293 Works

ShoreView Continuous Geo-referenced Imagery and Data

Norman Duke, Jock Mackenzie, Adam Canning & Franz Eilert
The overall project strategy is called the Coastal Health Archive and Monitoring Program (CHAMP). High resolution panolapse imagery & overlapping images with continuous views of the intertidal shorelines of northern tropical Australia. The category of data includes - aerial shoreline imagery - the extent acquired over the last decade has been approximately 10,000 km from Broome to Cairns, including key islands in Torres Strait. Imagery have been collected using high resolution cameras from low flying...

Ecological and social constraints combine to promote evolution of non-breeding strategies in clownfish

Rebecca Branconi, Tina Barbasch, Robin Francis, Maya Srinivasan, Geoffrey Jones & Peter Buston
Individuals that forgo their own reproduction in animal societies represent an evolutionary paradox because it is not immediately apparent how natural selection can preserve the genes that underlie non-breeding strategies. Cooperative breeding theory provides a solution to the paradox: non-breeders benefit by helping relatives and/or inheriting breeding positions; non-breeders do not disperse to breed elsewhere because of ecological constraints. However, the question of why non-breeders do not contest to breed within their group has rarely...

The role of fishes as food: A functional perspective on predator-prey interactions

Michalis Mihalitsis, Christopher R. Hemingson, Christopher R. Goatley & David R. Bellwood
Every animal dies. In nature, mortality usually occurs due to predation by other animals. One of the fundamental consequences of mortality is the transfer of energy and nutrients from one organism (prey) to another (predator). On coral reefs, these key interactions and processes, that are essential for ecosystem functioning, are primarily mediated by fishes; up to 53% of fishes on coral reefs can be regarded as piscivorous. To date, piscivory on coral reefs has been...

Fear effects and group size interact to shape herbivory on coral reefs

Andrew Bauman, Andrew Hoey, Glenn Dunshea, Jenny Fong, Ian Chan & Peter Todd
1. Fear of predators (‘fear effects’) are an important determinant of foraging decisions by consumers across a range of ecosystems. Group size is one of the main behavioural mechanisms for mitigating fear effects but also provides foraging benefits to group members. Within coral reef ecosystems, fear effects have been shown to influence the feeding rates of herbivorous fishes (i.e. browsers), a key functional group that prevent macroalgal overgrowth. Yet, how fear effects and group size...

Barriers in a sea of elasmobranchs

Maximilian Hirschfeld, Christine Dudgeon, Marcus Sheaves & Adam Barnett
Background The interplay of animal dispersal and environmental heterogeneity is fundamental for the distribution of biodiversity on earth. In the ocean, the interaction of physical barriers and dispersal has primarily been examined for organisms with planktonic larvae. Animals that lack a planktonic life stage and depend on active dispersal are however likely to produce distinctive patterns. Methods We used available literature on population genetics and phylogeography of elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates), to examine how...

Data from: Seascape genetics along environmental gradients in the Arabian Peninsula: insights from ddRAD sequencing of anemonefishes

Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Joseph D. DiBattista, Marek J. Piatek, Michelle R. Gaither, Hugo B. Harrison, Gerrit B. Nanninga & Michael L. Berumen
Understanding the processes that shape patterns of genetic structure across space is a central aim of landscape genetics. However, it remains unclear how geographic features and environmental variables shape gene flow, particularly for marine species in large complex seascapes. Here, we evaluated the genomic composition of the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus across its entire geographic range in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, as well as its close relative, Amphiprion omanensis endemic to the...

Data from: Influence of the geography of speciation on current patterns of coral reef fish biodiversity across the Indo-Pacific

Théo Gaboriau, Fabien Leprieur, David Mouillot & Nicolas Hubert
The role of speciation processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns represents a major scientific question for ecologists and biogeographers. Hence, numerous methods have been developed to determine the geography of speciation based on co-occurrence between sister-species. Most of these methods rely on the correlation between divergence time and several metrics based on the geographic ranges of sister-taxa (i.e. overlap, asymmetry). The relationship between divergence time and these metrics has scarcely been examined in a spatial...

Data from: Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization: a test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites

Susan G. Letcher, Jesse R. Lasky, Robin L. Chazdon, Natalia Norden, S. Joseph Wright, Jorge A. Meave, Eduardo A. Pérez-García, Rodrigo Muñoz, Eunice Romero-Pérez, Ana Andrade, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Tony V. Bentos, Radika Bhaskar, Frans Bongers, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Ricardo G. César, Deborah A. Clark, David B. Clark, Dylan Craven, Alexander DeFrancesco, Juan M. Dupuy, Bryan Finegan … & G. Bruce Williamson
1. Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late successional stages in wet forest. 2....

Data from: Temperature-related variation in growth rate, size, maturation, and lifespan in a marine herbivorous fish over a latitudinal gradient

Elizabeth D. L. Trip, Kendall D. Clements, David Raubenheimer & J. Howard Choat
1. In ectotherms, growth rate, body size, and maturation rate co-vary with temperature, with the direction and magnitude of variation predicted by the Temperature-Size Rule (TSR). Nutritional quality or availability of food, however, may vary over latitudinal gradients, resulting in ambiguous effects on body size and maturation rate. The Temperature-Constraint Hypothesis (TCH) predicts that marine herbivorous ectotherms are nutritionally compromised at latitudes exceeding 30o. This provides an opportunity to resolve the contrasting demographic responses of...

Data from: Regional environmental pressure influences population differentiation in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

S. G. Vandamme, G. E. Maes, J. A. M. Raeymaekers, K. Cottenie, A. K. Imsland, B. Hellemans, G. Lacroix, E. Mac Aoidh, J. T. Martinsohn, P. Martínez, J. Robbens, R. Vilas & F. A. M. Volckaert
Unravelling the factors shaping the genetic structure of mobile marine species is challenging due to the high potential for gene flow. However, genetic inference can be greatly enhanced by increasing the genomic, geographic or environmental resolution of population genetic studies. Here we investigated the population structure of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) by screening 17 random and gene-linked markers in 999 individuals at 290 geographical locations throughout the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. A seascape genetics approach with the...

Data from: Congruent patterns of connectivity can inform management for broadcast spawning corals on the Great Barrier Reef

Lukoschek Vimoksalehi, Cynthia Riginos, Madeleine J.H. Van Oppen, Madeleine J. H. Van Oppen & Vimoksalehi Lukoschek
Connectivity underpins the persistence and recovery of marine ecosystems. The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem and managed by an extensive network of no-take zones; however, information about connectivity was not available to optimize the network's configuration. We use multivariate analyses, Bayesian clustering algorithms and assignment tests of the largest population genetic data set for any organism on the GBR to date (Acropora tenuis, >2500 colonies; >50 reefs, genotyped for...

Data from: Large-scale, multi-directional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

David H. Williamson, Hugo B. Harrison, Glenn R. Almany, Michael L. Berumen, Michael Bode, Mary C. Bonin, Severine Choukroun, Peter J. Doherty, Ashley J. Frisch, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo & Geoffrey P. Jones
Larval dispersal is the key process by which populations of most marine fishes and invertebrates are connected and replenished. Advances in larval tagging and genetics have enhanced our capacity to track larval dispersal, assess scales of population connectivity, and quantify larval exchange among no-take marine reserves and fished areas. Recent studies have found that reserves can be a significant source of recruits for populations up to 40 km away, but the scale and direction of...

Data from: Extending ecological niche models to the past 120 000 years corroborates the lack of strong phylogeographic structure in the Crested Drongo (Dicrurus forficatus forficatus) on Madagascar

Jérôme Fuchs, Juan L. Parra, Steven M. Goodman, Marie Jeanne Raherilalao, Jeremy Vanderwal & Rauri C. K. Bowie
We conduct a phylogeographic study of the Crested Drongo (Dicrurus forficatus forficatus), a broadly distributed bird species on Madagascar. We first determined the demographic and spatial pattern inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear data, and then compared these results with predictions from a present to 0.120-Myr-old reconstruction of the spatial dynamics of the range of D. f. forficatus on Madagascar, enabling putative areas of stability (lineage persistence) to be detected. Weak genetic structure along an east–west...

Data from: Rates of population differentiation and speciation are decoupled in sea snakes

Charlotte R. Nitschke, Mathew Hourston, Vinay Udyawer & Kate L. Sanders
Comparative phylogeography can inform many macroevolutionary questions, such as whether species diversification is limited by rates of geographic population differentiation. We examined the link between population genetic structure and species diversification in the fully aquatic sea snakes (Hydrophiinae) by comparing mitochondrial phylogeography in 16 species from two closely related clades that show contrasting diversification dynamics across northern Australia. Contrary to expectations from theory and several empirical studies, our results show that, at the geographic scale...

Data from: Realistic heat pulses protect frogs from disease under simulated rainforest frog thermal regimes

Sasha E. Greenspan, Deborah S. Bower, Rebecca J. Webb, Elizabeth A. Roznik, Lisa A. Stevenson, Lee Berger, Gerry Marantelli, David A. Pike, Lin Schwarzkopf & Ross A. Alford
Recent emergences of fungal diseases have caused catastrophic global losses of biodiversity. Temperature is one of the most important factors influencing host-fungus associations but the effects of temperature variability on disease development are rarely examined. The chytrid pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has had severe effects on populations of hundreds of rainforest-endemic amphibian species but we know little about the effects of rainforest-specific host body temperature cycles on infection patterns. To address this challenge, we used...

Data from: Responses of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity related genes to elevated CO2 levels in the brain of three teleost species

Floriana Lai, Cathrine E. Fagernes, Nicholas J. Bernier, Gabrielle M. Miller, Philip L. Munday, Fredrik Jutfelt & Göran E. Nilsson
The continuous increase of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting in ocean acidification has been reported to affect brain function in some fishes. During adulthood, cell proliferation is fundamental for fish brain growth and for it to adapt in response to external stimuli, such as environmental changes. Here we report the first expression study of genes regulating neurogenesis and neuroplasticity in brains of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), cinnamon anemonefish (Amphiprion melanopus) and spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis...

Data from: Searching for common threads in threadfins: phylogeography of Australian Polynemids in space and time

John B. Horne, Paolo Momigliano, David J. Welch, Stephen J. Newman, Lynne Van Herwerden, JB Horne & SJ Newman
Proper management of marine fisheries requires an understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of marine populations, which can be obtained from genetic data. While numerous fisheries species have been surveyed for spatial genetic patterns, temporally sampled genetic data is not available for many species. Here we present a phylogeographic survey of the king threadfin, Polydactylus macrochir, across its species range in northern Australia and at a temporal scale of one and ten years. Spatially...

Data from: Worldwide patterns of genetic differentiation imply multiple \"domestications\" of Aedes aegypti, a major vector of human diseases

Julia E. Brown, Carolyn S. McBride, Petrina Johnson, Scott Ritchie, Christophe Paupy, Hervé Bossin, Joel Lutomiah, Ildefonso Fernandez-Salas, Alongkot Ponlawat, Anthony J. Cornel, William C. Black, Norma Gorrochotegui-Escalante, Ludmel Urdaneta-Marquez, Massamba Sylla, Michel Slotman, Kristy O. Murray, Christopher Walker, Jeffrey R. Powell & W. C. Black
Understanding the processes by which species colonize and adapt to human habitats is particularly important in the case of disease-vectoring arthropods. The mosquito species Aedes aegypti, a major vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses, probably originated as a wild, zoophilic species in sub-Saharan Africa, where some populations still breed in tree holes in forested habitats. Many populations of the species, however, have evolved to thrive in human habitats and to bite humans. This includes...

Data from: Intraspecific support for the polygyny-vs.-polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda

Zeng-Qiang Qian, Helge Schlüns, Birgit C Schlick-Steiner, Florian M Steiner, Simon K A Robson, Ellen A Schlüns & Ross H Crozier
The number of queens per colony and the number of matings per queen are the most important determinants of the genetic structure of ant colonies, and understanding their interrelationship is essential to the study of social evolution. The polygyny-versus-polyandry hypothesis argues that polygyny and polyandry should be negatively associated since both can result in increased intracolonial genetic variability and have costs. However, evidence for this long-debated hypothesis has been lacking at the intraspecific level. Here,...

Data from: Deltamethrin resistance in Aedes aegypti results in treatment failure in Merida, Mexico

Gonzalo M. Vazquez-Prokopec, Anuar Medina-Barreiro, Azael Che-Mendoza, Felipe Dzul-Manzanilla, Fabian Correa-Morales, Guillermo Guillermo-May, Wilbert Bibiano-Marin, Valentin Uc-Puc, Eduardo Geded-Moreno, Jose Vadillo-Sanches, Jorge Palacio-Vargas, Scott A. Ritchie, Audrey Lenhart, Pablo Manrique-Saide & José Vadillo-Sánchez
The operational impact of deltamethrin resistance on the efficacy of indoor insecticide applications to control Aedes aegypti was evaluated in Merida, Mexico. A randomized controlled trial quantified the efficacy of indoor residual spraying (IRS) against adult Ae. aegypti in houses treated with either deltamethrin (to which local Ae. aegypti expressed a high degree of resistance) or bendiocarb (to which local Ae. aegypti were fully susceptible) as compared to untreated control houses. All adult Ae. aegypti...

Data from: Logging and indigenous hunting impacts on persistence of large Neotropical animals

Anand Roopsind, T. Trevor Caughlin, Hemchandranauth Sambhu, Jose M.V. Fragoso, Francis E. Putz., Francis E. Putz & Jose M. V. Fragoso
Areas allocated for industrial logging and community-owned forests account for over 50% of all remaining tropical forests. Landscape-scale conservation strategies that include these forests are expected to have substantial benefits for biodiversity, especially for large mammals and birds that require extensive habitat but that are susceptible to extirpation due to synergies between logging and hunting. In addition, their responses to logging alone are poorly understood due to their cryptic behavior and low densities. In this...

Data from: Stream nitrogen concentration, but not plant N-fixing capacity, modulates litter diversity effects on decomposition

Alan M. Tonin, Luz Boyero, Silvia Monroy, Ana Basaguren, Javier Perez, Richard G. Pearson, Bradley J. Cardinale, & Jesus Pozo
1. We are facing major biodiversity loss and there is evidence that such loss can alter ecosystem functioning. However, the effects of plant diversity on decomposition – a key component of the global carbon cycle – are still unclear. A recent study suggested that a plant trait – their nitrogen (N)-fixing capacity – could mediate effects of litter diversity on decomposition by means of a microbial transfer of N from N-fixers to non-fixers. 2. We...

Data from: Reef accessibility impairs the protection of sharks

Jean-Baptiste Juhel, Laurent Vigliola, David Mouillot, Michel Kulbicki, Tom B. Letessier, Jessica J. Meeuwig & Laurent Wantiez
1. Reef sharks are declining worldwide under ever increasing fishing pressure with potential consequences on ecosystem functioning. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are currently one of the management tools to counteract the pervasive impacts of fishing. However, MPAs in which reef sharks are abundant tend to be located in remote and underexploited areas preventing a fair assessment of management effectiveness beyond remoteness from human activities. 2. Here we determine the conditions under which MPAs can effectively...

Data from: Maternal investment increases with altitude in a frog on the Tibetan plateau

Wei Chen, David A. Pike, Z. H. Tang, X. G. Fan & Y. Wang
Reproducing females can allocate energy between the production of eggs of different size or number, both of which can strongly influence fitness. Environmental conditions often drive these reproductive tradeoffs, because of direct influences on offspring survival. Many vertebrates show positive relationships between female body size and altitude, resulting in the production of larger clutches at higher altitudes. We report a different tradeoff in the high-altitude endemic frog Rana kukunoris (n=11 populations, 2000-3500 m): females living...

Data from: Limited ecological population connectivity suggests low demands on self-recruitment in a tropical inshore marine fish (Eleutheronema tetradactylum: Polynemidae)

John B Horne, Paolo Momigliano, David J Welch, Stephen J Newman & Lynne Van Herwerden
The diversity of geographic scales at which marine organisms display genetic variation mirrors the biophysical and ecological complexity of dispersal by pelagic larvae. Yet little is known about the effect of larval ecology on genetic population patterns, partly because detailed data of larval ecology do not yet exist for most taxa. One species for which this data is available is Eleutheronema tetradactylum, a tropical Indo-West Pacific shorefish. Here, we use a partial sequence mitochondrial cytochrome...

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