14 Works

Data from: Hierarchical behaviour, habitat use and species size differences shape evolutionary outcomes of hybridization in a coral reef fish.

Ashton Gainsford, Lynne Van Herwerden & Geoffrey P. Jones
Hybridization is an important evolutionary process, with ecological and behavioural factors influencing gene exchange between hybrids and parent species. Patterns of hybridization in anemonefishes may result from living in highly specialized habitats and breeding status regulated by size-based hierarchal social groups. Here morphological, ecological and genetic analyses in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea examine the hybrid status of Amphiprion leucokranos, a nominal species and presumed hybrid between Amphiprion sandaracinos and Amphiprion chrysopterus. We test the...

Data from: Does genetic distance between parental species influence outcomes of hybridisation among coral reef butterflyfishes?

Stefano R. Montanari, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Morgan S. Pratchett, Line K. Bay & Lynne Van Herwerden
Christmas Island is located at the overlap of the Indian and Pacific Ocean marine provinces and is a hot spot for marine hybridization. Here, we evaluate the ecological framework and genetic consequences of hybridization between butterflyfishes Chaetodon guttatissimus and Chaetodon punctatofasciatus. Further, we compare our current findings to those from a previous study of hybridization between Chaetodon trifasciatus and Chaetodon lunulatus. For both species groups, habitat and dietary overlap between parental species facilitate frequent heterospecific...

Data from: The effect of virus-blocking Wolbachia on male competitiveness of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti

Michal Segoli, Ary A. Hoffmann, Jane Lloyd, Gavin J. Omodei & Scott A. Ritchie
Background: The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia blocks the transmission of dengue virus by its vector mosquito Aedes aegypti, and is currently being evaluated for control of dengue outbreaks. Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) that results in the developmental failure of offspring in the cross between Wolbachia-infected males and uninfected females. This increases the relative success of infected females in the population, thereby enhancing the spread of the beneficial bacterium. However, Wolbachia spread via CI will only...

Data from: Local genetic patchiness but no regional differences between Indo-West Pacific populations of the dogtooth tuna Gymnosarda unicolor

Blair P. Bentley, Euan S. Harvey, Stephen J. Newman, David J. Welch, Adam K. Smith, Winn J. Kennington, DJ Welch, ES Harvey, SJ Newman, BP Bentley & WJ Kennington
Physical barriers can have profound impacts on dispersal in marine species. Here, we investigate population structure and levels of relatedness among individuals of the coral reef associated fish, the dogtooth tuna Gymnosarda unicolor, collected from 15 sites across the Indo-West Pacific region. We screened 92 individuals for genetic variation at 13 nuclear microsatellite loci and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene. We detected no genetic differentiation between ocean basins or between...

Data from: Sediment and turbidity associated with offshore dredging increase coral disease prevalence on nearby reefs

F. Joseph Pollock, Joleah B. Lamb, Stuart N. Field, Scott F. Heron, Britta Schaffelke, George Shedrawi, David G. Bourne & Bette L. Willis
In recent decades, coral reef ecosystems have declined to the extent that reefs are now threatened globally. While many water quality parameters have been proposed to contribute to reef declines, little evidence exists conclusively linking specific water quality parameters with increased disease prevalence in situ. Here we report evidence from in situ coral health surveys confirming that chronic exposure to dredging-associated sediment plumes significantly increase the prevalence of white syndromes, a devastating group of globally...

Data from: Microhabitats in the tropics buffer temperature in a globally coherent manner

Brett R. Scheffers, Theodore A. Evans, Stephen E. Williams & David P. Edwards
Vegetated habitats contain a variety of fine-scale features that can ameliorate temperate extremes. These buffered microhabitats may be used by species to evade extreme weather and novel climates in the future. Yet, the magnitude and extent of this buffering on a global scale remains unknown. Across all tropical continents and using 36 published studies, we assessed temperature buffering from within microhabitats across various habitat strata and structures (e.g. soil, logs, epiphytes and tree holes) and...

Data from: Aerobic scope predicts dominance during early life in a tropical damselfish

Shaun S. Killen, Matthew D. Mitchell, Jodie L. Rummer, Douglas P. Chivers, Maud C. O. Ferrari, Mark I. McCormick & Mark G. Meekan
A range of physiological traits are linked with aggression and dominance within social hierarchies, but the role of individual aerobic capacity in facilitating aggression has seldom been studied. Further, links previously observed between an individual's metabolic rate and aggression level may be context dependent and modulated by factors such as social stress and competitor familiarity. We examined these issues in juvenile Ambon damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, which display intraspecific competition for territories during settlement on coral...

Data from: Larval settlement: the role of surface topography for sessile coral reef invertebrates

Steve Whalan, Muhammad A. Abdul Wahab, Susanne Sprungala, Andrew J. Poole & Rocky De Nys
For sessile marine invertebrates with complex life cycles, habitat choice is directed by the larval phase. Defining which habitat-linked cues are implicated in sessile invertebrate larval settlement has largely concentrated on chemical cues which are thought to signal optimal habitat. There has been less effort establishing physical settlement cues, including the role of surface microtopography. This laboratory based study tested whether surface microtopography alone (without chemical cues) plays an important contributing role in the settlement...

Data from: Prediction of phylogeographic endemism in an environmentally complex biome.

Ana Carolina Carnaval, Eric Waltari, Miguel T. Rodrigues, Dan Rosauer, Jeremy VanDerWal, Roberta Damasceno, Ivan Prates, Maria Strangas, Zoe Spanos, Danielle Rivera, Marcio R. Pie, Carina R. Firkowski, Marcos R. Bornschein, Luiz F. Ribeiro & Craig Moritz
Phylogeographic endemism, the degree to which the history of recently evolved lineages is spatially restricted, reflects fundamental evolutionary processes such as cryptic divergence, adaptation and biological responses to environmental heterogeneity. Attempts to explain the extraordinary diversity of the tropics, which often includes deep phylogeographic structure, frequently invoke interactions of climate variability across space, time and topography. To evaluate historical versus contemporary drivers of phylogeographic endemism in a tropical system, we analyse the effects of current...

Data from: Do evolutionary constraints on thermal performance manifest at different organizational scales?

Ben L. Phillips, John Llewelyn, Amberlee Hatcher, Stewart Macdonald & Craig Moritz
The two foremost hypotheses on the evolutionary constraints on an organism's thermal sensitivity – the hotter-is-better expectation, and the specialist–generalist trade-off – have received mixed support from empirical studies testing for their existence. Could these conflicting results reflect confusion regarding the organizational level (i.e. species > population > individual) at which these constraints should manifest? We propose that these evolutionary constraints should manifest at different organizational levels because of differences in their underlying causes and...

Data from: Maternal investment increases with altitude in a frog on the Tibetan plateau

Wei Chen, David A. Pike, Z. H. Tang, X. G. Fan & Y. Wang
Reproducing females can allocate energy between the production of eggs of different size or number, both of which can strongly influence fitness. Environmental conditions often drive these reproductive tradeoffs, because of direct influences on offspring survival. Many vertebrates show positive relationships between female body size and altitude, resulting in the production of larger clutches at higher altitudes. We report a different tradeoff in the high-altitude endemic frog Rana kukunoris (n=11 populations, 2000-3500 m): females living...

Data from: You are what you eat: diet-induced chemical crypsis in a coral-feeding reef fish

Rohan M. Brooker, Philip L. Munday, Douglas P. Chivers & Geoffrey P. Jones
The vast majority of research into the mechanisms of camouflage has focused on forms that confound visual perception. However, many organisms primarily interact with their surroundings using chemosensory systems and may have evolved mechanisms to ‘blend in’ with chemical components of their habitat. One potential mechanism is ‘chemical crypsis' via the sequestration of dietary elements, causing a consumer's odour to chemically match that of its prey. Here, we test the potential for chemical crypsis in...

Data from: Tree-hugging koalas demonstrate a novel thermoregulatory mechanism for arboreal mammals

Natalie J. Briscoe, Kathrine A. Handasyde, Stephen R. Griffiths, Warren P. Porter, Andrew Krockenberger & Michael R. Kearney
How climate impacts organisms depends not only on their physiology, but also whether they can buffer themselves against climate variability via their behaviour. One of the way species can withstand hot temperatures is by seeking out cool microclimates, but only if their habitat provides such refugia. Here, we describe a novel thermoregulatory strategy in an arboreal mammal, the koala Phascolarctos cinereus. During hot weather, koalas enhanced conductive heat loss by seeking out and resting against...

Data from: Stepping inside the niche: microclimate data are critical for accurate assessment of species’ vulnerability to climate change

Collin Storlie, Andres Merino-Viteri, Benjamin Phillips, Jeremy VanDerWal, Justin Welbergen & Stephen Williams
To assess a species' vulnerability to climate change, we commonly use mapped environmental data that are coarsely resolved in time and space. Coarsely resolved temperature data are typically inaccurate at predicting temperatures in microhabitats used by an organism and may also exhibit spatial bias in topographically complex areas. One consequence of these inaccuracies is that coarsely resolved layers may predict thermal regimes at a site that exceed species' known thermal limits. In this study, we...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • James Cook University
    14
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    4
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • University of Saskatchewan
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • Southern Cross University
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1