43 Works

Data from: Larval pheromones act as colony-wide regulators of collective foraging behavior in honeybees

Rong Ma, Gabriel Villar, Christina M. Grozinger & Juliana Rangel
When animals move or forage in groups, collective behaviors arise from independent decisions that individuals make based on limited information about the environment. In decentralized systems in which individuals use local cues to decide how to allocate their time amongst multiple tasks, a “global” signal detectable over large distances by all members of the group could have a profound effect on task allocation and coordination. Honey bees provide a unique opportunity to study how information...

Data from: New species of closely related endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the Greater Caribbean have niches corresponding to host coral phylogeny

Allison M. Lewis, Andrea N. Chan & Todd C. LaJeunesse
Symbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Breviolum (formerly Symbiodinium Clade B) dominate coral communities in shallow waters across the Greater Caribbean. While some formally described species exist, mounting genetic, and ecological evidence indicate that numerous more comprise this genus, many of which are closely related. To test this, colonies of common reef‐building corals were sampled across a large geographical range. Phylogenetic and population genetic markers then used to examine evolutionary divergence and delineate boundaries of genetic...

Data from: Diet complementation as a frequency‐dependent mechanism conferring advantages to rare plants via dispersal

Teresa Morán López, Tomas A. Carlo, Guillermo Amico & Juan Manuel Morales
1. We used an agent-based model to test the hypothesis that diet complementation by frugivores can promote the persistence of rare plant species in communities (DCH). 2. Models simulated bird movement, frugivory, seed-dispersal, and plant recruitment on landscapes that differed in their degree of fragmentation and in their degree of fruiting species mixing at the scale of frugivores’ foraging decisions. 3. Diet complementation promoted the dispersal of rare-species without the need of a priori preference...

Data from: Ecological correlates of the spatial co-occurrence of sympatric mammalian carnivores worldwide

Courtney L. Davis, Lindsey N. Rich, Zach J. Farris, Marcella J. Kelly, Mario S. Di Bitetti, Yamil Di Blanco, Sebastian Albanesi, Mohammad S. Farhadinia, Navid Gholikhani, Sandra Hamel, Bart J. Harmsen, Claudia Wultsch, Mamadou D. Kane, Quinton Martins, Asia J. Murphy, Robin Steenweg, S. Sunarto, Atieh Taktehrani, Kanchan Thapa, Jody M. Tucker, Jesse Whittington, Febri A. Widodo, Nigel G. Yoccoz & David A.W. Miller
The composition of local mammalian carnivore communities has far-reaching effects on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. To better understand how carnivore communities are structured, we analyzed camera trap data for 108,087 trap days across 12 countries spanning 5 continents. We estimate local probabilities of co-occurrence among 768 species pairs from the order Carnivora and evaluate how shared ecological traits correlated with probabilities of co-occurrence. Within individual study areas, species pairs co-occurred more frequently than expected at random....

Data from: How does avian seed dispersal shape the structure of early successional tropical forests?

Aarón González-Castro, Suann Yang & Tomás A. Carlo
1. Frugivores shape plant communities via seed dispersal of fleshy-fruited plant species. However, the structural characteristics that frugivores impart to plant communities are little understood. Evaluating how frugivores structure plant communities via the non-proportional use of available fruit resources is critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems where fleshy-fruited plant species are dominant, such as tropical forests. 2. We performed a seed-addition field experiment to investigate how frugivorous birds shape the composition and richness of...

Data from: Limited hatchery introgression into wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations despite reoccurring stocking

Shannon L. White, William L. Miller, Stephanie A. Dowell, Meredith L. Bartron & Tyler Wagner
Due to increased anthropogenic pressures on many fish populations, supplementing wild populations with captive-raised individuals has become an increasingly common management practice. Stocking programs can be controversial due to uncertainty about the long-term fitness effects of genetic introgression on wild populations. In particular, introgression between hatchery and wild individuals can cause declines in wild population fitness, resiliency, and adaptive potential, and contribute to local population extirpation. However, low survival and fitness of captive-raised individuals can...

Data from: Fine-scale spatial homogenization of microbial habitats: a multivariate index of headwater wetland complex condition

Jessica B. Moon, Denice H. Wardrop, Erica A.H. Smithwick, Kusum J. Naithani & Erica A. H. Smithwick
With growing public awareness that wetlands are important to society, there are intensifying efforts to understand the ecological condition of those wetlands that remain, and to develop indicators of wetland condition. Indicators based on soils are not well developed and are absent in some current assessment protocols; these could be advantageous, particularly for soils, which are complex habitats for plants, invertebrates, and microbial communities. In this study, we examine whether multivariate soil indicators, correlated with...

Data from: Collective behavior and colony persistence of social spiders depends on their physical environment

Ambika Kamath, Skylar D. Primavera, Colin M. Wright, Grant N. Doering, Kirsten A. Sheehy, Noa Pinter-Wollman & Jonathan N. Pruitt
The physical environment occupied by group-living animals can profoundly affect their cooperative social interactions and therefore their collective behavior and success. These effects can be especially apparent in human-modified habitats, which often harbor substantial variation in the physical environments available within them. For nest-building animal societies, this influence of the physical environment on collective behavior can be mediated by the construction of nests—nests could either buffer animal behavior from changes in the physical environment or...

Data from: Fat in the leg: function of the expanded hind leg in gasteruptiid wasps (Hymenoptera: Gasteruptiidae)

István Mikó, Sarthok Rasique Rahman, Salvatore S. Anzaldo, Thomas Van De Kamp, Ben A. Parslow, Nikolai J. Tatarnic, Maxwell T. Wetherington, Julie Anderson, Rudolf J. Schilder, Jonah M. Ulmer, Andrew R. Deans & Heather M. Hines
Among some of the most unusual traits of the gasteruptiid wasps is their unique hovering flight and the expansion of their hind tibiae. Tibial expansions in female parasitoid hymenopterans often involve an enlarged sensory structure for vibration detection, the subgenual organ, thus enabling refined substrate-borne detection of concealed hosts. In the present paper, we utilize a combination of microscopy, chemical analysis, gene expression, and behavior to explore the function of the expanded hind tibia of...

Data from: The importance of growing up: juvenile environment influences dispersal of individuals and their neighbours

Stacy B. Endriss, Megan L. Vahsen, Ellyn V. Bitume, J. Grey Monroe, Kathryn G. Turner, Andrew P. Norton & Ruth A. Hufbauer
Dispersal is a key ecological process that is strongly influenced by both phenotype and environment. Here, we show that juvenile environment influences dispersal not only by shaping individual phenotypes, but also by changing the phenotypes of neighbouring conspecifics, which influence how individuals disperse. We used a model system (Tribolium castaneum, red flour beetles) to test how the past environment of dispersing individuals and their neighbours influences how they disperse in their current environment. We found...

Data from: Overprinting of taphonomic and paleoecological signals across the forest-prairie environmental gradient, mid-continent of North America

Lauren E. Milideo, Russell W. Graham, Carl R. Falk, Holmes A. Semken & Max L. Christie
Taphonomic factors may significantly alter faunal assemblages at varying scales. An exceptional record of late Holocene (< 4000 years old) mammal fanuas establishes a firm baseline to investigate the effects of scale on taphonomy. Our sample contains 73 sites within four contiguous states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Illinois, USA) that transect a strong modern and late Holocene environmental gradient, the prairie-forest ecotone. We performed Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS)...

Data from: Order-level fern plastome phylogenomics: new insights from Hymenophyllales

Li-Yaung Kuo, Xinping Qi, Hong Ma & Fay-Wei Li
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Filmy ferns (Hymenophyllales) are a highly specialized lineage, having mesophyll one cell layer thick and inhabiting particularly shaded and humid environments. The phylogenetic placement of Hymenophyllales has been inconclusive, and while over 87 whole fern plastomes have been published, none was from Hymenophyllales. To better understand the evolutionary history of filmy ferns, we sequenced the first complete plastome for this order. METHODS: We compiled a plastome phylogenomic dataset encompassing all eleven...

Data from: Survival and reproductive costs of repeated acute glucocorticoid elevations in a captive, wild animal

Kirsty J. MacLeod, Michael J. Sheriff, D.C.E. Ensminger, Dustin A.S. Owen, Tracy L. Langkilde, K.J. MacLeod, M.J. Sheriff, D.C. Ensminger & D.A.S. Owen
Organisms are continuously encountering both predictable and unpredictable ecological stressors within their environment. The activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (stress) axis is a fundamental process allowing animals to cope with and respond to such encounters. A main consequence of HPA axis activation is the release of glucocorticoid hormones. Although short-term glucocorticoid elevations lead to changes in physiological and behavioral processes that are often adaptive, our understanding of fitness consequences of repeated acute elevations in glucocorticoid hormones...

Data from: Development and validation of a weather-based warning system to advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot on turfgrass

Damon L. Smith, James P. Kerns, Nathan R. Walker, Andrea F. Payne, Brandon Horvath, John C. Inguagiato, John E. Kaminski, Maria Tomaso-Peterson & Paul L. Koch
Dollar spot is one of the most common diseases of golf course turfgrass and numerous fungicide applications are often required to provide adequate control. Weather-based disease warning systems have been developed to more accurately time fungicide applications; however, they tend to be ineffective and are not currently in widespread use. The primary objective of this research was to develop a new weather-based disease warning system to more accurately advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot...

Data from: Fitness costs of mating with preferred females in a scramble mating system

Lindsey Swierk & Tracy Langkilde
Little is known about the operation of male mate choice in systems with perceived high costs to male choosiness. Scramble mating systems are one type of system in which male choice is often considered too costly to be selected. However, in many scramble mating systems, there are also potentially high rewards of male choosiness, as females vary dramatically in reproductive output and males typically mate once per season and/or per lifetime. Using scramble-mating wood frogs...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Data from: Projecting the recovery of a long-lived deep-sea octocoral species after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill using structured population models

Fanny Girard, Katriona Shea & Charles R. Fisher
1. Deep-water coral communities are hotspots of diversity and biomass in the deep sea. Most deep-sea coral species are long-lived and slow-growing, and are thus expected to recover slowly after disturbance. A better understanding of the recovery potential of these organisms is necessary to make appropriate management decisions. 2. We used data from high resolution monitoring of individual coral colonies that were impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (April 2010) to parameterise and validate...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    43

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    43

Affiliations

  • Pennsylvania State University
    43
  • Emory University
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Agricultural Research Service
    2
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    2
  • Autonomous University of Yucatán
    2