46 Works

Data from: Efficiency of ddRAD target enriched sequencing across spiny rock lobster species (Palinuridae: Jasus)

Carla A. Souza, Nicholas Murphy, Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Laura N. Woodings, Irina Ilyushkina, Cristian E. Hernandez, Bridget S. Green, James J. Bell & Jan M. Strugnell
Double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) and target capture sequencing methods are used to explore population and phylogenetic questions in non-model organisms. ddRADseq offers a simple and reliable protocol for population genomic studies, however it can result in a large amount of missing data due to allelic dropout. Target capture sequencing offers an opportunity to increase sequencing coverage with little missing data and consistent orthologous loci across samples, although this approach has generally been...

Data from: Sibling species of mutualistic Symbiodinium clade G from bioeroding sponges in the western Pacific and western Atlantic oceans

Blake D. Ramsby, Malcolm S. Hill, Daniel J. Thornhill, Sieuwkje F. Steenuizen, Michelle Achlatis, Allison M. Lewis, Todd C. LaJeunesse & Sieuwkje F. Steenhuizen
Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium associate with a broad array of metazoan and protistian hosts. Symbiodinium-based symbioses involving bioeroding sponge hosts have received less attention than those involving scleractinian hosts. Certain species of common Cliona harbor high densities of an ecologically restricted group of Symbiodinium, referred to as Clade G. The relationships of these unusual Clade G Symbiodinium with Foraminifera, sponges, and black coral (Antipatharia) are rarely studied. Nonetheless, analyses of genetic evidence indicate that...

Data from: Plastic waste associated with disease on coral reefs

Joleah B. Lamb, Bette L. Willis, Evan A. Fiorenza, Courtney S. Couch, Robert Howard, Douglas N. Rader, James D. True, Lisa A. Kelly, Awaludinnoer Ahmad, Jamaluddin Jompa & C. Drew Harvell
Plastic waste can promote microbial colonization by pathogens implicated in outbreaks of disease in the ocean. We assessed the influence of plastic waste on disease risk in 124,000 reef-building corals from 159 reefs in the Asia-Pacific region. The likelihood of disease increases from 4% to 89% when corals are in contact with plastic. Structurally complex corals are eight times more likely to be affected by plastic, suggesting that microhabitats for reef-associated organisms and valuable fisheries...

Data from: Idiosyncratic responses to climate-driven forest fragmentation and marine incursions in reed frogs from Central Africa and the Gulf of Guinea Islands

Rayna C. Bell, Juan L. Parra, Gabriel Badjedjea, Michael F. Barej, David C. Blackburn, Marius Burger, Alan Channing, J. Maximilian Dehling, Eli Greenbaum, Václav Gvoždík, Jos Kielgast, Chifundera Kusamba, Stefan Lötters, Patrick J. McLaughlin, Zoltán T. Nagy, Mark-Oliver Rödel, Daniel M. Portik, Bryan L. Stuart, Jeremy VanDerWal, Ange-Ghislain Zassi Boulou & Kelly R. Zamudio
Organismal traits interact with environmental variation to mediate how species respond to shared landscapes. Thus, differences in traits related to dispersal ability or physiological tolerance may result in phylogeographic discordance among co-distributed taxa, even when they are responding to common barriers. We quantified climatic suitability and stability, and phylogeographic divergence within three reed frog species complexes across the Guineo-Congolian forests and Gulf of Guinea archipelago of Central Africa to investigate how they responded to a...

Data from: The role of topography and plant functional traits in determining tropical reforestation success

Alexander W. Cheesman, Noel D. Preece, Penny Van Oosterzee, Peter D. Erskine & Lucas A. Cernusak
1.Early establishment and sapling growth is a key phase in ensuring cost-effective reforestation success in relation to biodiversity outcomes. Therefore species selection must consider the interaction between plant functional traits and the often-challenging and heterogeneous biophysical environment of degraded landscapes. 2.In this study, we examine how microtopography (slope) results in spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients, especially phosphorus (P) in a degraded tropical pasture landscape in Queensland, Australia. We then explore how this small-scale heterogeneity influences...

Data from: Disentangling the pathways of land use impacts on the functional structure of fish assemblages in Amazon streams

Rafael P. Leitão, Jansen Zuanon, David Mouillot, Cecília G. Leal, Robert M. Hughes, Philip R. Kaufmann, Sébastien Villéger, Paulo S. Pompeu, Daniele Kasper, Felipe R. De Paula, Silvio F. B. Ferraz & Toby A. Gardner
Agricultural land use is a primary driver of environmental impacts on streams. However, the causal processes that shape these impacts operate through multiple pathways and at several spatial scales. This complexity undermines the development of more effective management approaches, and illustrates the need for more in-depth studies to assess the mechanisms that determine changes in stream biodiversity. Here we present results of the most comprehensive multi-scale assessment of the biological condition of streams in the...

Data from: Kin recognition in embryonic damselfishes

Jennifer Ann Atherton & Mark Ian McCormick
Predator-induced mortality rates are highest in early life stages; therefore, early recognition of threats can greatly increase survival chances. Some species of coral reef fishes have been frequently found to recruit back to their natal reefs; in this instance, there is a high chance of juveniles encountering their siblings, among other kin, after hatching. Kin recognition plays an important ecological role in that it allows individuals to protect genetically similar relatives, and hence increase their...

Data from: Warming has a greater effect than elevated CO2 on predator–prey interactions in coral reef fish

Bridie J.M. Allan, Paolo Domenici, Sue Ann Watson, Philip L. Munday, Mark I. McCormick & Bridie J. M. Allan
Ocean acidification and warming, driven by anthropogenic CO2 emissions, are considered to be among the greatest threats facing marine organisms. While each stressor in isolation has been studied extensively, there has been less focus on their combined effects, which could impact key ecological processes. We tested the independent and combined effects of short-term exposure to elevated CO2 and temperature on the predator–prey interactions of a common pair of coral reef fishes (Pomacentrus wardi and its...

Data from: Low recruitment due to altered settlement substrata as primary constraint for coral communities under ocean acidification

Katharina E. Fabricius, Sam H.C. Noonan, David Abrego, Lindsay Harrington, Glenn De'ath & Sam H. C. Noonan
The future of coral reefs under increasing CO2 depends on their capacity to recover from disturbances. To predict the recovery potential of coral communities that are fully acclimatized to elevated CO2, we compared the relative success of coral recruitment and later life stages at two volcanic CO2 seeps and adjacent control sites in Papua New Guinea. Our field experiments showed that the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coral recruitment rates were up to an...

Data from: Filters of floristic exchange: how traits and climate shape the rainforest invasion of Sahul from Sunda

Jia-Yee S. Yap, Maurizio Rossetto, Craig Costion, Darren Crayn, Robert M. Kooyman, James Richardson & Robert Henry
Aim To evaluate how biogeographic and ecological processes influenced species distributions and community assembly in a continental rainforest flora with mixed biogeographic origins. Location Continental Australia. Methods We identified 795 species with Sahul ancestry (Australian rainforest flora of Gondwanan origin) and 604 species with Sunda ancestry (rainforest plant lineages of Indo-Malesian origin) from a total of 1872 free-standing Australian woody rainforest taxa. We then compared the distribution of Sunda to Sahul species in relation to...

Data from: Regime shifts shorten food chains for mesopredators with potential sublethal effects

Tessa N. Hempson, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Aaron M. MacNeil, Nathalie Bodin, Shaun K. Wilson & Nicholas A. J. Graham
1. Predator populations are in decline globally. Exploitation, as well as habitat degradation and associated changes in prey availability are key drivers of this process of trophic downgrading. In the short term, longevity and dietary adaptability of large-bodied consumers can mask potential sub-lethal effects of a changing prey base, producing a delayed effect that may be difficult to detect. 2. In coral reef ecosystems, regime shifts from coral- to algae-dominated states caused by coral bleaching...

Data from: Temperate marine protected area provides recruitment subsidies to local fisheries

Agnes Le Port, John C. Montgomery, Adam N.H. Smith, Adrian E. Croucher, Ian M. McLeod, Shane D. Lavery & A. N. H. Smith
The utility of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a means of protecting exploited species and conserving biodiversity within MPA boundaries is supported by strong empirical evidence. However, the potential contribution of MPAs to fished populations beyond their boundaries is still highly controversial; empirical measures are scarce and modelling studies have produced a range of predictions, including both positive and negative effects. Using a combination of genetic parentage and relatedness analysis, we measured larval subsidies to...

Data from: Genetic structure and signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos)

Paolo Momigliano, Robert Harcourt, William D. Robbins, Vanessa Jaiteh, Gusti N. Mahardika, Andriuanus Sembiring & Adam Stow
With overfishing reducing the abundance of marine predators in multiple marine ecosystems, knowledge of genomic structure and local adaptation may provide valuable information to assist sustainable management. Despite recent technological advances, most studies on sharks have used small sets of neutral markers to describe their genetic structure. We used 5517 nuclear SNPs and a mtDNA gene to characterize patterns of genetic structure and detect signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). Using samples...

Data from: Managing seagrass resilience under cumulative dredging affecting light: predicting risk using dynamic Bayesian networks

Paul Pao-Yen Wu, Kathryn McMahon, Michael A. Rasheed, Gary A. Kendrick, Paul H. York, Kathryn Chartrand, M. Julian Caley & Kerrie Mengersen
Coastal development is contributing to ongoing declines of ecosystems globally. Consequently, understanding the risks posed to these systems, and how they respond to successive disturbances, is paramount for their improved management. We study the cumulative impacts of maintenance dredging on seagrass ecosystems as a canonical example. Maintenance dredging causes disturbances lasting weeks to months, often repeated at yearly intervals. We present a risk-based modelling framework for time varying complex systems centred around a dynamic Bayesian...

Data from: Temporal genetic patterns of diversity and structure evidence sweepstakes in reproductive success of a spiny lobster

Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Carla A. Souza, Nicholas P. Murphy, Bridget S. Green, Caleb Gardner & Jan M. Strugnell
Population structure of many marine organisms is spatially patchy and varies within and between years, a phenomenon defined as chaotic genetic patchiness. This results from the combination of planktonic larval dispersal and environmental stochasticity. Additionally, in species with bi-partite life, post-settlement selection can magnify these genetic differences. The high fecundity (up to 500,000 eggs annually) and protracted larval duration (12-24 months) and dispersal of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, make it a good test...

Data from: Demographic collapse and low genetic diversity of the Irrawaddy dolphin population inhabiting the Mekong River

Michael Krützen, Isabel Beasley, Corinne Y. Ackermann, Dietmar Lieckfeldt, Arne Ludwig, Gerard E. Ryan, Lars Bejder, Guido J. Parra, Rebekka Wolfensberger & Peter B. S. Spencer
In threatened wildlife populations, it is important to determine whether observed low genetic diversity may be due to recent anthropogenic pressure or the consequence of historic events. Historical size of the Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) population inhabiting the Mekong River is unknown and there is significant concern for long-term survival of the remaining population as a result of low abundance, slow reproduction rate, high neonatal mortality, and continuing anthropogenic threats. We investigated population structure and...

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Data from: Temporal and spatial activity-associated energy partitioning in free-swimming sea snakes

Vinay Udyawer, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Michelle R. Heupel & Timothy D. Clark
1. Partitioning energy between critical basal functions and activity-associated behaviours is a primary determinant of animal survival. Consequently, habitat selection is likely to be driven by the efficiency with which resources can be acquired from a heterogeneous energy landscape. 2. Determining how energy partitioning is achieved across temporal and spatial scales is particularly challenging in aquatic animals due to the logistical limitations in estimating field metabolic rates (FMR) while simultaneously examining habitat choice. 3. Here,...

Data from: Strong trans-Pacific break and local conservation units in the Galapagos shark (Carcharhinus galapagensis) revealed by genome-wide cytonuclear markers

Diana A. Pazmiño, Gregory E. Maes, Madeline E. Green, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Mauricio Hoyos-Padilla, Clinton J.A. Duffy, Carl G. Meyer, Sven E. Kerwath, Pelayo Salinas-De-León & Lynne Van Herwerden
The application of genome-wide cytonuclear molecular data to identify management and adaptive units at various spatio-temporal levels is particularly important for overharvested large predatory organisms, often characterized by smaller, localized populations. Despite being “near threatened”, current understanding of habitat use and population structure of Carcharhinus galapagensis is limited to specific areas within its distribution. We evaluated population structure and connectivity across the Pacific Ocean using genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (~7200 SNPs) and mitochondrial Control Region...

Data from: High intra-ocean, but limited inter-ocean genetic connectivity in populations of the deep-water oblique-banded snapper Pristipomoides zonatus (Pisces: Lutjanidae)

W. Jason Kennington, Peter W. Keron, Euan S. Harvey, Corey B. Wakefield, Ashley J. Williams, Tuikolongahau Halafihi & Stephen J. Newman
While many studies have investigated connectivity and subdivision in marine fish occupying tropical, shallow water reef habitats, relatively few have been conducted on commercially important deep-water species in the Indo-Pacific region. Here, we examine spatial and temporal genetic variation in the deep-water oblique-banded snapper Pristipomoides zonatus, collected from eight locations across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. A total of 292 individuals were screened for genetic variation at six nuclear microsatellite loci and the cytochrome c...

Data from: Functional genomic analysis of corals from natural CO2-seeps reveals core molecular responses involved in acclimatization to ocean acidification

Carly D. Kenkel, Aurelie Moya, Julia Strahl, Craig Humphrey & Line K. Bay
Little is known about the potential for acclimatization or adaptation of corals to ocean acidification and even less about the molecular mechanisms underpinning these processes. Here we examine global gene expression patterns in corals and their intracellular algal symbionts from two replicate population pairs in Papua New Guinea that have undergone long-term acclimatization to natural variation in pCO2. In the coral host, only 61 genes were differentially expressed in response to pCO2 environment, but the...

Data from: Seagrass ecosystems reduce exposure to bacterial pathogens of humans, fishes and invertebrates

Joleah B. Lamb, Jeroen A. J. M. Van De Water, David G. Bourne, Craig Altier, Margaux Y. Hein, Evan A. Fiorenza, Nur Abu, Jamaluddin Jompa & C. Drew Harvell
Plants are important in urban environments for removing pathogens and improving water quality. Seagrass meadows are the most widespread coastal ecosystem on the planet. Although these plants are known to be associated with natural biocide production, they have not been evaluated for their ability to remove microbiological contamination. Using amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we found that when seagrass meadows are present, there was a 50% reduction in the relative abundance of...

Data from: Strong population structure deduced from genetics, otolith chemistry and parasite abundances explains vulnerability to localised fishery collapse in a large Sciaenid fish, Protonibea diacanthus

Laura Taillebois, Diane P. Barton, David A. Crook, Thor Saunders, Jonathan Taylor, Mark Hearnden, Richard J. Saunders, Stephen J. Newman, Michael J. Travers, David J. Welch, Alan Greig, Christine Dudgeon, Safia Maher & Jennifer R. Ovenden
As pressure on coastal marine resources is increasing globally, the need to quantitatively assess vulnerable fish stocks is crucial in order to avoid the ecological consequences of stock depletions. Species of Sciaenidae (croakers, drums) are important components of tropical and temperate fisheries and are especially vulnerable to exploitation. The black-spotted croaker, Protonibea diacanthus, is the only large sciaenid in coastal waters of northern Australia where it is targeted by commercial, recreational and indigenous fishers due...

Data from: Responses of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity related genes to elevated CO2 levels in the brain of three teleost species

Floriana Lai, Cathrine E. Fagernes, Nicholas J. Bernier, Gabrielle M. Miller, Philip L. Munday, Fredrik Jutfelt & Göran E. Nilsson
The continuous increase of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting in ocean acidification has been reported to affect brain function in some fishes. During adulthood, cell proliferation is fundamental for fish brain growth and for it to adapt in response to external stimuli, such as environmental changes. Here we report the first expression study of genes regulating neurogenesis and neuroplasticity in brains of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), cinnamon anemonefish (Amphiprion melanopus) and spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis...

Data from: Influence of the geography of speciation on current patterns of coral reef fish biodiversity across the Indo-Pacific

Théo Gaboriau, Fabien Leprieur, David Mouillot & Nicolas Hubert
The role of speciation processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns represents a major scientific question for ecologists and biogeographers. Hence, numerous methods have been developed to determine the geography of speciation based on co-occurrence between sister-species. Most of these methods rely on the correlation between divergence time and several metrics based on the geographic ranges of sister-taxa (i.e. overlap, asymmetry). The relationship between divergence time and these metrics has scarcely been examined in a spatial...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    46

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    46

Affiliations

  • James Cook University
    46
  • Australian Institute of Marine Science
    6
  • University of Queensland
    4
  • University of Western Australia
    4
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • University of Tasmania
    3
  • Hasanuddin University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • Murdoch University
    2