16 Works

Data from: Bacterial diversity amplifies nutrient-based plant-soil feedbacks

Simone Weidner, Robert Koller, Ellen Latz, George Kowalchuk, Michael Bonkowski, Stefan Scheu & Alexandre Jousset
Plants foster diverse assemblages of bacteria in the rhizosphere serving important functions which may result in enhanced plant growth. Microbial diversity is increasingly recognized to shape the functionality of microbial communities. This leads to the assumption that there is a positive relationship between rhizosphere diversity and plant growth. Here we investigate how bacterial diversity affects the mineralization of organic matter and plant nutrient acquisition. We hypothesized that altered bacterial diversity will affect nitrogen mineralisation, uptake...

Data from: Sex-related online behaviors, perceived peer norms and adolescents’ experience with sexual behavior: testing an integrative model

Suzan M. Doornwaard, Tom F. M. Ter Bogt, Ellen Reitz & Regina J. J. M. Van Den Eijnden
Research on the role of sex-related Internet use in adolescents’ sexual development has often isolated the Internet and online behaviors from other, offline influencing factors in adolescents’ lives, such as processes in the peer domain. The aim of this study was to test an integrative model explaining how receptive (i.e., use of sexually explicit Internet material [SEIM]) and interactive (i.e., use of social networking sites [SNS]) sex-related online behaviors interrelate with perceived peer norms in...

Data from: Locomotion during digestion changes current estimates of seed dispersal kernels by fish

Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen, Rosanne Beukeboom, Bart A. Nolet, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Bart J. A. Pollux & Bart J.A. Pollux
Dispersal of seeds by animals is an important mechanism regulating plant diversity, range expansions and invasions. Many birds, mammals, fish, and reptiles regularly ingest, transport and excrete viable seeds (known as endozoochory). The effectiveness of endozoochory is modelled in dispersal kernels: functions that describe seed shadows in the landscape by combining movement of animals with experimentally obtained seed retention times and survival. Currently, dispersal kernels use experimental data from resting animals, yet only moving animals...

Data from: Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

Dimitrios Floudas, Benjamin W. Held, Robert Riley, Laszlo G. Nagy, Gage Koehler, Anthony S. Ransdell, Hina Younus, Julianna Chow, Jennifer Chiniquy, Anna Lipzen, Andrew Tritt, Hui Sun, Sajeet Haridas, Kurt LaButti, Robin A. Ohm, Ursula Kues, Robert A. Blanchette, Igor V. Grigoriev, Robert E. Minto & David S. Hibbett
Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related...

Data from: Complementarity in both plant and mycorrhizal fungal communities are not necessarily increased by diversity in the other

Cameron Wagg, Christoph Barendregt, Jan Jansa, Marcel G. A. Van Der Heijden & Marcel G.A. Van Der Heijden
1. Higher species diversity can improve community performance within a species guild when different species complement each other in their use of the available niche, such as through resource partitioning. However, species in one guild of organisms may act as resources for another such that the diversity in one guild alters the realized niche for species in another. Yet, it remains largely untested as to whether diversity in one guild of organisms influences species complementarity...

Data from: \"Development of the draft genome sequence of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae as a reference of population genomic analysis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 February 2015 – 31 March 2015

Yuki Minegishi, Minoru Ikeda, Lynda F. Delph, Laura A. Weingartner, Peter D. Fields, Laura Bertini, Carla Caruso, Silvia Proietti, Wolfgang Arthofer, Francesco Cicconardi, Heike Ritthammer, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner, Gregor A. Wachter & Herbert C. Wagner
This article documents the public availability of the draft genome sequence data (raw reads, assembled contigs and unassembled reads) and RAD-tag read data of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae (Pleuronectiformes; Pleuronectidae).

Data from: Corrections for rooting volume and plant size reveal negative effects of neighbour presence on root allocation in pea

Bin J. W. Chen, Heinjo J. During, Peter J. Vermeulen, Hans De Kroon, Hendrik Poorter & Niels P. R. Anten
Plants are able to detect the presence of their neighbours belowground. The associated root responses may affect plant performance, plant-plant interactions and community dynamics, but the extent and direction of these responses is heavily debated. Some studies suggest that plants will over-proliferate roots in response to neighbours at the expense of reproduction, which was framed as a “tragedy of the commons”. Others proposed an “ideal free distribution” hypothesis, stating that plants produce roots simply as...

Data from: Peatland vascular plant functional types affect methane dynamics by altering microbial community structure

Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey, Martine A. R. Kox, Roeland L. Berendsen, Robert T. E. Mills, Lauric Cécillon, Jéremy Puissant, Marion Meima–Franke, Peter A. H. M. Bakker, Paul L. E. Bodelier & Marion Meima-Franke
1. Peatlands are natural sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas. It is established that peatland methane dynamics are controlled by both biotic and abiotic conditions, yet the interactive effect of these drivers is less studied and consequently poorly understood. 2. Climate change affects the distribution of vascular plant functional types (PFTs) in peatlands. By removing specific PFTs, we assessed their effects on peat organic matter chemistry, microbial community composition and on potential...

Data from: Strong and stable geographic differentiation of swamp buffalo maternal and paternal lineages indicates domestication in the China/Indochina border region

Yi Zhang, Yongfang Lu, Marnoch Yindee, Kuan-Yi Li, Hsiao-Yun Kuo, Yu-Ten Ju, Shaohui Ye, , Qiang Li, Yachun Wang, Vu Chi Cuong, Lan Doan Pham, Bounthong Bouahom, Bingzhuang Yang, Xianwei Liang, Zhihua Cai, Dianne Vankan, Wallaya Manatchaiworakul, Nonglid Kowlim, Somphot Duangchantrasiri, Worawidh Wajjwalku, Ben Colenbrander, Yuan Zhang, Peter Beerli, Johannes A. Lenstra … & J. Stuart F. Barker
The swamp type of the Asian water buffalo is assumed to have been domesticated by about 4000 years BP, following the introduction of rice cultivation. Previous localizations of the domestication site were based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation within China, accounting only for the maternal lineage. We carried out a comprehensive sampling of China, Taiwan, Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, Nepal and Bangladesh and sequenced the mtDNA Cytochrome b gene and control region and the Y-chromosomal ZFY,...

Data from: Microsatellite genotyping of medieval cattle from central Italy suggests an old origin of Chianina and Romagnola cattle

Maria Gargani, Lorraine Pariset, Johannes A. Lenstra, Elisabetta De Minicis & Alessio Valentini
Analysis of DNA from archaeological remains is a valuable tool to interpret the history of ancient animal populations. So far most studies of ancient DNA target mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which reveals maternal lineages, but only partially the relationships of current breeds and ancient populations. In this study we explore the feasibility of nuclear DNA analysis. DNA was extracted from 1000-years old cattle bone collected from Ferento, an archaeological site in central Italy. Amplification of 15...

Data from: Parasitism overrides herbivore identity allowing hyperparasitoids to locate their parasitoid host by using herbivore-induced plant volatiles

Feng Zhu, Colette Broekgaarden, Berhane T. Weldegergis, Jeffrey A. Harvey, Ben Vosman, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
Foraging success of predators profoundly depends on reliable and detectable cues indicating the presence of their often inconspicuous prey. Carnivorous insects rely on chemical cues to optimize foraging efficiency. Hyperparasitoids that lay their eggs in the larvae or pupae of parasitic wasps may find their parasitoid hosts developing in different herbivores. They can use herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) to locate parasitized caterpillars. Because different herbivore species induce different HIPV emission from plants, hyperparasitoids may have...

Data from: A modelling framework to assess the effect of pressures on river abiotic habitat conditions and biota

Jochem Kail, Björn Guse, Johannes Radinger, Maria Schröder, Jens Kiesel, Maarten Kleinhans, Filip Schuurman, Nicola Fohrer, Daniel Hering & Christian Wolter
River biota are affected by global reach-scale pressures, but most approaches for predicting biota of rivers focus on river reach or segment scale processes and habitats. Moreover, these approaches do not consider long-term morphological changes that affect habitat conditions. In this study, a modelling framework was further developed and tested to assess the effect of pressures at different spatial scales on reach-scale habitat conditions and biota. Ecohydrological and 1D hydrodynamic models were used to predict...

Data from: Merino and Merino-derived sheep breeds: a genome-wide intercontinental study

Elena Ciani, Emiliano Lasagna, Mariasilvia D’Andrea, Ingrid Alloggio, Fabio Marroni, Simone Ceccobelli, Juan Vicente Delgado Bermejo, Francesca Maria Sarti, James Kijas, Johannes A. Lenstra, Fabio Pilla & International Sheep Genomics Consortium
Background: Merino and Merino-derived sheep breeds have been widely distributed across the world, both as purebred and admixed populations. They represent an economically and historically important genetic resource which over time has been used as the basis for the development of new breeds. In order to examine the genetic influence of Merino in the context of a global collection of domestic sheep breeds, we analyzed genotype data that were obtained with the OvineSNP50 BeadChip (Illumina)...

Data from: Dispersal versus environmental filtering in a dynamic system: drivers of vegetation patterns and diversity along stream riparian gradients

Rob G. A. Fraaije, Cajo J. F. Ter Braak, Betty Verduyn, Jos T. A. Verhoeven & Merel B. Soons
1. Both environmental filtering and dispersal filtering are known to influence plant species distribution patterns and biodiversity. Particularly in dynamic habitats, however, it remains unclear whether environmental filtering (stimulated by stressful conditions) or dispersal filtering (during re-colonization events) dominates in community assembly, or how they interact. Such a fundamental understanding of community assembly is critical to the design of biodiversity conservation and restoration strategies. 2. Stream riparian zones are species-rich dynamic habitats. They are characterized...

Data from: Phosphatidylthreonine and lipid-mediated control of parasite virulence

Ruben D. Arroyo-Olarte, Jos F. Brouwers, Arunakar Kuchipudi, J. Bernd Helms, Aindrila Biswas, Ildiko R. Dunay, Richard Lucius & Nishith Gupta
The major membrane phospholipid classes, described thus far, include phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn), phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns). Here, we demonstrate the natural occurrence and genetic origin of an exclusive and rather abundant lipid, phosphatidylthreonine (PtdThr), in a common eukaryotic model parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The parasite expresses a novel enzyme PtdThr synthase (TgPTS) to produce this lipid in its endoplasmic reticulum. Genetic disruption of TgPTS abrogates de novo synthesis of PtdThr and impairs the lytic...

Data from: Early plant recruitment stages set the template for the development of vegetation patterns along a hydrological gradient

Rob G. A. Fraaije, Cajo J. F. Ter Braak, Betty Verduyn, Leonieke B. S. Breeman, Jos T. A. Verhoeven & Merel B. Soons
1. Recruitment processes are critical components of a plant's life cycle. However, in comparison with later stages in the plant life cycle (e.g. competition among adults), relatively little is known about their contribution to the regulation of plant species distribution. Particularly little is known about the individual contributions of the three main recruitment processes—germination, seedling survival, and seedling growth—to community assembly, while quantitative information on these contributions is essential for a more mechanistic understanding of...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    16

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    16

Affiliations

  • Utrecht University
    16
  • Wageningen University & Research
    5
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    3
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    2
  • Tuscia University
    2
  • National Institute of Animal Sciences
    1
  • Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg
    1
  • University of Cologne
    1
  • University of Queensland
    1
  • University of Perugia
    1