21 Works

Data from: Global warming will affect the maximum potential abundance of boreal plant species

Sara Villén-Pérez, Juha Heikkinen, Maija Salemaa & Raisa Mäkipää
Forecasting the impact of future global warming on biodiversity requires understanding how temperature limits the distribution of species. Here we rely on Liebig’s Law of Minimum to estimate the effect of temperature on the maximum potential abundance that a species can attain at a certain location. We develop 95%-quantile regressions to model the influence of effective temperature sum on the maximum potential abundance of 25 common understory plant species of Finland, along 868 nationwide plots...

Fire-driven behavioral response to smoke in a Mediterranean lizard

Lola Álvarez-Ruiz, Josabel Belliure & Juli G Pausas
The evolutionary role of fire in animals has been poorly explored. Reptiles use sensory cues such as smell (chemoreception) to detect threats and flee. In Mediterranean ecosystems, fire is a threat faced by reptiles. We hypothesized that the Mediterranean lizard Psammodromus algirus recognizes the threat of fire by detecting the smoke, which triggers a behavioral response that enhances survival in fire-prone ecosystems. We predicted that lizards from fire-prone ecosystems will be more sensitive to fire...

Data from: A global meta-analysis on the ecological drivers of forest restoration success

Renato Crouzeilles, Michael Curran, Mariana S. Ferreira, David B. Lindenmayer, Carlos E. V. Grelle & José M. Rey Benayas
Two billion ha have been identified globally for forest restoration. Our meta-analysis encompassing 221 study landscapes worldwide reveals forest restoration enhances biodiversity by 15–84% and vegetation structure by 36–77%, compared with degraded ecosystems. For the first time, we identify the main ecological drivers of forest restoration success (defined as a return to a reference condition, that is, old-growth forest) at both the local and landscape scale. These are as follows: the time elapsed since restoration...

Data from: Structural complexity of hunting habitat and territoriality increase the reversed sexual size dimorphism in diurnal raptors

Lorenzo Pérez-Camacho, Sara Martínez-Hesterkamp, Salvador Rebollo, Gonzalo García-Salgado & Ignacio Morales-Castilla
Despite numerous efforts and many hypotheses to explain the selective pressures that may have favoured reversed sexual dimorphism (RSD) in raptors ‐ i.e. that the female is larger than the male ‐ some drivers of RSD are still unknown. Here we analyse how much variation in RSD is explained by hunting habitat structure, territoriality or territory size. We do so using data on diurnal raptors from the New World and the Western Palearctic – i.e....

Data from: Drivers of sex ratio bias in the eastern bongo: lower inbreeding increases the probability of being born male

Aurelio F. Malo, Tania C. Gilbert & Philip Riordan
Parent sex ratio allocation has consequences for individual fitness, population dynamics, and conservation. Theory predicts that parents should adjust offspring sex ratio when the fitness returns of producing male or female offspring varies. Previous studies have assumed that only mothers are capable of biasing offspring sex ratios, and neglected fathers given the expectation of an equal proportion of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm (CBS) in ejaculates due to sex chromosomes segregation at meiosis. This assumption...

Uptake of nitrogen forms by diploid and triploid white poplar depends on seasonal carbon use strategy and elevated summer ozone

Miaomiao Wang, Guolei Li, Zhaozhong Feng, Yong Liu, Yansen Xu & Mercedes Uscola
This dataset contains data from an experiment described in the paper: "Miaomiao Wang, Guolei Li, Zhaozhong Feng, Yong Liu, Yansen Xu, Mercedes Uscola. Uptake of nitrogen forms by diploid and triploid white poplar depends on seasonal carbon use strategy and elevated summer ozone. Journal of Experimental Botany, erab317, https://doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erab317". In the study, we investigated the mechanisms of N forms acquisition in response to developmental phase allowing us to analyze the plasticity in N forms preferences...

Data from: On the specificity of avian blood parasites: revealing specific and generalist relationships between haemosporidians and biting midges

Josué Martínez-De La Puente, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero-De Aguilar, Jessica Herrero & Santiago Merino
The study of host-parasite relationships involving vector-borne parasites requires understanding interactions between parasites and vectors. The capacity of haemosporidians to infect insects has clear evolutionary consequences for the transmission of diseases. Here we investigated (1) the associations between blood parasites, biting midges and birds and (2) the potential specificity between biting midge and haemosporidian haplotypes. A total of 629 parous biting midges Culicoides and 224 wild birds (belonging to seven species) from a locality of...

Individual quality and extra-pair paternity in the blue tit: sexy males bear the costs

Elisa P Badás, Amaia Autor, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero-De Aguilar & Santiago Merino
Adaptive explanations for the evolution of extra-pair paternity (EPP) suggest that females seek extra-pair copulations with high quality males. Still, the link between ornamentation, individual quality and paternity remains unclear. Moreover, honest signaling is essential when explaining EPP because it is needed for sexual selection to occur; yet, it is understudied in multiple ornaments. Because blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) show variable color expression in several plumage patches, we tested: (i) over two seasons, whether males...

Atlas of the vascular flora of the Iberian Peninsula biodiversity hotspot (AFLIBER)

Ignacio Ramos-Gutiérrez, Herlander Lima, Santiago Pajarón, Carlos Romero-Zarco, Llorenç Sáez, Rafael Molina-Venegas, Miguel Ángel Rodríguez & Juan Carlos Moreno-Saiz
Motivation: We accessed published and unpublished floristic sources to compile a comprehensive species list of the Iberian-Balearic terrestrial vascular flora and generate AFLIBER, an accurate floristic database of georeferenced plant occurrence records. Main type of variable contained: Species distribution data totaling 1,824,549 plant occurrence records corresponding to 6,456 species and subspecies. Spatial location and grain: The western Mediterranean, including inland territories of Spain, Portugal and Andorra and the adjacent archipelagos of Berlengas, Columbretes, and Balearic...

Data from: Ageing and reproduction: antioxidant supplementation alleviates telomere loss in wild birds

Elisa P. Badas, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero De Aguilar Cachafeiro, Francisco Miranda, Jordi Figuerola & Santiago Merino
Reproduction is inherently costly. Environmental stressors, such as infection and limited food resources, can compromise investment at each breeding attempt. For example, recent data on captive birds showed that increased reproductive effort accelerates ageing. However, the effects of nutritional status and infection on ageing remain unknown. Telomeres function as protective caps at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, and changes in telomere length is a commonly used proxy for ageing. To partially address the mechanisms of...

Data from: Assessing among-lineage variability in phylogenetic imputation of functional trait datasets

Rafael Molin-Venegas, Juan Carlos Moreno-Saiz, Isabel Castro Castro, T. Jonathan Davies, Pedro R. Peres-Neto, Miguel Á. Rodriguez & Rafael Molina-Venegas
Phylogenetic imputation has recently emerged as a potentially powerful tool for predicting missing data in functional traits datasets. As such, understanding the limitations of phylogenetic modelling in predicting trait values is critical if we are to use them in subsequent analyses. Previous studies have focused on the relationship between phylogenetic signal and clade-level prediction accuracy, yet variability in prediction accuracy among individual tips of phylogenies remains largely unexplored. Here, we used simulations of trait evolution...

Data from: MHC-I provides both quantitative resistance and susceptibility to blood parasites in blue tits in the wild

Juan Rivero-De Aguilar, Helena Westerdahl, Josue Martínez-De La Puente, Gustavo Tomas, Javier Martínez & Santiago Merino
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are central for the adaptive immune response against parasites. Here, we investigated potential associations among MHC-I alleles and blood parasite infections in a natural breeding population of a passerine bird, the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, in central Spain. We screened both infection status (presence/absence of infection) and infection intensity to the pathogenic blood parasites Haemoproteus and Leucocytozoon. Three MHC-I alleles (UA104, UA108 and UA117) were associated with higher or lower...

Data from: Untangling human and environmental effects on geographical gradients of mammal species richness: a global and regional evaluation

Erik Joaquin Torres-Romero & Miguel-Á Olalla-Tárraga
Different hypotheses (geographic, ecological, evolutionary or a combination of them) have been suggested to account for the spatial variation in species richness. However, the relative importance of environment and human impacts in explaining these patterns, either globally or at the biogeographic region level, remains largely unexplored. Here we jointly evaluate how current environmental conditions and human impacts shape global and regional gradients of species richness in terrestrial mammals. We processed IUCN global distributional data for...

Data from: Heat tolerance is more variable than cold tolerance across species of Iberian lizards after controlling for intraspecific variation

Salvador Herrando-Pérez, Camila Monasterio, Wouter Beukema, Verónica Gomes, Francisco Gomes Ferri-Yáñez, Josabel Belliure, Steven L. Chown, Lauren B Buckley, David R. Vieites & Miguel B. Araújo
The widespread observation that heat tolerance is less variable than cold tolerance (‘cold-tolerance asymmetry’) leads to the prediction that species exposed to temperatures near their thermal maxima should have reduced evolutionary potential for adapting to climate warming. However, the prediction is largely supported by species-level global studies based on single estimates of both physiological metrics per taxon. We ask if cold-tolerance asymmetry holds for Iberian lizards after accounting for intraspecific variation in critical thermal maxima...

Data from: A phylogenetic study to assess the link between biome specialisation and diversification in swallowtail butterflies

Sara Gamboa, Fabien L. Condamine, Juan L. Cantalapiedra, Sara Varela, Jonathan Pelegrín, Iris Menéndez, Fernando Blanco & Manuel Hernández Fernández
The resource-use hypothesis, proposed by E.S. Vrba, states that habitat fragmentation caused by climatic oscillations would affect particularly biome specialists (species inhabiting only one biome), which might show higher speciation and extinction rates than biome generalists. If true, lineages would accumulate biome-specialist species. This effect would be particularly exacerbated for biomes located at the periphery of the global climatic conditions, namely, biomes that have high/low precipitation and high/low temperature such as rainforest (warm-humid), desert (warm-dry),...

Data from: Adaptive responses to cool climate promotes persistence of a non-native lizard

Geoffrey M. While, Joseph Williamson, Graham Prescott, Terézia Horváthová, Belén Fresnillo, Nicholas J. Beeton, Ben Halliwell, Sozos Michaelides, Tobias Uller & T. Horvathova
Successful establishment and range expansion of non-native species often require rapid accommodation of novel environments. Here, we use common-garden experiments to demonstrate parallel adaptive evolutionary response to a cool climate in populations of wall lizards (Podarcis muralis) introduced from southern Europe into England. Low soil temperatures in the introduced range delay hatching, which generates directional selection for a shorter incubation period. Non-native lizards from two separate lineages have responded to this selection by retaining their...

Prevalence and polymorphism of a mussel transmissible cancer in Europe__GenotypeKASPdatasetMytilus

Maurine Hammel, Alexis Simon, Christine Arbiol, Antonio Villalba, Erika A.V. Burioli, Jean-François Pépin, Jean-Baptiste Lamy, Abdellah Benabdelmouna, Ismael Bernard, Maryline Houssin, Guillaume M. Charrière, Delphine Destoumieux-Garzon, Jonh Welch, Michael J. Metzger & Nicolas Bierne
Transmissible cancers are parasitic malignant cell lineages that acquired the ability to infect new hosts from the same species, or sometimes related species. First described in dogs and Tasmanian devils, transmissible cancers were later discovered in some marine bivalves affected by a leukemia-like disease. In Mytilus mussels, two lineages of Bivalve Transmissible Neoplasia (BTN), both emerged in a M. trossulus founder individual, have been described to date (MtrBTN1 and MtrBTN2). Here, we performed an extensive...

Data from: Comparing methods for mapping global parasite diversity

Paula Pappalardo, Ignacio Morales-Castilla, Andrew Park, Shan Huang, John Schmidt & Patrick Stephens
Aim Parasites are a major component of global ecosystems, yet spatial variation in parasite diversity is poorly known, largely because their occurrence data are limited and thus difficult to interpret. Using a recently compiled database of parasite occurrences, we compare different models which we use to infer parasite geographic ranges and parasite species richness across the globe. Innovation To date, most studies exploring spatial patterns of parasite diversity assumed, with little validation, that the geographic...

Data from: Corrigendum to: Deep learning improves taphonomic resolution: high accuracy in differentiating tooth marks made by lions and jaguars

Blanca Jiménez-García
Corrigendum to "Deep learning improves taphonomic resolution: high accuracy in differentiating tooth marks made by lions and jaguars". In a previous paper, we presented some convolutional neural network (CNN) models to classify images of tooth scores made by lions and jaguars through deep learning computer vision. In that work, we reached an accuracy of 82% of the testing set correctly classified. However, such an accuracy is biased, since the original sample was highly unbalanced. Therefor,...

Tree growth response to drought partially explains regional-scale growth and mortality patterns in Iberian forests

Antonio Gazol, J. Julio Camarero, Raúl Sánchez-Salguero, Miguel A. Zavala, Xavier Serra-Maluquer, Emilia Gutiérrez, Martín De Luis, Gabriel Sangüesa-Barreda, Klemen Novak, Vicente Rozas, Pedro A. Tíscar, Juan C. Linares, Edurne Martínez Del Castillo, Montse Ribas, Ignacio García-González, Fernando Silla, Álvaro Camison, Mar Génova, José M. Olano, Ana-Maria Hereş, Jorge Curiel Yuste, Luis A. Longares, Andrea Hevia, J. Diego Galván & Paloma Ruiz-Benito
To quantify responses to drought from different data sources we take advantage of an extensive network of cross-dated tree-ring data with increment cores from 16 tree species sampled across the Spanish Iberian Peninsula (hereafter abbreviated as RWI-net), and of the Spanish National Forest Inventory (hereafter abbreviated as NFI) sampling tree and plot level data each km in forested areas. We selected the five most severe droughts that have affected each selected RWI-net population in the...

Data from: On the specificity of avian blood parasites: revealing specific and generalist relationships between haemosporidians and biting midges

Josué Martínez-De La Puente, Javier Martínez, Juan Rivero-De Aguilar, Jessica Herrero & Santiago Merino
The study of host-parasite relationships involving vector-borne parasites requires understanding interactions between parasites and vectors. The capacity of haemosporidians to infect insects has clear evolutionary consequences for the transmission of diseases. Here we investigated (1) the associations between blood parasites, biting midges and birds and (2) the potential specificity between biting midge and haemosporidian haplotypes. A total of 629 parous biting midges Culicoides and 224 wild birds (belonging to seven species) from a locality of...

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