59 Works

Data from: The early-life environment of a pig shapes the phenotypes of its social partners in adulthood

Laurianne Canario, Nils Lundeheim & Piter Bijma
Social interactions among individuals are abundant, both in natural and domestic populations, and may affect phenotypes of individuals. Recent research has demonstrated that the social effect of an individual on the phenotype of its social partners may have a genetic component, known as an Indirect Genetic Effect (IGE). Little is known, however, of non-genetic factors underlying such social effects. Early life environments often have large effects on phenotypes of the individuals themselves later in life....

Data from: Frequency tuning and directional sensitivity of tympanal vibrations in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

Martin J. Lankheet, Uroš Cerkvenik, Ole N. Larsen & Johan L. Van Leeuwen
Female field crickets use phonotaxis to locate males by their calling song. Male song production and female behavioural sensitivity form a pair of matched frequency filters, which in Gryllus bimaculatus are tuned to a frequency of about 4.7 kHz. Directional sensitivity is supported by an elaborate system of acoustic tracheae, which make the ears function as pressure difference receivers. As a result, phase differences between left and right sound inputs are transformed into vibration amplitude...

Data from: Feeding preference as a main determinant of microscale patchiness among terrestrial nematodes

Casper W. Quist, Gerrit Gort, Christian Mulder, Ruud H. P. Wilbers, Aad J. Termorshuizen, Jaap Bakker & Johannes Helder
Soil biota are responsible for essential ecosystem services such as carbon storage, nutrient cycling and water retention. However, assessment of the condition of soil biota is hampered by an overwhelming level of diversity. With representatives in all trophic levels of the food web, nematode communities can be used as bio-indicators. Accurate assessment of nematode assemblages requires insight in the distribution of specimens with distinct food preferences. With the availability of taxon-specific quantitative-PCR assays, distribution patterns...

Data from: The differential impact of a native and a non-native ragwort species (Senecioneae) on the first and second trophic level of the rhizosphere food web

Paula Harkes, Ava Verhoeven, Mark G. Sterken, L. Basten Snoek, Sven J. J. Van Den Elsen, Paul J. W. Mooijman, Casper W. Quist, Mariëtte T. W. Vervoort & Johannes Helder
Whereas the impact of exotic plant species on above-ground biota is relatively well-documented, far less is known about the effects of non-indigenous plants on the first and second trophic level of the rhizosphere food web. Here, rhizosphere communities of the invasive narrow-leaved ragwort Senecio inaequidens and the native tansy ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris, co-occurring in three semi-natural habitats are compared. For both species, two life stages were taken into consideration. Quantitative PCR assays for the analyses...

Data from: Woodland ectomycorrhizal fungi benefit from large-scale reduction of nitrogen deposition in the Netherlands

Arco J. Van Strien, Menno Boomsluiter, Machiel E. Noordeloos, Richard J. T. Verweij & Thomas W. Kuyper
1.Woodland ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal species declined considerably in the Netherlands in the late 20th century, mainly due to raised levels of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Environmental measures have been taken to reduce this deposition, but it remains unclear whether and to what extent ECM species have benefitted from this. 2.We hypothesised that ECM species, especially those species that are known to be nitrophobic, i.e. sensitive to nitrogen loading, have recovered to some extent from the reduction...

Data from: Detecting environment-dependent diversification from phylogenies: a simulation study and some empirical illustrations

Eric Lewitus & Hélène Morlon
Understanding the relative influence of various abiotic and biotic variables on diversification dynamics is a major goal of macroevolutionary studies. Recently, phylogenetic approaches have been developed that make it possible to estimate the role of various environmental variables on diversification using time-calibrated species trees, paleoenvironmental data, and maximum-likelihood techniques. These approaches have been effectively employed to estimate how speciation and extinction rates vary with key abiotic variables, such as temperature and sea level, and we...

Data from: Relatedness with plant species in native community influences ecological consequences of range expansions

Kadri Koorem, Olga Kostenko, L. Basten Snoek, Carolin Weser, Kelly S. Ramirez, Rutger A. Wilschut & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Global warming is enabling many plant species to expand their range to higher latitudes and altitudes, where they may suffer less from natural aboveground and belowground enemies. Reduced control by natural enemies can enable climate warming-induced range expanders to get an advantage in competition with natives and become disproportionally abundant in their new range. However, so far studies have examined individual growth of range expanders, which have common congeneric plant species in their new range....

Data from: Parallel diversifications of Cremastosperma and Mosannona (Annonaceae), tropical rainforest trees tracking Neogene upheaval of South America

Michael D. Pirie, Paul J.M. Maas, Rutger A. Wilschut, Heleen Melchers-Sharrott & Lars W. Chatrou
Much of the immense present day biological diversity of Neotropical rainforests originated from the Miocene onwards, a period of geological and ecological upheaval in South America. We assess the impact of the Andean orogeny, drainage of lake Pebas, and closure of the Panama Isthmus on two clades of tropical trees (Cremastosperma, c. 31 spp.; and Mosannona, c. 14 spp.; both Annonaceae). Phylogenetic inference revealed similar patterns of geographically restricted clades and molecular dating showed diversifications...

Data from: Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures

Jordan S. Goetze, Joachim Claudet, Fraser Januchowski-Hartley, Timothy J. Langlois, Shaun K. Wilson, Crow White, Rebecca Weeks & Stacy D. Jupiter
1.Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2.We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple...

Data from: Intestinal Ralstonia pickettii augments glucose intolerance in obesity

Shanthadevi Udayappan, Petia Kovatcheva-Datchary, Guido Bakker, Stefan Havik, Hilde Herrema, Patrice Cani, Kristien Bouter, Clara Belzer, Julia J. Witjes, Anne Vrieze, Eleonore Susanne Victoria De Sonnaville, Alice Chaplin, Daniel Van Raalte, Steven Aalvink, Geesje Dallinga-Thie, Hans Heilig, Goran Bergstrom, Suzan Van Der Meij, Bart Van Wagensveld, Joost Hoekstra, Frits Holleman, Erik Stroes, Albert Groen, Fredrik Backhed, Willem De Vos … & Daniel H. Van Raalte
An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic disease including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Low grade inflammation, potentially initiated by the intestinal microbiota, has been suggested to be a driving force in the development of insulin resistance in obesity. Here, we report that bacterial DNA is present in mesenteric adipose tissue of obese but otherwise healthy human subjects. Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that DNA...

Data from: Plant community evenness responds to spatial plant-soil feedback heterogeneity primarily through the diversity of soil conditioning

E. R. Jasper Wubs & Martijn T. Bezemer
1.Plant-soil feedback (PSF) has been identified as a key driver of local plant diversity and evenness in competitive communities. However, while it has been shown that spatial PSF heterogeneity can alter plant performance and competitive interactions, there is no proof of principle that spatial PSF heterogeneity enhances community diversity. 2.Using a grassland model system we separated two aspects of spatial heterogeneity: the number of species conditioning the soil and spatial distribution of the PSFs. 3.Our...

Data from: Belowground complementarity effects in a grassland biodiversity experiment are related to deep-rooting species

Natalie J. Oram, Janneke M. Ravenek, Kathryn E. Barry, Alexandra Weigelt, Hongmei Chen, Arthur Gessler, Annette Gockele, Hans De Kroon, Jan Willem Van Der Paauw, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen, Annemiek Smit-Tiekstra, Jasper Van Ruijven & Liesje Mommer
1. Belowground resource partitioning is often proposed as the underlying mechanism for the positive relationship between plant species richness and productivity. For example, if species have different root distributions, a mixture of plant species may be able to use the available resources more completely than the individual species in a monoculture. However, there is little experimental evidence for differentiation in vertical root distributions among species and its contribution to biodiversity effects. 2. We determined species-specific...

Data from: Balancing food and density-dependence in the spatial distribution of an interference-prone forager

Adriaan Dokter, E. Emiel Van Loon, Cornelis Rappoldt, Kees Oosterbeek, Martin J. Baptist, Willem Bouten, Bruno J. Ens & Adriaan M. Dokter
Foraging distributions are thought to be density-dependent, because animals not only select for a high availability and quality of resources, but also avoid conspecific interference. Since these processes are confounded, their relative importance in shaping foraging distributions remains poorly understood. Here we aimed to rank the contribution of density-dependent and density-independent effects on the spatio-temporal foraging patterns of eurasian oystercatchers. In our intertidal study area, tides caused continuous variation in oystercatcher density, providing an opportunity...

Data from: Root biomass and exudates link plant diversity with soil bacterial and fungal biomass

Nico Eisenhauer, Arnaud Lanoue, Tanja Strecker, Stefan Scheu, Katja Steinauer, Madhav P. Thakur & Liesje Mommer
Plant diversity has been shown to determine the composition and functioning of soil biota. Although root-derived organic inputs are discussed as the main drivers of soil communities, experimental evidence is scarce. While there is some evidence that higher root biomass at high plant diversity increases substrate availability for soil biota, several studies have speculated that the quantity and diversity of root inputs into the soil, i.e. though root exudates, drive plant diversity effects on soil...

Data from: Coordinated responses of soil communities to elevation in three subarctic vegetation types

G. F. Ciska Veen, Jonathan R. De Long, Paul Kardol, Maja K. Sundqvist, L. Basten Snoek & David A. Wardle
Global warming has begun to have a major impact on the species composition and functioning of plant and soil communities. However, long-term community and ecosystem responses to increased temperature are still poorly understood. In this study, we used a well-established elevational gradient in northern Sweden to elucidate how plant, microbial and nematode communities shift with elevation and associated changes in temperature in three highly contrasting vegetation types (i.e. heath, meadow and Salix vegetation). We found...

Data from: Artificial night lighting inhibits feeding in moths

Frank Van Langevelde, Elmar M. Veenendaal, Thijs P. M. Fijen & Roy H. A. Van Grunsven
One major, yet poorly studied, change in the environment is nocturnal light pollution, which strongly alters habitats of nocturnally active species. Artificial night lighting is often considered as driving force behind rapid moth population declines in severely illuminated countries. To understand these declines, the question remains whether artificial light causes only increased mortality or also sublethal effects. We show that moths subjected to artificial night lighting spend less time feeding than moths in darkness, with...

Data from: Soil pathogen-aphid interactions under differences in soil organic matter and mineral fertilizer

Stijn Van Gils, Giovanni Tamburini, Lorenzo Marini, Arjen Biere, Maaike Van Agtmaal, Olaf Tyc, Martine Kos, David Kleijn & Wim H. Van Der Putten
There is increasing evidence showing that microbes can influence plant-insect interactions. In addition, various studies have shown that aboveground pathogens can alter the interactions between plants and insects. However, little is known about the role of soil-borne pathogens in plant-insect interactions. It is also not known how environmental conditions, that steer the performance of soil-borne pathogens, might influence these microbe-plant-insect interactions. Here, we studied effects of the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani on aphids (Sitobion avenae)...

Data from: Two different strategies of host manipulation allow parasites to persist in intermediate-definitive host systems

Lana J. De Vries & Frank Van Langevelde
Trophically-transmitted parasites start their development in an intermediate host, before they finish the development in their definitive host when the definitive host preys on the intermediate host. In intermediate-definitive host systems, two strategies of host manipulation have been evolved: increasing the rate of transmission to the definitive host by increasing the chance that the definitive host will prey on the intermediate host, or increasing the lifespan of the parasite in the intermediate host by decreasing...

Data from: Indices of immune function used by ecologists are mostly unaffected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles and methodological deviations

Arne Hegemann, Sara Pardal & Kevin D. Matson
Background: Over the past couple of decades, measuring immunological parameters has become widespread in studies of ecology and evolution. A combination of different immunological indices is useful for quantifying different parts of the immune system and comprehensively assessing immune function. Running multiple immune assays usually requires samples to be repeatedly thawed and re-frozen. There is some evidence that repeated freezing and thawing can affect assay results, but this has never been comprehensively studied in some...

Data from: Dealing with mutualists and antagonists: specificity of plant-mediated interactions between herbivores and flower visitors, and consequences for plant fitness

Quint Rusman, Dani Lucas-Barbosa & Erik H. Poelman
1. Plants need to deal with antagonists, such as herbivores, while maintaining interactions with mutualists, such as pollinators that help plants to maximize their reproductive output. Although many plant species have inducible defences to save metabolic costs of defence in the absence of herbivores, plant responses induced by herbivore attack can have ecological costs. For example, herbivore-induced responses can affect flower traits and alter interactions with flower visitors. Such plant-mediated interactions between herbivores and flower...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional turnover are decoupled in European peat bogs

Bjorn J. M. Robroek, Vincent E. J. Jassey, Richard J. Payne, Magalí Martí, Luca Bragazza, Albert Bleeker, Alexandre Buttler, Simon J. M. Caporn, Nancy B. Dise, Jens Kattge, Katarzyna Zając, Bo H. Svensson, Jasper Van Ruijven & Jos T. A. Verhoeven
In peatland ecosystems, plant communities mediate a globally significant carbon store. The effects of global environmental change on plant assemblages are expected to be a factor in determining how ecosystem functions such as carbon uptake will respond. Using vegetation data from 56 Sphagnum-dominated peat bogs across Europe, we show that in these ecosystems plant species aggregate into two major clusters that are each defined by shared response to environmental conditions. Across environmental gradients, we find...

Data from: How bird clades diversify in response to climatic and geographic factors

Genoveva Rodriguez-Castaneda, Anouschka R. Hof & Roland Jansson
While the environmental correlates of global patterns in standing species richness are well understood, it is poorly known which environmental factors promote diversification (speciation minus extinction) in clades. We tested several hypotheses for how geographic and climatic variables should affect diversification using a large dataset of bird sister genera endemic to the New World. We found support for the area, evolutionary speed, environmental predictability and climatic stability hypotheses, but productivity and topographic complexity were rejected...

Data from: The nature and distribution of affiliative behaviour during exposure to mild threat

Guillaume Dezecache, Julie Grezes & Christoph D. Dahl
Individual reactions to danger in humans are often characterized as antisocial and self-preservative. Yet, more than fifty years of research have showed that humans often seek social partners and behave pro-socially when confronted by danger.Yet, more than fifty years of research have showed that humans seek social partners and behave pro-socially when confronted by danger. This research has relied on post-hoc verbal reports, which fall short of capturing the more spontaneous reactions to danger and...

Data from: Landscape genetic analyses reveal fine-scale effects of forest fragmentation in an insular tropical bird

Aurélie Khimoun, William Peterman, Cyril Eraud, Bruno Faivre, Nicolas Navarro & Stéphane Garnier
Within the framework of landscape genetics, resistance surface modelling is particularly relevant to explicitly test competing hypotheses about landscape effects on gene flow. To investigate how fragmentation of tropical forest affects population connectivity in a forest specialist bird species, we optimized resistance surfaces without a priori specification, using least-cost (LCP) or resistance (IBR) distances. We implemented a two-step procedure in order (i) to objectively define the landscape thematic resolution (level of detail in classification scheme...

Data from: Phylogeography of the snake pipefish, Entelurus aequoreus (Family: Syngnathidae) in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

Ines Braga Goncalves, Luca Cornetti, Abraham S. Couperus, Cindy J. G. Van Damme & Kenyon B. Mobley
The snake pipefish, Entelurus aequoreus, is a widespread marine species occurring in pelagic and coastal environments in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean. Recently, the snake pipefish underwent a short-lived, yet substantial, increase in abundance and range expansion into arctic waters. However, little is known about the species’ population structure or if different ecotypes contributed to this outbreak. Specimens (n=178) were sampled from 25 locations from six regions spanning 1.9 million km2. A fragment of the mitochondrial...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    59
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    11
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    6
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Helsinki
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • National Institute for Public Health and the Environment
    2