155 Works

Data from: Active prey mixing as an explanation for polyphagy in predatory arthropods: synergistic dietary effects on egg production despite a behavioural cost

Renata Vieira Marques, Renato Almeida Sarmento, Felipe Lemos, Marçal Pedro-Neto, Maurice W. Sabelis, Madelaine Venzon, Angelo Pallini & Arne Janssen
1.Mixing of prey that differ in nutrient content or toxic compounds (dietary mixing) may allow synovigenic predatory arthropods to balance their diet or dilute toxins of different prey items to maximize performance: dietary mixing may therefore explain the prevalence of polyphagy in this functional group. 2.Several predatory arthropods can redress nutritional imbalances in their diet by actively mixing different diets, based on experiments with artificial diets or with prey that were manipulated to contain different...

Data from: Latitudinal and altitudinal patterns of plant community diversity on mountain summits across the tropical Andes

Francisco Cuesta, Priscilla Muriel, Luis D. Llambí, Stephan Halloy, Nikolay Aguirre, Stephan Beck, Julieta Carilla, Rosa I. Meneses, Soledad Cuello, Alfredo Grau, Luis E. Gámez, Javier Irazábal, Jorge Jacome, Ricardo Jaramillo, Lirey Ramírez, Natalia Samaniego, David Suárez-Duque, Natali Thompson, Alfredo Tupayachi, Paul Viñas, Karina Yager, María T. Becerra, Harald Pauli & William D. Gosling
The high tropical Andes host one of the richest alpine floras of the world, with exceptionally high levels of endemism and turnover rates. Yet, little is known about the patterns and processes that structure altitudinal and latitudinal variation in plant community diversity. Herein we present the first continental-scale comparative study of plant community diversity on summits of the tropical Andes. Data were obtained from 792 permanent vegetation plots (1m2) within 50 summits, distributed along a...

Data from: Population genetics of Wolbachia-infected, parthenogenetic and uninfected, sexual populations of Tetrastichus coeruleus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

Barbara M. Reumer, Jacques J. M. Van Alphen & Ken Kraaijeveld
Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria known to manipulate the reproduction of their hosts. These manipulations are expected to have consequences on the population genetics of the host, such as heterozygosity levels, genetic diversity and gene flow. The parasitoid wasp Tetrastichus coeruleus has populations that are infected with parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia and populations that are not infected. We studied the population genetics of T. coeruleus between and within Wolbachia-infected and uninfected populations, using nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA....

Data from: Field validation of radar systems for monitoring bird migration

Cecilia Nilsson, Adriaan M. Dokter, Baptiste Schmid, Martina Scacco, Liesbeth Verlinden, Johan Bäckman, Günther Haase, Giacomo Dell'Omo, Jason W. Chapman, Hidde Leijnse & Felix Liechti
1. Advances in information technology are increasing the use of radar as a tool to investigate and monitor bird migration movements. We set up a field campaign to compare and validate outputs from different radar systems. 2. Here we compare the pattern of nocturnal bird migration movements recorded by four different radar systems at a site in southern Sweden. Within the range of the weather radar (WR) Ängelholm, we operated a “BirdScan” (BS) dedicated bird...

Data from: Soaring across continents: decision-making of a soaring migrant under changing atmospheric conditions along an entire flyway

Wouter Vansteelant, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, James D. McLaren, Jan Van Diermen, Willem Bouten, Wouter M. G. Vansteelant & James McLaren
(1) Thermal soaring birds reduce flight-energy costs by alternatingly gaining altitude in thermals and gliding across the earth’s surface. To find out how soaring migrants adjust their flight behaviour to dynamic atmospheric conditions across entire migration routes, we combined optimal soaring migration theory with high-resolution GPS tracking data of migrating Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus and wind data from a global numerical atmospheric model. (2) We compared measurements of gliding air speeds to predictions based on...

Data from: Aeroecology meets aviation safety: early warning systems in Europe and the Middle East prevent collisions between birds and aircraft

Hans Van Gasteren, Karen L. Krijgsveld, Nadine Klauke, Yossi Leshem, Isabel C. Metz, Michal Skakuj, Serge Sorbi, Inbal Schekler & Judy Shamoun-Baranes
The aerosphere is utilized by billions of birds, moving for different reasons and from short to great distances spanning tens of thousands of kilometres. The aerosphere, however, is also utilized by aviation which leads to increasing conflicts in and around airfields as well as en-route. Collisions between birds and aircraft cost billions of euros annually and, in some cases, result in the loss of human lives. Simultaneously, aviation has diverse negative impacts on wildlife. During...

Data and code for: Past and future extinctions shape the body size - fruit size relationship between palms and mammalian frugivores

Jun Ying Lim, Jens-Christian Svenning, Bastian Göldel, Søren Faurby & W. Daniel Kissling
The dispersal of seeds by mammalian frugivores influences the structure and composition of plant communities, but most ecosystems have undergone defaunation over thousands of years, a process that continues today. Understanding how past defaunation has affected fruit-frugivore interactions will thus provide insights into how ecosystems may respond to future frugivore loss. By integrating palm and mammalian frugivore trait and occurrence data worldwide, we reveal a global positive relationship between fruit size and body size of...

Beyond the group: how food, mates and group size influence inter-group encounters in wild bonobos

Stefano Lucchesi, Leveda Cheng, Karline Janmaat, Roger Mundry, Anne Pisor & Surbeck Martin
In social-living animals, interactions between groups are frequently agonistic, but they can also be tolerant and even cooperative. Inter-group tolerance and cooperation are regarded as a crucial step in the formation of highly-structured multilevel societies. Behavioral ecological theory suggests that inter-group tolerance and cooperation can emerge either when the costs of hostility outweigh the benefits of exclusive resource access, or when both groups gain fitness benefits through their interactions. However, the factors promoting inter-group tolerance...

Prediction of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with a new clinical score and D-dimer levels

Mirjam R Heldner, Susanna M Zuurbier, Bojun Li, Rascha Von Martial, Joost CM Meijers, Rebekka Zimmermann, Bastian Volbers, Simon Jung, Marwan El-Koussy, Urs Fischer, Hans Peter Kohler, Verena Schroeder, Jonathan M Coutinho & Marcel Arnold
OBJECTIVE:To investigate prediction of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) by clinical variables and D-dimer levels. METHODS:This prospective multicentre study included consecutive patients with clinically possible CVT. On admission, patients underwent clinical examination, blood-sampling for D-dimers-measuring (ELISA-test), and MR-/CT-venography. Predictive value of clinical variables and D-dimers for CVT were calculated. A clinical score to stratify patients into groups with low, moderate, or high CVT risk was established using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS:CVT was confirmed in 25.8% (94/359)...

Subcellular view of host–microbiome nutrient exchange in sponges: insights into the ecological success of an early metazoan–microbe symbiosis

Meggie Hudspith, Laura Rix, Michelle Achlatis, Jeremy Bougoure, Paul Guagliardo, Peta L. Clode, Nicole S. Webster, Gerard Muyzer, Mathieu Pernice & Jasper M. De Goeij
Background: Sponges are increasingly recognised as key ecosystem engineers in many aquatic habitats. They play an important role in nutrient cycling due to their unrivalled capacity for processing both dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) and the exceptional metabolic repertoire of their diverse and abundant microbial communities. Functional studies determining the role of host and microbiome in organic nutrient uptake and exchange, however, are limited. Therefore, we coupled pulse-chase isotopic tracer techniques with...

Data from: Why time-limited individuals can make populations more vulnerable to disturbance

Henk-Jan Van Der Kolk, Bruno Ens, Magali Frauendorf, Eelke Jongejans, Kees Oosterbeek, Willem Bouten & Martijn Van De Pol
Individual variation in disturbance vulnerability (i.e. the likelihood that disturbance negatively affects an individual’s fitness) can affect how disturbance impacts animal populations, as even at low disturbance levels some individuals could be severely affected and die. Individual variation in vulnerability can arise due to different responses to disturbance. We propose a new hypothesis that even when individuals respond similarly to disturbance, time-limited individuals are more at risk that their condition deteriorates since they have limited...

Physical and biological constraints on the capacity for life-history expression of anadromous salmonids: an Eel River, California, case study

Alyssa FitzGerald, David Boughton, Joshua Fuller, Sara John, Benjamin Martin, Lee Harrison & Nathan Mantua
Recovery of anadromous salmonid populations is complicated by the fact that these fish have complex life-histories. Habitat valuation and capacity methods need to account for spatiotemporal variability in temperature, geomorphic features, and a species’ thermal sensitivity mediated by biological interactions. We examined this interplay in a case study of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Chinook Salmon (O. tshawytscha) in California’s Eel River watershed. We estimated habitat suitability and fish capacity for each salmonid run and...

Data from: Human occupation and ecosystem change on Upolu (Samoa) during the Holocene

William Gosling, David Sear, Jonathan Hassall, Pete Langdon, Mick Bönnen, Tessa Driessen, Zoë Van Kemenada, Kevin Noort, Melanie Leng, Ian Croudace, Anna Bourne & Crystal McMichael
Aim To track the peopling of the South Pacific and assess their impact on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Location Upolu, Samoa. Taxon Ancient charcoal, pollen, sprores, algae and cyanobacteria types are recorded. Methods A sedimentary record covering the last c. 10,500 years was recovered from the volcanic crater that contains Lake Lanoto'o near the centre of Upolu Island. Information on past ecological change was obtained from microscopic and macroscopic remains extracted from the sediments: charcoal...

Shorebird feeding specialists differ in how environmental conditions alter their foraging time

Henk-Jan Van Der Kolk, Bruno J. Ens, Kees Oosterbeek, Willem Bouten, Andrew M. Allen, Magali Frauendorf, Thomas K. Lameris, Thijs Oosterbeek, Symen Deuzeman, Kelly De Vries, Eelke Jongejans & Martijn Van De Pol
Feeding specialisation is a common cause of individual variation. Fitness payoffs of specialisation vary with environmental conditions, but the underlying behavioural mechanisms are poorly understood. Such mechanistic knowledge, however, is crucial to reliably predict responses of heterogeneous populations to environmental change. We quantified spatiotemporal allocation of foraging behaviour in wintering Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus), a species in which feeding specialisation can be inferred from bill shape. We combined GPS and accelerometer data to quantify foraging...

Plant dispersal strategies of high tropical alpine communities across the Andes

Carolina Tovar, Inga Melcher, Buntarou Kusumoto, Francisco Cuesta, Antoine Cleef, Rosa Isela Meneses, Stephan Halloy, Luis Daniel Llambi, Stephan Beck, Priscilla Muriel, Ricardo Jaramillo, Jorge Jacome & Julieta Carilla
• Dispersal is a key ecological process that influences plant community assembly. Therefore, understanding whether dispersal strategies are associated with climate is of utmost importance, particularly in areas greatly exposed to climate change. We examined alpine plant communities located in the mountain summits of the tropical Andes across a 4000 km latitudinal gradient. We investigated species dispersal strategies and tested their association with climatic conditions and their evolutionary history. • We used dispersal-related traits (dispersal...

Data from: Long-term ecological legacies in western Amazonia

Christine Åkesson, Crystal McMichael, Marco Raczka, Seringe Huisman, Johnny Vogel, Mona Palmeira, David Neill, Jason Veizaj & Mark Bush
1. Modifications of Amazonian forests by pre-Columbian peoples are thought to have left ecological legacies that have persisted to the modern day. Most Amazonian palaeoecological records do not, however, provide the required temporal resolution to document the nuanced changes of pre-Columbian disturbance or post-disturbance succession and recovery, making it difficult to detect any direct, or indirect, ecological legacies on tree species. 2. Here, we investigate the fossil pollen, phytolith, and charcoal history of Lake Kumpaka,...

The brains of elite soccer players are subject to experience-dependent alterations in white matter connectivity

Zai-Fu Yao
Soccer is the only major sport with voluntary unprotected head-to-ball contact. It is crucial to determine if head impact through regular soccer sports training is manifested in brain structure and connectivity, and whether such alterations are due to sustained training per se. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we documented a comprehensive view of soccer players’ brains in a sample of twenty-five right-handed male elite soccer players aged from 18 to 22 years and twenty-five non-athletic controls...

The role of deterministic succession during forest succession within a South African savanna

Samantha-Leigh Jamison-Daniels, Daniel Kissling, Monique Botha, Mathew Harris, Christopher Gordon & Michelle Greve
Bush encroachment can lead to a switch from open savannas to dense woodlands or forests. This has implications for both the composition of ecological communities and the provision of ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling and grazing capacity. The patterns and underlying drivers responsible for bush encroachment are not fully understood. Here, we investigate the underlying determinants of bush clump formation (a form of encroachment) in a South African savanna and explore whether bush clump...

Data from: Nocturnal foraging lifts time-constraints in winter for migratory geese but hardly speeds up fueling

Thomas Lameris, Adriaan Dokter, Henk Van Der Jeugd, Willem Bouten, Jasper Koster, Stefan Sand, Coen Westerduin & Bart Nolet
Climate warming advances the optimal timing of breeding for many animals. For migrants to start breeding earlier, a concurrent advancement of migration is required, including pre-migratory fueling of energy reserves. We investigate whether barnacle geese are time-constrained during pre-migratory fueling and whether there is potential to advance or shorten the fueling period to allow an earlier migratory departure. We equipped barnacle geese with GPS-trackers and accelerometers to remotely record birds’ behavior, from which we calculated...

Data for: Sex pheromone signal and stability covary with fitness

Thomas Blankers, Rik Lievers, Michiel Van Wijk & Astrid Groot
If sexual signals are costly, covariance between signal expression and fitness is expected. Signal-fitness covariance is important, because it can contribute to the maintenance of genetic variation in signals that are under natural or sexual selection. Chemical signals, such as female sex pheromones in moths, have traditionally been assumed to be species-recognition signals, but their relationship with fitness is unclear. Here we test whether chemical, conspecific mate finding signals covary with fitness in the moth...

Data from: A predictive model for improving placement of wind turbines to minimise collision risk potential for a large soaring raptor

Megan Murgatroyd, Willem Bouten & Arjun Amar
1. With the rapid growth of wind energy developments worldwide, it is critical that the negative impacts on wildlife are considered and mitigated. This includes minimising the numbers of large soaring raptors which are killed when they collide with wind turbines. 2. To reduce the likelihood of raptor collisions, turbines should be placed at locations which are least used by sensitive species. For resident or breeding species, this is often delineated crudely through the use...

2013 Machine Learning Data Set for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory - Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

David Fouhey, Meng Jin, Mark Cheung, Abndres Munoz-Jaramillo, Richard Galvez, Rajat Thomas, Paul Wright, Alexander Szenicer, Monica G. Bobra, Yang Liu & James Mason
We present a curated dataset from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission in a format suitable for machine learning research. Beginning from level 1 scientific products we have processed various instrumental corrections, downsampled to manageable spatial and temporal resolutions, and synchronized observations spatially and temporally. We anticipate this curated dataset will facilitate machine learning research in heliophysics and the physical sciences generally, increasing the scientific return of the SDO mission. This work is a...

Data from: Extinction-driven changes in frugivore communities on oceanic islands

Julia H. Heinen, E. Emiel Van Loon, Dennis M. Hansen & W. Daniel Kissling
Global change and human expansion have resulted in many species extinctions worldwide, but the geographic variation and determinants of extinction risk in particular guilds still remain little explored. Here, we quantified insular extinctions of frugivorous vertebrates (including birds, mammals and reptiles) across 74 tropical and subtropical oceanic islands within 20 archipelagos worldwide and investigated extinction in relation to island characteristics (island area, isolation, elevation and climate) and species’ functional traits (body mass, diet and ability...

Data from: Artificial light at night confounds broad-scale habitat use by migrating birds

James D. McLaren, Jeffrey J. Buler, Tim Schreckengost, Jaclyn A. Smolinsky, Matthew Boone, E. Emiel Van Loon, Deanna K. Dawson & Eric L. Walters
With many of the world's migratory bird populations in alarming decline, broad-scale assessments of responses to migratory hazards may prove crucial to successful conservation efforts. Most birds migrate at night through increasingly light-polluted skies. Bright light sources can attract airborne migrants and lead to collisions with structures, but might also influence selection of migratory stopover habitat and thereby acquisition of food resources. We demonstrate, using multi-year weather radar measurements of nocturnal migrants across the northeastern...

Data from: One QTL for intra- and interspecific variation in a sex pheromone

Astrid T. Groot, Heike Staudacher, Andrea Barthel, Olive Inglis, Richard G. Santangelo, Steffi Gebauer-Jung, Heiko Vogel, Jennifer Emerson, Coby Schal, David G. Heckel, Fred Gould & Gerhard Schoefl
Even though premating isolation is hypothesized to be a major driving force in speciation, its genetic basis is poorly known. In the noctuid moth Heliothis subflexa, one group of sex pheromone components, the acetates, emitted by the female, plays a crucial isolating role in preventing interspecific matings to males of the closely related Heliothis virescens, in which females do not produce acetates and males are repelled by them. We previously found intraspecific variation in acetates...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    15
  • 2020
    23
  • 2019
    22
  • 2018
    25
  • 2017
    22
  • 2016
    23
  • 2015
    11
  • 2014
    9
  • 2013
    2
  • 2012
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    155

Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    146
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    11
  • Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University
    9
  • Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan
    9
  • SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow
    9
  • Aarhus University
    8
  • NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    7
  • Wageningen University & Research
    7
  • Center for Data Science, New York University
    6
  • Lockheed Martin Solar & Astrophysics Laboratory
    6