23 Works

Data from: Greenhouse gas emissions from reservoir water surfaces: a new global synthesis

Bridget R. Deemer, John A. Harrison, Siyue Li, Jake J. Beaulieu, Tonya DelSontro, Nathan Barros, José F. Bezerra-Neto, Stephen M. Powers, Marco A. Dos Santos & J. Arie Vonk
Collectively, reservoirs created by dams are thought to be an important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. So far, efforts to quantify, model, and manage these emissions have been limited by data availability and inconsistencies in methodological approach. Here, we synthesize reservoir CH4, CO2, and N2O emission data with three main objectives: (1) to generate a global estimate of GHG emissions from reservoirs, (2) to identify the best predictors of these emissions, and...

Data from: Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids

David A. Puts, Alexander K. Hill, Drew H. Bailey, Robert S. Walker, Drew Rendall, John R. Wheatley, Lisa L. M. Welling, Khytam Dawood, Rodrigo A. Cárdenas, Robert P. Burriss, Nina G. Jablonski, Mark D. Shriver, Daniel J. Weiss, Adriano R. Lameira, Coren L. Apicella, Michael J. Owren, Claudia Barelli, Mary E. Glenn & Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez
In many primates, including humans, the vocalizations of males and females differ dramatically, with male vocalizations and vocal anatomy often seeming to exaggerate apparent body size. These traits may be favoured by sexual selection because low-frequency male vocalizations intimidate rivals and/or attract females, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested across primates, nor is it clear why competitors and potential mates should attend to vocalization frequencies. Here we show across anthropoids that sexual dimorphism...

Data from: A single 17D Yellow Fever vaccination provides lifelong immunity; characterization of Yellow-Fever-specific neutralizing antibody and T-cell responses after vaccination

Rosanne W. Wieten, Emile F. F. Jonker, Ester M. M. Van Leeuwen, Ester B. M. Remmerswaal, Ineke J. M. Ten Berge, Adriëtte W. De Visser, Perry J. J. Van Genderen, Abraham Goorhuis, Leo G. Visser, Martin P. Grobusch & Godelieve J. De Bree
Introduction: Prompted by recent amendments of Yellow Fever (YF) vaccination guidelines from boost to single vaccination strategy and the paucity of clinical data to support this adjustment, we used the profile of the YF-specific CD8+ T-cell subset profiles after primary vaccination and neutralizing antibodies as a proxy for potentially longer lasting immunity. Methods and Findings: PBMCs and serum were collected in six individuals on days 0, 3, 5, 12, 28 and 180, and in 99...

Data from: Seasonal detours by soaring migrants shaped by wind regimes along the East Atlantic Flyway

Wouter M. G. Vansteelant, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Willem Van Manen, Jan Van Diermen & Willem Bouten
Avian migrants often make substantial detours between their seasonal destinations. It is likely some species do this to make the most of predictable wind regimes along their respective flyways. We test this hypothesis by studying orientation behaviour of a long-distance soaring migrant in relation to prevailing winds along the East Atlantic Flyway. We tracked 62 migratory journeys of 12 adult European Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus with GPS loggers. Hourly fixes were annotated with local wind...

Data from: Nectar accessibility determines fitness, flower choice and abundance of hoverflies that provide natural pest control

Paul C.J. Van Rijn, Felix L. Wäckers & Paul C. J. Van Rijn
1. In modern agricultural landscapes many organisms providing ecosystem services such as pollination and natural pest control are likely constrained by shortage of nectar and/or pollen required for adult nutrition. More and more flower-rich field margin strips and other habitats are created to eliminate these constraints. For most target organisms, however, it is not well known which (types of) flowers are effective in providing suitable pollen and nectar. 2. We studied the suitability of a...

Data from: Holocene variability of an Amazonian hyperdominant

Mark B. Bush & Crystal N. H. McMichael
Little is known regarding the long-term stability or instability of Amazonian plant communities. We assessed whether the most abundant species, hyperdominants, may have risen to prominence at the Pleistocene–Holocene transition, following subsequent changes in moisture regimes, or as a result of human activity later in the Holocene. The fossil pollen history of the commonest western Amazonian tree, Iriartea deltoidea (hereafter Iriartea), is investigated using fossil pollen data from 13 lakes. Iriartea is a monospecific genus...

Data from: Factors essential for L,D-transpeptidase-mediated peptidoglycan cross-linking and β-lactam resistance in Escherichia coli

Christiane Bouchier, Jean-Emmanuel Hugonnet, Michel Arthur, Dominique Mengin-Lecreulx, Yves Brun, Michael Van Nieuwenhze, Louis B Rice, Alejandro Monton, Tanneke Den Blaauwen, Etienne Carbonnelle, Carole Veckerlé & Kuyek Tu
The target of β-lactam antibiotics is the D,D-transpeptidase activity of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) for synthesis of 4→3 cross-links in the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. Unusual 3→3 cross-links formed by L,D-transpeptidases were first detected in Escherichia coli more than four decades ago, however no phenotype has previously been associated with their synthesis. Here we show that production of the L,D-transpeptidase YcbB in combination with elevated synthesis of the (p)ppGpp alarmone by RelA lead to full...

Data from: Short distance migrants travel as far as long distance migrants in lesser black-backed gulls Larus fuscus

Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Joseph B. Burant, E. Emiel Van Loon, Willem Bouten & C. J. Camphuysen
Migration strategies differ greatly among and within avian populations. The associated trade-offs and fitness consequences of diverse strategies and how they persist are pertinent questions in migration research. Migration is a costly endeavour, presumably compensated for by better survival conditions in the non-breeding area. One way to assess the cost of alternative strategies is to investigate the investment in movement across the entire annual cycle, an assessment made increasingly feasible with improvements in tracking technology....

Data from: How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems

Els M. Van Der Zee, Christine Angelini, Laura L. Govers, Marjolijn J. A. Christianen, Andrew H. Altieri, Karin J. Van Der Reijden, Brian R. Silliman, Johan Van De Koppel, Matthijs Van Der Geest, Jan A. Van Gils, Henk W. Van Der Veer, Theunis Piersma, Peter C. De Ruiter, Han Olff & Tjisse Van Der Heide
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and...

Data from: Inter-annual variability and long-term trends in breeding success in a declining population of migratory swans

Kevin A. Wood, Julia L. Newth, Geoff M. Hilton, Bart A. Nolet & Eileen C. Rees
Population declines among migratory Arctic-breeding birds are a growing concern for conservationists. To inform the conservation of these declining populations, we need to understand how demographic rates such as breeding success are influenced by combinations of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In this study we examined inter-annual variation and long-term trends in two aspects of the breeding success of a migratory herbivore, the Bewick's swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii, which is currently undergoing a population decline: 1)...

Data from: Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, T. Mitchell Aide, Angélica M. Almeyda Zambrano, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Eben N. Broadbent, Robin L. Chazdon, Dylan Craven, Jarcilene S. De Almeida-Cortez, George A. L. Cabral, Ben H. J. De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan M. Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mario M. Espírito-Santo, María C. Fandino, Ricardo G. César, Jefferson S. Hall, José Luis Hernandez-Stefanoni, Catarina C. Jakovac … & Danaë M. A. Rozendaal
Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2, 3, 4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major...

Data from: How individual Montagu's Harriers cope with Moreau's Paradox during the Sahelian winter

Almut Ellinor Schlaich, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Ben Johannes Koks, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Hundreds of millions of Afro-Palaearctic migrants winter in the Sahel, a semi-arid belt south of the Sahara desert, where they experience deteriorating ecological conditions during their overwintering stay and have to prepare for spring migration when conditions are worst. This well-known phenomenon was first described by R.E. Moreau and is known ever since as Moreau's Paradox. However, empirical evidence of the deteriorating seasonal ecological conditions is limited and little is known on how birds respond....

Data from: Flap or soar? How a flight generalist responds to its aerial environment

E. Emiel Van Loon, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Willem Bouten, Christiaan Meijer & C. J. Camphuysen
The aerial environment is heterogeneous in space and time and directly influences the costs of animal flight. Volant animals can reduce these costs by using different flight modes, each with their own benefits and constraints. However, the extent to which animals alter their flight modes in response to environmental conditions has rarely been studied in the wild. To provide insight into how a flight generalist can reduce the energetic cost of movement, we studied flight...

Data from: Membrane potential dynamics of spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in V1 of awake mice

Quentin Perrenoud, Cyriel M. A. Pennartz & Luc J. Gentet
Cortical gamma activity (30–80 Hz) is believed to play important functions in neural computation and arises from the interplay of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV) and pyramidal cells (PYRs). However, the subthreshold dynamics underlying its emergence in the cortex of awake animals remain unclear. Here, we characterized the intracellular dynamics of PVs and PYRs during spontaneous and visually evoked gamma activity in layers 2/3 of V1 of awake mice using targeted patch-clamp recordings and synchronous local field...

Data from: Directed flight and optimal airspeeds: homeward-bound gulls react flexibly to wind yet fly slower than predicted

James D. McLaren, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, C J Camphuysen & Willem Bouten
Birds in flight are proposed to adjust their body orientation (heading) and airspeed to wind conditions adaptively according to time and energy constraints. Airspeeds in goal-directed flight are predicted to approach or exceed maximum-range airspeeds, which minimize transport costs (energy expenditure per unit distance) and should increase in headwinds and crosswinds. Diagnosis of airspeed adjustment is however obscured by uncertainty regarding birds' goal-directions, transport costs, interrelations with orientation strategy and the attainability of predicted behaviour....

Data from: Detection of genetic incompatibilities in non-model systems using simple genetic markers: hybrid breakdown in the haplodiploid spider mite Tetranychus evansi

Bram Knegt, Tomos Potter, Nigel A. Pearson, Yukie Sato, Heike Staudacher, Bernardus C.J. Schimmel, E. Toby Kiers & Martijn Egas
When two related species interbreed, their hybrid offspring frequently suffer from reduced fitness. The genetics of hybrid incompatibility are described by the Bateson–Dobzhansky–Muller (BDM) model, where fitness is reduced by epistatic interactions between alleles of heterospecific origin. Unfortunately, most empirical evidence for the BDM model comes from a few well-studied model organisms, restricting our genetic understanding of hybrid incompatibilities to limited taxa. These systems are predominantly diploid and incompatibility is often complete, which complicates the...

Data from: A Z-linked sterility locus causes sexual abstinence in hybrid females and facilitates speciation in Spodoptera frugiperda

Silvia Kost, David G. Heckel, Atsuo Yoshido, Frantisek Marec & Astrid T. Groot
In the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), two sympatric strains have been recognized that have been termed corn strain (C) and rice strain (R), referring to their most common host plants. Both strains are reproductively isolated via a distinct prezygotic barrier as well as via an intriguing postzygotic phenomenon: when R females have mated with C males, the resulting RC hybrid females exhibit dramatically reduced fertility independent of their mating partner. Here we demonstrate...

Data from: Scaring waterfowl as a management tool: how much more do geese forage after disturbance?

Bart A. Nolet, Andrea Kölzsch, Michiel Elderenbosch & Arie J. Van Noordwijk
With increasing numbers of many herbivorous waterfowl species, often foraging on farmland, the conflict with agriculture has intensified. One popular management tool is to scare birds off the land, often in association with shooting. However, the energy costs of flying are considerably higher than those of resting. Therefore, when birds fly off after a disturbance, they use extra energy that subsequently needs to be compensated. We used the white-fronted goose Anser albifrons, the most common...

Data from: Soaring across continents: decision-making of a soaring migrant under changing atmospheric conditions along an entire flyway

Wouter Vansteelant, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, James D. McLaren, Jan Van Diermen, Willem Bouten, Wouter M. G. Vansteelant & James McLaren
(1) Thermal soaring birds reduce flight-energy costs by alternatingly gaining altitude in thermals and gliding across the earth’s surface. To find out how soaring migrants adjust their flight behaviour to dynamic atmospheric conditions across entire migration routes, we combined optimal soaring migration theory with high-resolution GPS tracking data of migrating Honey Buzzards Pernis apivorus and wind data from a global numerical atmospheric model. (2) We compared measurements of gliding air speeds to predictions based on...

Data from: Latitudinal and altitudinal patterns of plant community diversity on mountain summits across the tropical Andes

Francisco Cuesta, Priscilla Muriel, Luis D. Llambí, Stephan Halloy, Nikolay Aguirre, Stephan Beck, Julieta Carilla, Rosa I. Meneses, Soledad Cuello, Alfredo Grau, Luis E. Gámez, Javier Irazábal, Jorge Jacome, Ricardo Jaramillo, Lirey Ramírez, Natalia Samaniego, David Suárez-Duque, Natali Thompson, Alfredo Tupayachi, Paul Viñas, Karina Yager, María T. Becerra, Harald Pauli & William D. Gosling
The high tropical Andes host one of the richest alpine floras of the world, with exceptionally high levels of endemism and turnover rates. Yet, little is known about the patterns and processes that structure altitudinal and latitudinal variation in plant community diversity. Herein we present the first continental-scale comparative study of plant community diversity on summits of the tropical Andes. Data were obtained from 792 permanent vegetation plots (1m2) within 50 summits, distributed along a...

Data from: The oldest actinopterygian highlights the cryptic early history of the hyperdiverse ray-finned fishes

Jing Lu, Sam Giles, Matt Friedman, Jan L. Den Blaauwen & Min Zhu
Osteichthyans comprise two divisions, each containing over 32,000 living species: Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods) and Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). Recent discoveries from China highlight the morphological disparity of early sarcopterygians and extend their origin into the late Silurian. By contrast, the oldest unambiguous actinopterygians are roughly 30 million years younger, leaving a long temporal gap populated by fragments and rare body fossils of controversial phylogenetic placement. Here we reinvestigate the enigmatic osteichthyan Meemannia from the...

Data from: Modelling flight heights of lesser black-backed gulls and great skuas from GPS: a Bayesian approach

Viola H. Ross-Smith, Chris B. Thaxter, Elizabeth A. Masden, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Niall H. K. Burton, Lucy J. Wright, Mark M. Rehfisch & Alison Johnston
Wind energy generation is increasing globally, and associated environmental impacts must be considered. The risk of seabirds colliding with offshore wind turbines is influenced by flight height, and flight height data usually come from observers on boats, making estimates in daylight in fine weather. GPS tracking provides an alternative and generates flight height information in a range of conditions, but the raw data have associated error. Here, we present a novel analytical solution for accommodating...

Data from: Historical colonization and dispersal limitation supplement climate and topography in shaping species richness of African lizards (Reptilia: Agaminae)

W. Daniel Kissling, Anne Blach-Overgaard, Roelof E. Zwaan & Philipp Wagner
To what extent deep-time dispersal limitation shapes present-day biodiversity at broad spatial scales remains elusive. Here, we compiled a continental dataset on the distributions of African lizard species in the reptile subfamily Agaminae (a relatively young, Neogene radiation of agamid lizards which ancestors colonized Africa from the Arabian peninsula) and tested to what extent historical colonization and dispersal limitation (i.e. accessibility from areas of geographic origin) can explain present-day species richness relative to current climate,...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    23

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    23

Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    23
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    3
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    2
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • Utrecht University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Federal University of Southern Bahia
    1
  • Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers
    1