65 Works

Data from: Variation in home-field advantage and ability in leaf litter decomposition across successional gradients

G.F. Ciska Veen, Ashley D. Keiser, Wim H. Van Der Putten, David A. Wardle & G. F. Ciska Veen
1. It is increasingly recognized that interactions between plants and soil (a)biotic conditions can influence local decomposition processes. For example, decomposer communities may become specialized in breaking down litter of plant species that they are associated with, resulting in accelerated decomposition, known as ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA). Also, soils can vary inherently in their capacity to degrade organic compounds, known as ‘ability’. However, we have a poor understanding how environmental conditions drive the occurrence of HFA...

Data from: Modelling the co-evolution of indirect genetic effects and inherited variability

Jovana Marjanovic, Han A. Mulder, Lars Rönnegård & Piter Bijma
When individuals interact, their phenotypes may be affected by genes in their social partners, a phenomenon known as Indirect Genetic Effects (IGEs). In aquaculture species and some plants, competition not only affects trait levels of individuals, but also inflates variation of trait values among individuals. Variability of trait values has been studied as a quantitative trait in itself, and is often referred to as inherited variability. Although the observed phenotypic relationship between competition and variability...

Data from: Three-dimensional analysis of the fast-start escape response of the least killifish, Heterandria formosa

Mike Fleuren, Johan L. Van Leeuwen, Elsa M. Quicazan-Rubio, Remco P.M. Pieters, Bart J.A. Pollux & Cees J. Voesenek
Fish make C-starts to evade predator strikes. Double-bend (DB) C-starts consist of three stages: Stage 1, in which the fish rapidly bends into a C-shape; Stage 2, in which the fish bends in the opposite direction; and a variable Stage 3. In single-bend (SB) C-starts, the fish immediately straightens after Stage 1. Despite fish moving in 3D space, fast-start responses of adult fish have mainly been studied in a horizontal plane. Using automated 3D tracking...

Data from: Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale

Alicia Dalongeville, Marco Andrello, David Mouillot, Stephane Lobreaux, Marie-Josée Fortin, Frida Lasram, Jonathan Belmaker, Delphine Rocklin & Stéphanie Manel
Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea....

Data from: Demographic response to patch destruction in a spatially structured amphibian population

Hugo Cayuela, Aurélien Besnard, Ludivine Quay, Remi Helder, Jean-Paul Léna, Pierre Joly & Julian Pichenot
1. Economic activities such as logging and mineral extraction can result in the creation of new anthropogenic habitats that host specific biodiversity, including protected species. However, the legislation in many Western European countries requires the rehabilitation of ‘damaged’ areas following logging and mining operations, which can eliminate these early successional habitats. Conservation managers face a dilemma in these situations, but often lack knowledge about the impacts of environmental rehabilitation on the population dynamics of pioneer...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in herbivore-induced plant volatiles influences the spatial range of plant-parasitoid interactions

Yavanna Aartsma, Benjamin Leroy, Wopke Van Der Werf, Marcel Dicke, Erik H. Poelman, Felix J.J.A. Bianchi & Felix J. J. A. Bianchi
Chemical information influences the behaviour of many animals, thus affecting species interactions. Many animals forage for resources that are heterogeneously distributed in space and time, and have evolved foraging behaviour that utilizes information related to these resources. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), emitted by plants upon herbivore attack, provide information on herbivory to various animal species, including parasitoids. Little is known about the spatial scale at which plants attract parasitoids via HIPVs under field conditions and...

Data from: Increased transgenerational epigenetic variation, but not predictable epigenetic variants, after environmental exposure in two apomictic dandelion lineages

Veronica Preite, Carla Oplaat, Arjen Biere, Jan Kirschner, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Koen J. F. Verhoeven
DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications. DNA methylations can be environmentally induced and such induced modifications can at times be transmitted to successive generations. However, it remains speculative how common such environmentally induced transgenerational DNA methylation changes are and if they persist for more than one offspring generation. We exposed multiple accessions of two different apomictic dandelion lineages of the Taraxacum officinale group (Taraxacum alatum and T. hemicyclum) to drought and...

Data from: Disturbance intensity is a stronger driver of biomass recovery than remaining tree-community attributes in a managed Amazonian forest

Angela L. De Avila, Masha T. Van Der Sande, Carsten F. Dormann, Marielos Peña-Claros, Lourens Poorter, Lucas Mazzei, Ademir R. Ruschel, José N. M. Silva, João O. P. De Carvalho & Jürgen Bauhus
1.Forest recovery following management interventions is important to maintain ecosystem functioning and the provision of ecosystem services. It remains, however, largely unclear how aboveground biomass (AGB) recovery of species-rich tropical forests is affected by disturbance intensity and post-disturbance (remaining) tree-community attributes, following logging and thinning interventions. 2.We investigated whether annual AGB increment (∆AGB) decreases with management-related disturbance intensity (disturbance hypothesis), and increases with the diversity (niche-complementarity hypothesis) and the community-weighted mean (CWM) of acquisitive traits...

Data from: Does wolf presence reduce moose browsing intensity in young forest plantations?

Suzanne T.S. Van Beeck Calkoen, Dries P.J. Kuijper, Hakan Sand, Navinder J. Singh, Sip E. Van Wieren, Joris P.G.M. Cromsigt, Joris P. G. M. Cromsigt, Suzanne T. S. Van Beeck Calkoen & Dries P. J. Kuijper
Large carnivores can be a key factor in shaping their ungulate prey’s behavior, which may affect lower trophic levels. While most studies on trade-offs between food acquisition and risk avoidance by ungulate prey species have been conducted in areas with limited human impact, carnivores are now increasingly returning to highly anthropogenic landscapes. Many of these landscapes are dominated by forestry, and ungulate-forestry conflicts are an increasing issue. The aim of this study was to test...

Data from: Scaling up effects of measures mitigating pollinator loss from local- to landscape-level population responses

David Kleijn, Theo E. W. Linders, Anthonie Stip, Jacobus C. Biesmeijer, Felix L. Wäckers & Tibor Bukovinszky
1. Declining pollinator populations have caused concern about consequences for food production, and have initiated an increasing number of initiatives that aim to mitigate pollinator loss through enhancement of floral resources. Studies evaluating effects of mitigation measures generally demonstrate positive responses of pollinators to floral resource enhancement. However, it remains unclear whether this represents landscape-level population effects or results from a spatial redistribution of individuals from otherwise unaffected populations. 2. Here we present a method...

Data from: Winter cover crop legacy effects on litter decomposition act through litter quality and microbial community changes

Janna M. Barel, Thomas W. Kuyper, Jos Paul, Wietse De Boer, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen & Gerlinde B. De Deyn
1. In agriculture, winter cover crop (WCC) residues are incorporated into the soil to improve soil quality, as gradual litter decomposition can improve fertility. Decomposition rate is determined by litter quality, local soil abiotic and biotic properties. However, how these factors are interlinked and influenced by cropping history is unclear. 2. We grew WCC monocultures and mixtures in rotation with main crops Avena sativa and Cichorium endivia and tested how crop rotation influences WCC litter...

Data from: Biodiversity in species, traits and structure determines carbon stocks and uptake in tropical forests

Masha T. Van Der Sande, Lourens Poorter, Lammert Kooistra, Patricia Balvanera, Kirsten Thonicke, Jill Thompson, Eric J. M. M. Arets, Nashieli Garcia Alaniz, Laurence Jones, Francisco Mora, Tuyeni H. Mwampamba, Terry Parr & Marielos Peña-Claros
Impacts of climate change require that society urgently develops ways to reduce amounts of carbon in the atmosphere. Tropical forests present an important opportunity, as they take up and store large amounts of carbon. It is often suggested that forests with high biodiversity have large stocks and high rates of carbon uptake. Evidence is, however, scattered across geographic areas and scales, and it remains unclear whether biodiversity is just a co‐benefit or also a requirement...

Data from: Unraveling the causes of adaptive benefits of synonymous mutations in TEM-1 β-lactamase

Mark P. Zwart, Martijn F. Schenk, Sungmin Hwang, Bertha Koopmanschap, Niek De Lange, Lion Van De Pol, Tran T.T. Nga, Ivan G. Szendro, Joachim Krug & J. Arjan G.M. De Visser
While synonymous mutations were long thought to be without phenotypic consequences, there is growing evidence they can affect gene expression, protein folding and ultimately the fitness of an organism. In only a few cases have the mechanisms by which synonymous mutations affect the phenotype been elucidated. We previously identified 48 mutations in TEM-1 β-lactamase that increased resistance of Escherichia coli to cefotaxime, 10 of which were synonymous. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the...

Data from: Order of herbivore arrival on wild cabbage populations influences subsequent arthropod community development

Jeltje M. Stam, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
In plant-arthropod associations, the first herbivores to colonise a plant may directly or indirectly affect community assembly on that particular plant. Whether the order of arrival of different arthropod species further modulates community assembly and affects plant fitness remains unclear. Using wild Brassica oleracea plants in the field, we manipulated the order of arrival of early-season herbivores that belong to different feeding guilds, namely the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae and caterpillars of Plutella xylostella. We investigated...

Data from: Response to short-term deprivation of the human adult visual cortex measured with 7T BOLD

Paola Binda, Jan W. Kurzawski, Claudia Lunghi, Laura Biagi, Michela Tosetti & Maria Concetta Morrone
Sensory deprivation during the post-natal "critical period" leads to structural reorganization of the developing visual cortex. In adulthood, the visual cortex retains some flexibility and adapts to sensory deprivation. Here we show that short-term (2h) monocular deprivation in adult humans boosts the BOLD response to the deprived eye, changing ocular dominance of V1 vertices, consistent with homeostatic plasticity. The boost is strongest in V1, present in V2, V3 &V4 but absent in V3a and hMT+....

Data from: Carrying a logger reduces escape flight speed in a passerine bird, but relative logger mass may be a misleading measure of this flight performance detriment

Barbara M. Tomotani, Wender Bil, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Remco P.M. Pieters, Florian T. Muijres & Remco P. M. Pieters
1. The recent boost in bird migration studies following the development of various tracking devices raised awareness of how detrimental attaching devices can be for animals. Such effects can occur during migration, but also immediately post-release if the device impairs escape flight performance and, consequently, the bird’s ability to evade predators. 2. In this study, we investigated the effect of carrying a device on the escape flight speed and aerodynamic force production in a migratory...

Data from: Slower environmental change hinders adaptation from standing genetic variation

Thiago S. Guzella, Snigdhadip Dey, Ivo M. Chelo, Ania Pino-Querido, Veronica F. Pereira, Stephen R. Proulx & Henrique Teotónio
Evolutionary responses to environmental change depend on the time available for adaptation before environmental degradation leads to extinction. Explicit tests of this relationship are limited to microbes where adaptation usually depends on the sequential fixation of de novo mutations, excluding standing variation for genotype-by-environment fitness interactions that should be key for most natural species. For most natural species evolving from standing genetic variation, adaptation at slower rates of environmental change may be impeded since the...

Data from: Insect pollination is at least as important for marketable crop yield as plant quality in a seed crop

Thijs P. M. Fijen, Jeroen A. Scheper, Timo M. Boom, Nicole Janssen, Ivo Raemakers & David Kleijn
The sustainability of agriculture can be improved by integrating management of ecosystem services, such as insect pollination, into farming practices. However, large‐scale adoption of ecosystem services‐based practices in agriculture is lacking, possibly because growers undervalue the benefits of ecosystem services compared to those of conventional management practices. Here we show that, under representative real‐world conditions, pollination and plant quality made similar contributions to marketable seed yield of hybrid leek (Allium porrum). Relative to the median,...

Data from: Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity–ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers

Annette Jesch, Kathryn E. Barry, Janneke M. Ravenek, Dörte Bachmann, Tanja Strecker, Alexandra Weigelt, Nina Buchmann, Hans De Kroon, Arthur Gessler, Liesje Mommer, Christiane Roscher & Michael Scherer-Lorenzen
1. Belowground resource partitioning is among the most prominent hypotheses for driving the positive biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship. However, experimental tests of this hypothesis in biodiversity experiments are scarce, and the available evidence is not consistent. 2. We tested the hypothesis that resource partitioning in space, in time, or in both space and time combined drives the positive effect of diversity on both plant productivity and community resource uptake. At the community level, we predicted that...

Data from: Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores

Antonino Cusumano, Feng Zhu, Anne-Nathalie Volkoff, Patrick Verbaarschot, Janneke Bloem, Heiko Vogel, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant‐associated and herbivore‐associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third‐trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that...

Data from: Quantifying in situ phenotypic variability in the hydraulic properties of four tree species across their distribution range in Europe

Sylvain Delzon, N. González-Muñoz, J. M. Torres-Ruiz, G. Capdeville, F. Sterck, P. Copini, G. Petit, G. Von Arx, A. Lintunen, L. Grönlund, T. Hölttä, M. C. Caldeira, R. Lobo-Do-Vale & M. Peltoniemi
Many studies have reported that hydraulic properties vary considerably between tree species, but little is known about their intraspecific variation and, therefore, their capacity to adapt to a warmer and drier climate. Here, we quantify phenotypic divergence and clinal variation for embolism resistance, hydraulic conductivity and branch growth, in four tree species, two angiosperms (Betula pendula, Populus tremula) and two conifers (Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris), across their latitudinal distribution in Europe. Growth and hydraulic efficiency...

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence

Ylva Lekberg, James D. Bever, Rebecca A. Bunn, Ray M. Callaway, Miranda M. Hart, Stephanie N. Kivlin, John Klironomos, Beau G. Larkin, John L. Maron, Kurt O. Reinhart, Michael Remke, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Ragan M. Callaway
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil)...

Data from: Landscape context and farm uptake limit effects of bird conservation in the Swedish Volunteer & Farmer Alliance

Jonas Josefsson, Tomas Pärt, Ake Berg, Anne Marike Lokhorst & Sönke Eggers
1. In Europe, agri-environmental schemes (AES) have been unsuccessful in halting biodiversity declines to any great extent. Two particular shortcomings of AES include the low farm uptake and the modest efficacy of many AES options. Partly in response to these shortcomings, initiatives encouraging farmers to take an active role in biodiversity conservation have gained in popularity. However, almost no evaluations of such initiatives exist. 2. We evaluated uptake of conservation advice on farms in the...

Data from: Cascading spatial and trophic impacts of oak decline on the soil food web

Jara Domínguez-Begines, Gerlinde B. De Deyn, Luis V. Garcia, Nico Eisenhauer & Lorena Gomez-Aparicio
1. Tree defoliation and mortality have considerably increased worldwide during the last decades due to global change drivers such as increasing drought or invasive pests and pathogens. However, the effects of this tree decline on soil food webs are poorly understood. 2. In this study we evaluated the impacts of Quercus suber decline on soil food webs of Mediterranean mixed forests invaded by the exotic oomycete pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi, using soil nematodes as bioindicator taxa....

Data from: Opportunistic records reveal Mediterranean reptiles’ scale‐dependent responses to anthropogenic land use

Thomas De Solan, Ian Renner, Marc Cheylan, Philippe Geniez & Jean-Yves Barnagaud
Although classified among the greatest threats to the world's biodiversity, the effects of land use and their scale dependency are left unexplored in many taxonomic groups. Reptiles are among the most data‐deficient vertebrates in this respect, although their ecological traits make them highly sensitive to habitat modifications. We tested whether land use gradients shape the distributions of Mediterranean reptiles at regional and local scales, and whether species’ ecological traits and phylogeny explain these patterns. Reptiles...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    65

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    65
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    15
  • VU University Amsterdam
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of Freiburg
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2