22 Works

Data from: Frugivory-related traits promote speciation of tropical palms

Renske E. Onstein, William J. Baker, Thomas L. P. Couvreur, Søren Faurby, Jens-Christian Svenning & W. Daniel Kissling
Animal-mediated seed dispersal by frugivorous birds and mammals is central to the ecology and functioning of ecosystems, but whether and how frugivory-related traits have affected plant speciation remains little explored. Fruit size is directly linked to plant dispersal capacity and therefore influences gene flow and genetic divergence of plant populations. Using a global species-level phylogeny with comprehensive data on fruit sizes and plant species distributions, we test whether fruit size has affected speciation rates of...

Data from: Mauritius on fire: tracking historical human impacts on biodiversity loss

William D. Gosling, Jona De Kruif, Sietze J. Norder, Erik J. De Boer, Henry Hooghiemstra, Kenneth F. Rijsdijk, Crystal N.H. McMichael & Crystal N. H. McMichael
Fire was rare on Mauritius prior to human arrival (AD 1598); subsequently three phases of elevated fire activity occurred: c. 1630-1747, 1787-1833, and 1950-modern. Elevated fire frequency coincided with periods of high human impact evidenced from the historical record, and is linked to the extinction of island endemics.

Data from: Time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of pteropods

Alice K. Burridge, Christine Hörnlein, Arie W. Janssen, Martin Hughes, Stephanie L. Bush, Ferdinand Marlétaz, Rebeca Gasca, Annelies C. Pierrot-Bults, Ellinor Michel, Jonathan A. Todd, Jeremy R. Young, Karen J. Osborn, Steph B.J. Menken, Katja T.C.A. Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A. Peijnenburg & Steph B. J. Menken
Pteropods are a widespread group of holoplanktonic gastropod molluscs and are uniquely suitable for study of long-term evolutionary processes in the open ocean because they are the only living metazoan plankton with a good fossil record. Pteropods have been proposed as bioindicators to monitor the impacts of ocean acidification and in consequence have attracted considerable research interest, however, a robust evolutionary framework for the group is still lacking. Here we reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships and...

Data from: International collaboration and spatial dynamics of US patenting in Central and Eastern Europe 1981-2010

Mariann Leskó & Balázs Lengyel
How did post-socialist transition and a parallel shift in international labor division restructure regional innovation systems in Central and Eastern Europe? This question is increasingly important, because current EU innovation policy is combined with regional development in Smart Specialization Strategies; however, spatial trends of innovation in Central and Eastern Europe are not fully understood which might lead to less than perfectly efficient policy. In this paper we describe the spatial dynamics of inventor activity in...

Data from: Ecological dispersal barrier across the equatorial Atlantic in a migratory planktonic copepod

Erica Goetze, Patricia T. Hüdepohl, Chantel Chang, Lauren Van Woudenberg, Matthew Iacchei & Katja T.C.A. Peijnenburg
Resolving the large-scale genetic structure of plankton populations is important to understanding their responses to climate change. However, few studies have reported on the presence and geographic extent of genetically distinct populations of marine zooplankton at ocean-basin scales. Using mitochondrial sequence data (mtCOI, 718 animals) from 18 sites across a basin-scale Atlantic transect (39 N–40 S), we show that populations of the dominant migratory copepod, Pleuromamma xiphias, are genetically subdivided across subtropical and tropical waters...

Data from: Balancing food and density-dependence in the spatial distribution of an interference-prone forager

Adriaan Dokter, E. Emiel Van Loon, Cornelis Rappoldt, Kees Oosterbeek, Martin J. Baptist, Willem Bouten, Bruno J. Ens & Adriaan M. Dokter
Foraging distributions are thought to be density-dependent, because animals not only select for a high availability and quality of resources, but also avoid conspecific interference. Since these processes are confounded, their relative importance in shaping foraging distributions remains poorly understood. Here we aimed to rank the contribution of density-dependent and density-independent effects on the spatio-temporal foraging patterns of eurasian oystercatchers. In our intertidal study area, tides caused continuous variation in oystercatcher density, providing an opportunity...

Data from: Orientation of native versus translocated juvenile Lesser Spotted Eagles (Clanga pomarina) on the first autumn migration

Bernd Ulrich Meyburg, Ugis Bergmanis, Thorsten Langgemach, Kai Graszynski, Arno Hinz, Ingo Borner, Christiane Meyburg & Wouter M.G. Vansteelant
The ontogeny of migration routines used by wild birds remains unresolved. Here we investigated the migratory orientation of juvenile lesser spotted eagles (LSE) (Clanga pomarina) based on translocation and satellite tracking. Between 2004 and 2016, 85 second-hatched juveniles (Abels) were reared in captivity for release into the declining German population, including 50 birds that were translocated 940 km from Latvia. In 2009, we tracked 12 translocated juveniles, as well as 8 native juveniles and 9...

Data from: Stimulus discriminability may bias value-based probabilistic learning

Iris Schutte, Heleen A. Slagter, Anne G.E. Collins, Michael J. Frank, J. Leon Kenemans & Anne G. E. Collins
Reinforcement learning tasks are often used to assess participants' tendency to learn more from the positive or more from the negative consequences of one's action. However, this assessment often requires comparison in learning performance across different task conditions, which may differ in the relative salience or discriminability of the stimuli associated with more and less rewarding outcomes, respectively. To address this issue, in a first set of studies, participants were subjected to two versions of...

Data from: Internet blogs, polar bears, and climate-change denial by proxy

Jeffrey A. Harvey, Daphne Van Den Berg, Jacintha Ellers, Remko Kampen, Thomas W. Crowther, Peter Roessingh, Bart Verheggen, Rascha J. M. Nuijten, Eric Post, Stephan Lewandowsky, Ian Stirling, Meena Balgopal, Steven C. Amstrup & Michael E. Mann
Increasing surface temperatures, Arctic sea-ice loss, and other evidence of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) are acknowledged by every major scientific organization in the world. However, there is a wide gap between this broad scientific consensus and public opinion. Internet blogs have strongly contributed to this consensus gap by fomenting misunderstandings of AGW causes and consequences. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have become a “poster species” for AGW, making them a target of those denying AGW evidence....

Data from: Interacting effects of unobserved heterogeneity and individual stochasticity in the life-history of the Southern fulmar

Stéphanie Jenouvrier, Lise M. Aubry, Christophe Barbraud, Henri Weimerskirch & Hal Caswell
1.Individuals are heterogeneous in many ways. Some of these differences are incorporated as individual states (e.g., age, size, breeding status) in population models. However, substantial amounts of heterogeneity may remain unaccounted for, due to unmeasurable genetic, maternal, or environmental factors. 2.Such unobserved heterogeneity (UH) affects the behavior of heterogeneous cohorts via intra-cohort selection and contributes to inter-individual variance in demographic outcomes such as longevity and lifetime reproduction. Variance is also produced by individual stochasticity, due...

Data from: Delays and loss to follow up before treatment of drug-resistant TB following implementation of Xpert MTB/RIF in South Africa: a retrospective cohort study

Helen Cox, Lindy Dickson-Hall, Norbert Ndjeka, Anja Van't Hoog, Alison Grant, Frank Cobelens, Wendy Stevens, Mark Nicol & Anja Van’t Hoog
Background: South Africa has a large burden of rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (RR-TB), with 18,734 patients diagnosed in 2014. The number of diagnosed patients has increased substantially with the introduction of the Xpert MTB/RIF test, used for TB diagnosis for all patients with presumptive TB. Routine aggregate data suggest a large treatment gap (pre-treatment loss to follow up) between the numbers of laboratory confirmed RR-TB patients and those reported to have started second-line treatment. We aimed to...

Aboveground plant biomass and soil respiration for seven European shrublands under drought and warming manipulations (1998-2012)

S. Reinsch, E. Koller, A. Sowerby, G. De Dato, M. Estiarte, G. Guidolotti, E. Kovács-Láng, G Kröel-Dula, E. Lellei-Kovács, K.S. Larsen, D. Liberati, R Ogaya, J. Peñuelas, J. Ransijn, D.A. Robinson, I.K. Schmidt, A.R. Smith, A. Tietema, J.S. Dukes, C. Beier & B.A. Emmett
The data consists of annual measurements of standing aboveground plant biomass, annual aboveground net primary productivity and annual soil respiration between 1998 and 2012. Data were collected from seven European shrublands that were subject to the climate manipulations drought and warming. Sites were located in the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NL), Denmark ( two sites, DK-B and DK-M), Hungary (HU), Spain (SP) and Italy (IT). All field sites consisted of untreated control plots, plots...

Data from: Wind conditions and geography shape the first outbound migration of juvenile honey buzzards and their distribution across sub-Saharan Africa

Wouter M. G. Vansteelant, Jaana Kekkonen & Patrik Byholm
Contemporary tracking studies reveal that low migratory connectivity between breeding and non-breeding ranges is common in migrant landbirds. It is unclear, however, how internal factors and early-life experiences of individual migrants shape the development of their migration routes and concomitant population-level non-breeding distributions. Stochastic wind conditions and geography may determine whether and where migrants end up by the end of their journey. We tested this hypothesis by satellite-tagging 31 fledgling honey buzzards Pernis apivorus from...

Data from: Comparison of T2*-weighted and QSM contrasts in Parkinson's disease to visualize the STN with MRI

Anneke Alkemade, Gilles De Hollander, Max C. Keuken, Andreas Schäfer, Derek V.M. Ott, David Weise, Sonja A. Kotz, Birte U. Forstmann & Derek V. M. Ott
The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role in the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies investigating optimal protocols for STN visualization using state of the art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown that susceptibility weighted images, which display the magnetic susceptibility distribution, yield better results than T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and T2*-weighted contrasts. However, these findings are based on young healthy individuals, and require validation in elderly individuals and persons suffering from PD. Using...

Data from: Atmospheric conditions create freeways, detours and tailbacks for migrating birds

Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Felix Liechti & Wouter M. G. Vansteelant
The extraordinary adaptations of birds to contend with atmospheric conditions during their migratory flights have captivated ecologists for decades. During the 21st century technological advances have sparked a revival of research into the influence of weather on migrating birds. Using biologging technology, flight behaviour is measured across entire flyways, weather radar networks quantify large-scale migratory fluxes, citizen scientists gather observations of migrant birds and mechanistic models are used to simulate migration in dynamic aerial environments....

Data from: Artificial light at night confounds broad-scale habitat use by migrating birds

James D. McLaren, Jeffrey J. Buler, Tim Schreckengost, Jaclyn A. Smolinsky, Matthew Boone, E. Emiel Van Loon, Deanna K. Dawson & Eric L. Walters
With many of the world's migratory bird populations in alarming decline, broad-scale assessments of responses to migratory hazards may prove crucial to successful conservation efforts. Most birds migrate at night through increasingly light-polluted skies. Bright light sources can attract airborne migrants and lead to collisions with structures, but might also influence selection of migratory stopover habitat and thereby acquisition of food resources. We demonstrate, using multi-year weather radar measurements of nocturnal migrants across the northeastern...

Data from: Isotopic methods for non-destructive assessment of carbon dynamics in shrublands under long-term climate change manipulation

Louise C. Andresen, Maria T. Dominguez, Sabine Reinsch, Andy R. Smith, Inger Kappel Schmidt, Per Ambus, Claus Beier, Pascal Boeckx, Roland Bol, Giovanbattista De Dato, Bridget A. Emmett, Marc Estiarte, Mark H. Garnett, György Kröel-Dulay, Sharon L. Mason, Cecilie S. Nielsen, Josep Penuelas, Albert Tietema & Andrew R. Smith
1.Long-term climate change experiments are extremely valuable for studying ecosystem responses to environmental change. Examination of the vegetation and the soil should be non-destructive to guarantee long-term research. In this paper, we review field methods using isotope techniques for assessing carbon dynamics in the plant-soil-air continuum, based on recent field experience and examples from a European climate change manipulation network. 2.Eight European semi-natural shrubland ecosystems were exposed to warming and drought manipulations. One field site...

Data from: Identification of the submergence tolerance QTL come quick drowning1 (CQD1) in Arabidopsis thaliana

Melis Akman, Rogier Kleine, Peter H. Van Tienderen & Eric M. Schranz
Global climate change is predicted to increase water precipitation fluctuations and lead to localized prolonged floods in agricultural fields and natural plant communities. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of submergence tolerance is crucial in order to improve plant survival under these conditions. In this study, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in Arabidopsis to identify novel candidate genes for increased submergence tolerance by using Kas-1 and Col (gl1) parental accessions and their derived...

Data from: Extinction-driven changes in frugivore communities on oceanic islands

Julia H. Heinen, E. Emiel Van Loon, Dennis M. Hansen & W. Daniel Kissling
Global change and human expansion have resulted in many species extinctions worldwide, but the geographic variation and determinants of extinction risk in particular guilds still remain little explored. Here, we quantified insular extinctions of frugivorous vertebrates (including birds, mammals and reptiles) across 74 tropical and subtropical oceanic islands within 20 archipelagos worldwide and investigated extinction in relation to island characteristics (island area, isolation, elevation and climate) and species’ functional traits (body mass, diet and ability...

Data from: Vocal foragers and silent crowds: context-dependent vocal variation in Northeast Atlantic long-finned pilot whales

Fleur Visser, Annebelle C. M. Kok, M. G. Oudejans, Lindesay A. S. Scott-Hayward, Stacy L. DeRuiter, Ana C. Alves, Ricardo N. Antunes, Saana Isojunno, Graham J. Pierce, Hans Slabbekoorn, Jef Huisman, Patrick J. O. Miller & Annebelle C.M. Kok
Vocalisations form a key component of the social interactions and foraging behaviour of toothed whales. We investigated changes in calling and echolocation behaviour of long-finned pilot whales between foraging and non-foraging periods, by combining acoustic recordings and diving depth data from tagged individuals with concurrent surface observations on social behaviour of their group. The pilot whales showed marked vocal variation, specific to foraging and social context. During periods of foraging, pilot whales showed more vocal...

Data from: A circannual perspective on daily and total flight distances in a long-distance migratory raptor, the Montagu's harrier, Circus pygargus

Almut E. Schlaich, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Henning Heldbjerg, Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Iben H. Sørensen, Alexandre Villers & Christiaan Both
Long-distance migrants are particularly recognized for the distances covered on migration, yet little is known about the distances they cover during the rest of the year. GPS-tracks of 29 Montagu's harriers from breeding areas in France, The Netherlands and Denmark showed that harriers fly between 35 653 and 88 049 km yr−1, of which on average only 28.5% is on migration. Mean daily distances during migration were 296 km d−1 in autumn and 252 km...

Data from: The positive side of a negative reference: the delay between linguistic processing and common ground

Edmundo Kronmüller, Ira Noveck, Natalia Rivera, Francisco Jaume-Guazzini & Dale Barr
Interlocutors converge on names to refer to entities. For example, a speaker might refer to a novel looking object as the jellyfish and, once identified, the listener will too. The hypothesized mechanism behind such referential precedents is a subject of debate. The common ground view claims that listeners register the object as well as the identity of the speaker who coined the label. The linguistic view claims that, once established, precedents are treated by listeners...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • University of Amsterdam
    22
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Copenhagen
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • VU University Amsterdam
    1
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Institute of Ecology and Botany
    1