we investigated the migratory orientation of juvenile lesser spotted eagles (LSE) (Clanga pomarina) based on translocation and satellite tracking. Between 2004 and 2016, 85 second-hatched juveniles (Abels) were reared in captivity for release into the declining German population, including 50 birds that were translocated 940 km from Latvia. In 2009, we tracked 12 translocated juveniles, as well as 8 native juveniles and 9...

Data from: Logical validation and evaluation of practical feasibility for the SCRuM (School Clinical Rugby Measure) test battery developed for young adolescent rugby players in a resource-constrained environment

Matthew Chiwaridzo, Danai Chandahwa, Sander Oorschot, Cathrine Tadyanemhandu, Jermaine M. Dambi, Gillian Ferguson, Bouwien C.M. Smits-Engelsman & Bouwien C. M. Smits-Engelsman
There is a growing impetus towards usage of test batteries in talent identification (TID) programmes in rugby. Consequently, there are many test batteries in existence profiling anthropometric, physiological characteristics and rugby-specific skills. There is no consensus in the literature on the constituent variables and corresponding tests required to inform TID programs. Following development of a new test battery called the SCRuM (School Clinical Rugby Measure), this study aimed at establishing face, logical validity and practical...

Data from: Adaptation of a polyphagous herbivore to a novel host plant extensively shapes the transcriptome of herbivore and host

Nicky Wybouw, Vladimir Zhurov, Catherine Martel, Kristie A. Bruinsma, Frederik Hendrickx, Vojislava Grbić & Thomas Van Leeuwen
Generalist arthropod herbivores rapidly adapt to a broad range of host plants. However, the extent of transcriptional reprogramming in the herbivore and its hosts associated with adaptation remains poorly understood. Using the spider mite Tetranychus urticae and tomato as models with available genomic resources, we investigated the reciprocal genomewide transcriptional changes in both spider mite and tomato as a consequence of mite's adaptation to tomato. We transferred a genetically diverse mite population from bean to...

Data from: How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems

Els M. Van Der Zee, Christine Angelini, Laura L. Govers, Marjolijn J. A. Christianen, Andrew H. Altieri, Karin J. Van Der Reijden, Brian R. Silliman, Johan Van De Koppel, Matthijs Van Der Geest, Jan A. Van Gils, Henk W. Van Der Veer, Theunis Piersma, Peter C. De Ruiter, Han Olff & Tjisse Van Der Heide
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and...

Data from: Life-history evolution in response to changes in metapopulation structure in an arthropod herbivore

Annelies De Roissart, Nicky Wybouw, David Renault, Thomas Van Leeuwen & Dries Bonte
The persistence and dynamics of populations largely depends on the way they are configured and integrated into space and the ensuing eco-evolutionary dynamics. We manipulated spatial and temporal variation in patch size in replicated experimental metapopulations of the herbivore mite Tetranychus urticae and followed evolutionary dynamics over approximately 30 generations. A significant divergence in life history traits, physiological endpoints and gene expression was recorded in the spatially and spatiotemporally variable metapopulation, but also a remarkable...

Data from: Inter-annual variability and long-term trends in breeding success in a declining population of migratory swans

Kevin A. Wood, Julia L. Newth, Geoff M. Hilton, Bart A. Nolet & Eileen C. Rees
Population declines among migratory Arctic-breeding birds are a growing concern for conservationists. To inform the conservation of these declining populations, we need to understand how demographic rates such as breeding success are influenced by combinations of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In this study we examined inter-annual variation and long-term trends in two aspects of the breeding success of a migratory herbivore, the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii, which is currently undergoing a population decline: 1)...

Data from: Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, T. Mitchell Aide, Angélica M. Almeyda Zambrano, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Eben N. Broadbent, Robin L. Chazdon, Dylan Craven, Jarcilene S. De Almeida-Cortez, George A. L. Cabral, Ben H. J. De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan M. Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mario M. Espírito-Santo, María C. Fandino, Ricardo G. César, Jefferson S. Hall, José Luis Hernandez-Stefanoni, Catarina C. Jakovac … & Danaë M. A. Rozendaal
Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2, 3, 4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major...

Data from: Oviposition preference of cabbage white butterflies in the framework of costs and benefits of interspecific herbivore associations

Kaori Shiojiri, Maurice Sabelis & Junji Takabayashi
When deciding where to oviposit, herbivorous insects consider: (i) the plant’s value as a food source, (ii) the risks of competing with con- and heterospecific herbivores, and (iii) the risks of parasitism and predation on the host plant. The presence of con- and/or heterospecific competitors would further affect the oviposition preference, because the preceding herbivores induce direct/indirect defences in plants against forthcoming herbivores, and thereby alter oviposition decisions. In previous studies, the abovementioned factors have...

Data from: How individual Montagu's Harriers cope with Moreau's Paradox during the Sahelian winter

Almut Ellinor Schlaich, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Ben Johannes Koks, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Hundreds of millions of Afro-Palaearctic migrants winter in the Sahel, a semi-arid belt south of the Sahara desert, where they experience deteriorating ecological conditions during their overwintering stay and have to prepare for spring migration when conditions are worst. This well-known phenomenon was first described by R.E. Moreau and is known ever since as Moreau's Paradox. However, empirical evidence of the deteriorating seasonal ecological conditions is limited and little is known on how birds respond....

Data from: Flap or soar? How a flight generalist responds to its aerial environment

E. Emiel Van Loon, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Willem Bouten, Christiaan Meijer & C. J. Camphuysen
The aerial environment is heterogeneous in space and time and directly influences the costs of animal flight. Volant animals can reduce these costs by using different flight modes, each with their own benefits and constraints. However, the extent to which animals alter their flight modes in response to environmental conditions has rarely been studied in the wild. To provide insight into how a flight generalist can reduce the energetic cost of movement, we studied flight...

Data from: Biogeographic, climatic and spatial drivers differentially affect α-, β- and γ-diversities on oceanic archipelagos

Juliano Sarmento Cabral, Patrick Weigelt, Walter Daniel Kissling & Holger Kreft
Island biogeographic studies traditionally treat single islands as units of analysis. This ignores the fact that most islands are spatially nested within archipelagos. Here, we took a fundamentally different approach and focused on entire archipelagos using species richness of vascular plants on 23 archipelagos worldwide and their 174 constituent islands. We assessed differential effects of biogeographic factors (area, isolation, age, elevation), current and past climate (temperature, precipitation, seasonality, climate change velocity) and intra-archipelagic spatial structure...

Data from: Inbreeding depression and purging in a haplodiploid: gender-related effects

Nicola S. H. Tien, Maurice W. Sabelis & Martijn Egas
Compared with diploid species, haplodiploids suffer less inbreeding depression because male haploidy imposes purifying selection on recessive deleterious alleles. However, alleles of genes only expressed in the diploid females are protected in heterozygous individuals. This leads to the prediction that haplodiploids suffer more from inbreeding effects on life-history traits controlled by genes with female-limited expression. To test this, we used a wild population of the haplodiploid mite Tetranychus urticae. First, negative effects of inbreeding were...

Data from: On the perplexingly low rate of transport of IgG2 across the human placenta

Helga K. Einarsdottir, Nigel M. Stapleton, Sicco Scherjon, Jan Terje Andersen, Theo Rispens, C. Ellen Van Der Schoot & Gestur Vidarsson
The neonatal receptor, FcRn, mediates both serum half–life extension as well as active transport of maternal IgG to the fetus during pregnancy. Therefore, transport efficiency and half-life go hand-in-hand. However, while the half-life of the human IgG2 subclass is comparable to IgG1, the placental transport of IgG2 is not, with the neonatal IgG1 levels generally exceeding maternal levels at birth, but not for IgG2. We hypothesized that the unique short-hinged structure of IgG2, which enables...

Data from: Cell turnover and detritus production in marine sponges from tropical and temperate benthic ecosystems

Brittany E. Alexander, Kevin Liebrand, Ronald Osinga, Harm G. Van Der Geest, Wim Admiraal, Jack P. M. Cleutjens, Bert Schutte, Fons Verheyen, Marta Ribes, Emiel Van Loon & Jasper M. De Goeij
This study describes in vivo cell turnover (the balance between cell proliferation and cell loss) in eight marine sponge species from tropical coral reef, mangrove and temperate Mediterranean reef ecosystems. Cell proliferation was determined through the incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and measuring the percentage of BrdU-positive cells after 6 h of continuous labeling (10 h for Chondrosia reniformis). Apoptosis was identified using an antibody against active caspase-3. Cell loss through shedding was studied quantitatively by...

Data from: High levels of effective long-distance dispersal may blur ecotypic divergence in a rare terrestrial orchid

An Vanden Broeck, Wouter Van Landuyt, Karen Cox, Luc De Bruyn, Ralf Gyselings, Gerard Oostermeijer, Bertille Valentin, Gregor Božič, Branko Dolinar, Zoltán Illyés & Joachim Mergeay
Background: Gene flow and adaptive divergence are key aspects of metapopulation dynamics and ecological speciation. Long-distance dispersal is hard to detect and few studies estimate dispersal in combination with adaptive divergence. The aim of this study was to investigate effective long-distance dispersal and adaptive divergence in the fen orchid (Liparis loeselii (L.) Rich.). We used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based assignment tests to quantify effective long-distance dispersal at two different regions in Northwest Europe. In...

Data from: Beyond predation: the zoophytophagous predator Macrolophus pygmaeus induces tomato resistance against spider mites

Maria L. Pappas, Anke Steppuhn, Daniel Geuss, Nikoleta Topalidou, Aliki Zografou, Maurice W. Sabelis & George D. Broufas
Many predatory insects that prey on herbivores also feed on the plant, but it is unknown whether plants affect the performance of herbivores by responding to this phytophagy with defence induction. We investigate whether the prior presence of the omnivorous predator Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur) on tomato plants affects plant resistance against two different herbivore species. Besides plant-mediated effects of M. pygmaeus on herbivore performance, we examined whether a plant defence trait that is known to...

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