10 Works

Data from: Do plant traits explain tree seedling survival in bogs?

Juul Limpens, Emily Van Egmond, Bingxi Li & Milena Holmgren
Moss-dominated peat bogs store approximately 30% of global soil carbon. A climate induced shift from current moss-dominated conditions to tree-dominated states is expected to strongly affect their functioning and carbon sequestration capacity. Consequently, unraveling the mechanisms that may explain successful tree seedling establishment in these ecosystems is highly relevant. To assess the role of drought on early tree seedling establishment and the relative importance of plant traits in tree seedling survival, we conducted a factorial...

Data from: Replicated high-density genetic maps of two great tit populations reveal fine-scale genomic departures from sex-equal recombination rates

Kees Van Oers, Anna W. Santure, Isabelle De Cauwer, Nikkie E. M. Van Bers, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Ben C. Sheldon, Marcel E. Visser, Jon Slate & Martien A. M. Groenen
Linking variation in quantitative traits to variation in the genome is an important, but challenging task in the study of life-history evolution. Linkage maps provide a valuable tool for the unravelling of such trait-gene associations. Moreover, they give insight into recombination landscapes and between- species karyotype evolution. Here we used genotype data, generated from a 10k SNP-chip, of over 2000 individuals to produce high-density linkage maps of the great tit (Parus major), a passerine bird,...

Data from: Genetic consequences of breaking migratory traditions in barnacle geese Branta leucopsis

Rudy M. Jonker, Robert H. S. Kraus, Qiong Zhang, Pim Van Hooft, Kjell Larsson, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers, Sip E. Van Wieren, Maarten J. J. M. Loonen, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Ronald C. Ydenberg, Martien A. M. Groenen, Herbert H. T. Prins & M. J. J. E. Loonen
Cultural transmission of migratory traditions enables species to deal with their environment based on experiences from earlier generations. Also, it allows a more adequate and rapid response to rapidly changing environments. When individuals break with their migratory traditions, new population structures can emerge that may affect gene flow. Recently, the migratory traditions of the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis changed, and new populations differing in migratory distance emerged. Here, we investigate the population genetic structure of...

Data from: Stable isotope labeled n-alkanes to assess digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of ruminants

Daniel Warner, Luis M. M. Ferreira, Michel J. H. Breuer, Jan Dijkstra & Wilbert F. Pellikaan
We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows receiving four contrasting ryegrass silage treatments that differed in nitrogen fertilization level (45 or 90 kg nitrogen ha−1) and maturity (early or late). Passage kinetics through the gastrointestinal tract were...

Data from: Changing drivers of species dominance during tropical forest succession

Madelon Lohbeck, Lourens Poorter, Miguel Martínez-Ramos, Jorge Rodriguez-Velázquez, Michiel Van Breugel & Frans Bongers
1. Deterministic theories predict that local communities assemble from a regional species pool based on niche differences, thus by plant functional adaptations. We tested whether functional traits can also explain patterns in species dominance among the suite of co-occurring species. 2. We predicted that along a gradient of secondary succession the main driver of species dominance changes from environmental filtering in the relatively harsh (dry and hot) early successional conditions, towards increased competitive interactions and...

Data from: Development of a Nasonia vitripennis outbred laboratory population for genetic analysis

Louis Van De Zande, Steven Ferber, Ammerins De Haan, Leo W. Beukeboom, Joost Van Heerwaarden & Bart A. Pannebakker
The parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia has rapidly become a genetic model system for developmental and evolutionary biology. The release of its genome sequence led to the development of high-resolution genomic tools, for both interspecific and intraspecific research, which has resulted in great advances in understanding Nasonia biology. To further advance the utility of Nasonia vitripennis as a genetic model system and to be able to fully exploit the advantages of its fully sequenced and annotated...

Data from: Multilevel selection with kin and non-kin groups, experimental results with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)

William M. Muir, Piter Bijma, Allan Schinckel & William. M. Muir
An experiment was conducted comparing multilevel selection in Japanese quail for 43 days weight and survival with birds housed in either kin (K) or random (R) groups. Multilevel selection significantly reduced mortality (6.6% K vs. 8.5% R) and increased weight (1.30 g/MG K vs. 0.13 g/MG R) resulting in response an order of magnitude greater with Kin than Random. Thus multilevel selection was effective in reducing detrimental social interactions, which contributed to improved weight gain....

Data from: Paths to selection on life history loci in different natural environments across the native range of Arabidopsis thaliana

Alexandre Fournier-Level, Amity M. Wilczek, Martha D. Cooper, Judith L. Roe, Jillian Anderson, Deren Eaton, Brook T. Moyers, Renee H. Petipas, Robert N. Schaeffer, Bjorn Pieper, Matthieu Reymond, Maarten Koornneef, Stephen M. Welch, David L. Remington & Johanna Schmitt
Selection on quantitative trait loci (QTL) may vary among natural environments due to differences in the genetic architecture of traits, environment-specific allelic effects or changes in the direction and magnitude of selection on specific traits. To dissect the environmental differences in selection on life history QTL across climatic regions, we grew a panel of interconnected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Arabidopsis thaliana in four field sites across its native European range. For each environment, we...

Data from: The scent of inbreeding: male sex pheromones betray inbred males

Erik Van Bergen, Paul M. Brakefield, Stéphanie Heuskin, Bas J. Zwaan & Caroline M. Nieberding
Inbreeding depression results from mating among genetically related individuals and impairs reproductive success. The decrease in male mating success is usually attributed to an impact on multiple fitness-related traits that reduce the general condition of inbred males. Here we find that the production of the male sex pheromone is reduced significantly by inbreeding in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana. Other traits indicative of the general condition, including flight performance, are also negatively affected in male butterflies...

Data from: Surviving in a marine desert: the sponge loop retains resources within coral reefs

Jasper M. De Goeij, Dick Van Oevelen, Mark J. A. Vermeij, Ronald Osinga, Jack J. Middelburg, Anton F. P. M. De Goeij & Wim Admiraal
Ever since Darwin’s early descriptions of coral reefs, scientists have debated how one of the world’s most productive and diverse ecosystems can thrive in the marine equivalent of a desert. It is an enigma how the flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM), the largest resource produced on reefs, is transferred to higher trophic levels. Here we show that sponges make DOM available to fauna by rapidly expelling filter cells as detritus that is subsequently consumed...

Registration Year

  • 2013
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    10
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Linnaeus University
    1
  • University of Maine at Presque Isle
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    1
  • Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1