25 Works

Hampshire Avon: soil temperature and water content data from three sub-catchments

J. E. Stockdale & P. Ineson
The dataset contains measurements of soil temperature and volumetric water content from plots in agricultural grasslands in the Hampshire Avon catchment (UK) from late-2013 to September 2015. Manipulations of soil temperature were made at three orthogonal experiments in three sub-catchments of contrasting geology (chalk, clay and greensand) between May and September 2015.

Data from: A new model for ancient DNA decay based on paleogenomic meta-analysis

Logan Kistler, Roselyn Ware, Oliver Smith, Matthew Collins & Robin G. Allaby
The persistence of DNA over archaeological and paleontological timescales in diverse environments has led to a revolutionary body of paleogenomic research, yet the dynamics of DNA degradation are still poorly understood. We analyzed 185 paleogenomic datasets and compared DNA survival with environmental variables and sample ages. We find cytosine deamination follows a conventional thermal age model, but we find no correlation between DNA fragmentation and sample age over the timespans analyzed, even when controlling for...

Data from: An experimental study of the putative mechanism of a synthetic autonomous rotary DNA nanomotor

Katherine E. Dunn, Mark C. Leake, Adam J. M. Wollman, Martin A. Trefzer, Steven Johnson & Andy M. Tyrrell
DNA has been used to construct a wide variety of nanoscale molecular devices. Inspiration for such synthetic molecular machines is frequently drawn from protein motors, which are naturally occurring and ubiquitous. However, despite the fact that rotary motors such as ATP synthase and the bacterial flagellar motor play extremely important roles in nature, very few rotary devices have been constructed using DNA. This paper describes an experimental study of the putative mechanism of a rotary...

Data from: Still armed after domestication? Impact of domestication and agronomic selection on silicon defences in cereals

Kimberley J. Simpson, Ruth N. Wade, Mark Rees, Colin P. Osborne & Sue E. Hartley
1. Plant phenotypes reflect trade-offs between competing resource-intensive physiological processes. A shift in resource allocation, away from anti-herbivore defences and towards growth and reproduction, is predicted through plant domestication, such that crops are faster growing and higher yielding than their wild ancestors. These changes are hypothesized to have come at the cost of defence investment, leaving crops ‘disarmed by domestication’. Silicon is the principal anti-herbivore defence in grasses, including many of our most important staple...

Data from: Protein-mediated RNA folding governs sequence-specific interactions between rotavirus genome segments

Alexander Borodavka, Eric C. Dykeman, Waldemar Schrimpf & Don C. Lamb
Segmented RNA viruses are ubiquitous pathogens, which include influenza viruses and rotaviruses. A major challenge in understanding their assembly is the combinatorial problem of a non-random selection of a full genomic set of distinct RNAs. This process involves complex RNA-RNA and protein-RNA interactions, which are often obscured by non-specific binding at concentrations approaching in vivo assembly conditions. Here, we present direct experimental evidence of sequence-specific inter-segment interactions between rotavirus RNAs, taking place in a complex...

Data from: Mortality risk and social network position in resident killer whales: sex differences and the importance of resource abundance

Samuel Ellis, Daniel W. Franks, Stuart Nattrass, Michael A. Cant, M. N. Weiss, Deborah Giles, Kenneth C. Balcomb & Darren P. Croft
An individual’s ecological environment affects their mortality risk, which in turn has fundamental consequences for life history evolution. In many species social relationships are likely to be an important component of an individual’s environment, and therefore their mortality risk. Here we examine the relationship between social position and mortality risk in resident killer whales (Orcinus orca) using over three decades of social and demographic data. We find that the social position of male, but not...

Data from: Impacts of silicon-based grass defences across trophic levels under both current and future atmospheric CO2 scenarios

James M.W. Ryalls, Sue E. Hartley, Scott N. Johnson, James M. W. Ryalls & Susan E. Hartley
Silicon (Si) has important functional roles in plants, including resistance against herbivores. Environmental change, such as increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2, may alter allocation to Si defences in grasses, potentially changing the feeding behaviour and performance of herbivores, which may in turn impact on higher trophic groups. Using Si-treated and untreated grasses (Phalaris aquatica) maintained under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (640 and 800 ppm) CO2 concentrations, we show that Si reduced feeding by crickets...

Data from: Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

David Oriola, Hermes Gadêlha & Jaume Casademunt
The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive cross-linkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been...

Data from: A pantropical analysis of the impacts of forest degradation and conversion on local temperature

Rebecca A. Senior, Jane K. Hill, Pamela González Del Pliego, Laurel K. Goode & David P. Edwards
Temperature is a core component of a species’ fundamental niche. At the fine scale over which most organisms experience climate (mm to ha), temperature depends upon the amount of radiation reaching the Earth’s surface, which is principally governed by vegetation. Tropical regions have undergone widespread and extreme changes to vegetation, particularly through the degradation and conversion of rainforests. Since most terrestrial biodiversity is in the tropics, and many of these species possess narrow thermal limits,...

Data from: Silicon-induced root nodulation and synthesis of essential amino acids in a legume is associated with higher herbivore abundance

Scott N. Johnson, Susan E. Hartley, James M.W. Ryalls, Adam Frew, Jane L. DeGabriel, Michael Duncan, Andrew N. Gherlenda & James M. W. Ryalls
Ecologists have become increasingly aware that silicon uptake by plants, especially the Poaceae, can have beneficial effects on both plant growth and herbivore defence. The effects of silicon on other plant functional groups, such as nitrogen-fixing legumes, have been less well studied. Silicon could, however, indirectly promote herbivore performance in this group if reported increases in N2-fixation caused improvements in host plant quality for herbivores. We tested how silicon supplementation in the legume Medico sativa...

Data from: Circadian rhythms vary over the growing season and correlate with fitness components

Matthew J. Rubin, Marcus T. Brock, Amanda M. Davis, Zachary M. German, Mary Knapp, Stephen M. Welch, Stacey L. Harmer, Julin N. Maloof, Seth J. Davis & Cynthia Weinig
Circadian clocks have evolved independently in all three domains of life, suggesting that internal mechanisms of time-keeping are adaptive in contemporary populations. However, the performance consequences of either discrete or quantitative clock variation have rarely been tested in field settings. Clock sensitivity of diverse segregating lines to the environment remains uncharacterized as do the statistical genetic parameters that determine evolutionary potential. In field studies with Arabidopsis thaliana, we found that major perturbations to circadian cycle...

Data from: The York Gospels: a 1000-year biological palimpsest

Matthew D. Teasdale, Sarah Fiddyment, Jiří Vnouček, Valeria Mattiangeli, Camilla Speller, Annelise Binois, Martin Carver, Catherine Dand, Timothy P. Newfield, Christopher C. Webb, Daniel G. Bradley & Matthew J. Collins
Medieval manuscripts, carefully curated and conserved, represent not only an irreplaceable documentary record but also a remarkable reservoir of biological information. Palaeographic and codicological investigation can often locate and date these documents with remarkable precision. The York Gospels (York Minster Ms. Add. 1) is one such codex, one of only a small collection of pre-conquest Gospel books to have survived the Reformation. By extending the non-invasive triboelectric (eraser-based) sampling technique eZooMS, to include the analysis...

Hampshire Avon: trace gas fluxes from experimentally manipulated plots in three sub-catchments

J. E. Stockdale & P. Ineson
The dataset contains instantaneous fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from intact lysimeters in agricultural grasslands in the Hampshire Avon catchment (UK). Manipulations of soil temperature, soil water saturation, additions of nitrogen, phosphorus and of nitrogen and phosphorus were made at three orthogonal experiments in three sub-catchments of contrasting geology (chalk, clay and greensand). Fluxes of carbon dioxide were directly measured continuously during 2014 and 2015 using automated chamber approach, and fluxes of...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Data from: High virulence sub-populations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa long-term cystic fibrosis airway infections

Siobhan O'Brien, David Williams, Joanne L. Fothergill, Steve Paterson, Winstanley Craig & Michael A. Brockhurst
Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa typically displays loss of virulence-associated secretions over the course of chronic cystic fibrosis infections. This has led to the suggestion that virulence is a costly attribute in chronic infections. However, previous reports suggest that overproducing (OP) virulent pathotypes can coexist with non-producing mutants in the CF lung for many years. The consequences of such within-patient phenotypic diversity for the success of this pathogen are not fully understood. Here, we provide in-depth quantification...

Data from: Function and flexibility of object exploration in kea and New Caledonian crows

Megan L. Lambert, Martina Schiestl, Raoul Schwing, Alex H. Taylor, Gyula K. Gajdon, Katie E. Slocombe & Amanda M. Seed
A range of nonhuman animals frequently manipulate and explore objects in their environment, which may enable them to learn about physical properties and potentially form more abstract concepts of properties such as weight and rigidity. Whether animals can apply the information learned during their exploration to solve novel problems, however, and whether they actually change their exploratory behaviour to seek functional information about objects have not been fully explored. We allowed kea (Nestor notabilis) and...

Data from: Do glucocorticoids predict fitness? Linking environmental conditions, corticosterone and reproductive success in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus

Lindsay J. Henderson, Neil P. Evans, Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn & Kathryn E. Arnold
Glucocorticoids, including corticosterone (CORT), have been suggested to provide a physiological link between ecological conditions and fitness. Specifically, CORT, which is elevated in response to harsh conditions, is predicted to be correlated with reduced fitness. Yet, empirical studies show that CORT can be non-significantly, positively and negatively linked with fitness. Divergent environmental conditions between years or study systems may influence whether CORT is linked to fitness. To test this, we monitored free-living blue tits (Cyanistes...

Data from: Chimpanzee intellect: personality, performance and motivation with touchscreen tasks

Drew M. Altschul, Emma K. Wallace, Ruth Sonnweber, Masaki Tomonaga, Alex Weiss & Alexander Weiss
Human intellect is characterized by intercorrelated psychological domains, including intelligence, academic performance and personality. Higher openness is associated with higher intelligence and better academic performance, yet high performance among individuals is itself attributable to intelligence, not openness. High conscientiousness individuals, although not necessarily more intelligent, are better performers. Work with other species is not as extensive, yet animals display similar relationships between exploration- and persistence-related personality traits and performance on cognitive tasks. However, previous studies...

Dataset and source code, FPL 2015

Nizar Dahir
Data sets and source code used to generate data for the paper

Soil respiration under Miscanthus x giganteus and an adjacent barley crop

B. Keane & P. Ineson
Data collected during a field experiment investigating the differences between greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes under a bioenergy crop Miscanthus x giganteus and a conventional arable crop, barley (Hordeum vulgare) on adjacent fields. Measurements taken include soil respiration (Rs) measured using Licor automated chambers and infrared gas analyser (IRGA), from collars excluding aboveground vegetation but not roots. Ancillary measurements included meteorological variables (air temperature and solar radiation) and soil variables (soil moisture and temperature at 5...

Data from: Heat stress affects facultative symbiont-mediated protection from a parasitoid wasp

Eleanor R. Heyworth & Julia Ferrari
Many insects carry facultative bacterial symbionts, which provide benefits including resistance to natural enemies and abiotic stresses. Little is known about how these beneficial phenotypes are affected when biotic or abiotic threats occur simultaneously. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) can host several well-characterized symbiont species. The symbiont known as X-type can protect against both parasitoid wasps and heat stress. Here, we used three pea aphid genotypes that were naturally infected with X-type and the symbiont...

Data from: Can collective memories shape fish distributions? A test, linking space-time occurrence models and population demographics

Jed I. Macdonald, Kai Logemann, Elias T. Krainski, Þorsteinn Sigurðsson, Colin M. Beale, Geir Huse, Solfrid S. Hjøllo & Guðrún Marteinsdóttir
Social learning can be fundamental to cohesive group living, and schooling fishes have proven ideal test subjects for recent work in this field. For many species, both demographic factors, and inter- (and intra-) generational information exchange are considered vital ingredients in how movement decisions are reached. Yet key information is often missing on the spatial outcomes of such decisions, and questions concerning how migratory traditions are influenced by collective memory, density-dependent and density-independent processes remain...

Data from: Seasonal variation in the biocontrol efficiency of bacterial wilt is driven by temperature-mediated changes in bacterial competitive interactions

Zhong Wei, Jianfeng Huang, Tianjie Yang, Alexandre Jousset, Yangchun Xu, Qirong Shen, Ville-Petr Friman & Ville-Petri Friman
1. Microbe-based biocontrol applications hold the potential to become an efficient way to control plant pathogen disease outbreaks in the future. However, their efficiency is still very variable, which could be due to their sensitivity to the abiotic environmental conditions. 2. Here we assessed how environmental temperature variation correlates with the Ralstonia pickettii, an endophytic bacterial biocontrol agent, ability to suppress Ralstonia solanacearum pathogen during different tomato crop seasons in China. 3. We found that...

Data from: Continent-level drivers of African pyrodiversity

Gareth P. Hempson, Catherine L. Parr, Sally Archibald, T. Michael Anderson, Colin J. Courtney Mustaphi, Andrew P. Dobson, Jason E. Donaldson, Thomas A. Morrison, James Probert & Colin M. Beale
Pyrodiversity, which describes fire variability over space and time, is believed to increase habitat heterogeneity and thereby promote biodiversity. However, to date there is no standardised metric for quantifying pyrodiversity, and so broad geographic patterns and drivers of pyrodiversity remain unexplored. We present the first generalizable method to quantify pyrodiversity, and use it to address the fundamental questions of what drives pyrodiversity, which fire attributes constrain pyrodiversity under different conditions, and whether pyrodiversity is spatial...

Data from: Impact of predicted precipitation scenarios on multitrophic interactions

Ruth N. Wade, Alison J. Karley, Scott N. Johnson & Sue E. Hartley
1. Predicted changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme rainfall events in the UK have the potential to disrupt terrestrial ecosystem function. However, responses of different trophic levels to these changes in rainfall patterns, and the underlying mechanisms, are not well characterised. 2. This study aimed to investigate how changes in both the quantity and frequency of rainfall events will affect the outcome of interactions between plants, insect herbivores (above- and below- ground) and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    25

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    25

Affiliations

  • University of York
    25
  • Western Sydney University
    3
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • University of Vienna
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Center for NanoScience
    1
  • National Museum
    1
  • Rice University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • Princeton University
    1