6 Works

Data from: Arboreal camera trapping: taking a proven method to new heights

Tremaine Gregory, Farah Carrasco Rueda, Jessica Deichmann, Joseph Kolowski & Alfonso Alonso
1. Although camera trapping has been shown to be a highly effective non-invasive tool for wildlife monitoring, the technique has not yet been widely applied to studies of arboreal species. Despite the unique challenges that camera trapping in the canopy poses, its versatility and relatively non-invasive nature, combined with recent technological improvements on the cameras themselves, make camera trapping a highly useful tool for arboreal research. 2. We present data on the methodology and effectiveness...

Data from: Partitioning the sources of demographic variation reveals density-dependent nest predation in an island bird population

Helen R. Sofaer, T Sillett, Kathryn M. Langin, Scott A. Morrison, Cameron K. Ghalambor & T. Scott Sillett
Ecological factors often shape demography through multiple mechanisms, making it difficult to identify the sources of demographic variation. In particular, conspecific density can influence both the strength of competition and the predation rate, but density-dependent competition has received more attention, particularly among terrestrial vertebrates and in island populations. A better understanding of how both competition and predation contribute to density-dependent variation in fecundity can be gained by partitioning the effects of density on offspring number...

Data from: Detecting slow introgression of invasive alleles in an extensively restocked game bird

Ines Sanchez-Donoso, Jisca Huisman, Jorge Echegaray, Manel Puigcerver, José Domingo Rodríguez-Teijeiro, Frank Hailer & Carles Vilà
Interbreeding of two species in the wild implies introgression of alleles from one species into the other only when admixed individuals survive and successfully backcross with the parental species. Consequently, estimating the proportion of first generation hybrids in a population may not inform about the evolutionary impact of hybridization. Samples obtained over a long time span may offer a more accurate view of the spreading of introgressed alleles in a species’ gene pool. Common quail...

Data from: Winter food limits timing of pre-alternate molt in a short-distance migratory bird

Raymond M. Danner, Russell S. Greenberg, Julie E. Danner & Jeffrey R. Walters
1. Molt is critical for fitness for many organisms for several reasons: it allows growth and maintains the function of the integument for protection, thermoregulation and communication. 2. Feather molt in birds is costly and therefore typically does not overlap with migration or reproduction. In spring, the rapid succession of pre-alternate molt, migration (if a migrant), and breeding suggests that timing of molt could constrain the initiation of breeding. A tradeoff between time spent molting...

Data from: Prioritizing tiger conservation through landscape genetics and habitat linkages

Bibek Yumnam, Yadvendradev V. Jhala, Qamar Qureshi, Jesus E. Maldonado, Rajesh Gopal, Swati Saini, Y. Srinivas & Robert C. Fleischer
Even with global support for tiger (Panthera tigris) conservation their survival is threatened by poaching, habitat loss and isolation. Currently about 3,000 wild tigers persist in small fragmented populations within seven percent of their historic range. Identifying and securing habitat linkages that connect source populations for maintaining landscape-level gene flow is an important long-term conservation strategy for endangered carnivores. However, habitat corridors that link regional tiger populations are often lost to development projects due to...

Data from: Maintenance of genetic diversity in an introduced island population of Guanacos after seven decades and two severe demographic bottlenecks: implications for camelid conservation

Benito A. González, Pablo Orozco-TerWengel, Rainer Von Borries, Warren E. Johnson, William L. Franklin & Juan C. Marín
Fifteen Guanacos were introduced to Staats Island in Falklands/Malvinas archipelago from Patagonia in the 1930s. After introduction, the Guanaco population increased to almost 400 animals that retained a footprint of the founding effect and bottleneck reflected in the genetic status of this isolated population. The goals of this study were to (i) make a genetic assessment of this island population through comparisons with mainland populations and simulation, and (ii) assess the likely source population of...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
    6
  • Smithsonian Institution
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1
  • Spanish National Research Council
    1
  • Virginia Tech
    1
  • University of Florida
    1
  • Colorado State University
    1
  • Cardiff University
    1
  • University of Chile
    1