65 Works

Data from: Three-dimensional analysis of the fast-start escape response of the least killifish, Heterandria formosa

Mike Fleuren, Johan L. Van Leeuwen, Elsa M. Quicazan-Rubio, Remco P.M. Pieters, Bart J.A. Pollux & Cees J. Voesenek
Fish make C-starts to evade predator strikes. Double-bend (DB) C-starts consist of three stages: Stage 1, in which the fish rapidly bends into a C-shape; Stage 2, in which the fish bends in the opposite direction; and a variable Stage 3. In single-bend (SB) C-starts, the fish immediately straightens after Stage 1. Despite fish moving in 3D space, fast-start responses of adult fish have mainly been studied in a horizontal plane. Using automated 3D tracking...

Data from: Geographic isolation and larval dispersal shape seascape genetic patterns differently according to spatial scale

Alicia Dalongeville, Marco Andrello, David Mouillot, Stephane Lobreaux, Marie-Josée Fortin, Frida Lasram, Jonathan Belmaker, Delphine Rocklin & Stéphanie Manel
Genetic variation, as a basis of evolutionary change, allows species to adapt and persist in different climates and environments. Yet, a comprehensive assessment of the drivers of genetic variation at different spatial scales is still missing in marine ecosystems. Here, we investigated the influence of environment, geographic isolation, and larval dispersal on the variation in allele frequencies, using an extensive spatial sampling (47 locations) of the striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) in the Mediterranean Sea....

Data from: Demographic response to patch destruction in a spatially structured amphibian population

Hugo Cayuela, Aurélien Besnard, Ludivine Quay, Remi Helder, Jean-Paul Léna, Pierre Joly & Julian Pichenot
1. Economic activities such as logging and mineral extraction can result in the creation of new anthropogenic habitats that host specific biodiversity, including protected species. However, the legislation in many Western European countries requires the rehabilitation of ‘damaged’ areas following logging and mining operations, which can eliminate these early successional habitats. Conservation managers face a dilemma in these situations, but often lack knowledge about the impacts of environmental rehabilitation on the population dynamics of pioneer...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in herbivore-induced plant volatiles influences the spatial range of plant-parasitoid interactions

Yavanna Aartsma, Benjamin Leroy, Wopke Van Der Werf, Marcel Dicke, Erik H. Poelman, Felix J.J.A. Bianchi & Felix J. J. A. Bianchi
Chemical information influences the behaviour of many animals, thus affecting species interactions. Many animals forage for resources that are heterogeneously distributed in space and time, and have evolved foraging behaviour that utilizes information related to these resources. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), emitted by plants upon herbivore attack, provide information on herbivory to various animal species, including parasitoids. Little is known about the spatial scale at which plants attract parasitoids via HIPVs under field conditions and...

Data from: Reduction of baseline corticosterone secretion correlates with climate warming and drying across wild lizard populations

Andréaz Dupoué, Alexis Rutschmann, Jean F. Le Galliard, Jean Clobert, Pauline Blaimont, Barry Sinervo, Donald B. Miles, Claudy Haussy & Sandrine Meylan
1. Climate change should lead to massive loss of biodiversity in most taxa but the detailed physiological mechanisms underlying population extinction remain largely elusive so far. In vertebrates, baseline levels of hormones such as glucocorticoids (GCs) may be indicators of population state since their secretion to chronic stress can impair survival and reproduction. However, the relationship between GC secretion, climate change and population extinction risk remains unclear. 2. In this study we investigated whether levels...

Data from: Maternal size and body condition predict the amount of post-fertilization maternal provisioning in matrotrophic fish

Andres Hagmayer, Andrew I. Furness, David N. Reznick & Bart J. A. Pollux
Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for such environmentally-induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits. Here we study potential effects of the maternal phenotype on offspring provisioning prior to and during gestation in the matrotrophic live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna. Specifically, we examine how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass and length relate to...

Data from: Selection for associative learning of color stimuli reveals correlated evolution of this learning ability across multiple stimuli and rewards.

Maartje Liefting, Katja M. Hoedjes, Cécile Le Lann, Hans M. Smid & Jacintha Ellers
We are only starting to understand how variation in cognitive ability can result from local adaptations to environmental conditions. A major question in this regard is to what extent selection on cognitive ability in a specific context affects that ability in general through correlated evolution. To address this question we performed artificial selection on visual associative learning in female Nasonia vitripennis wasps. Using appetitive conditioning in which a visual stimulus was offered in association with...

Data from: Mapping the imprint of biotic interactions on β-diversity

Marc Ohlmann, Florent Mazel, Loïc Chalmandrier, Stéphane Bec, Eric Coissac, Ludovic Gielly, Johan Pansu, Vincent Schilling, Pierre Taberlet, Lucie Zinger, Jerome Chave & Wilfried Thuiller
Investigating how trophic interactions influence the β-diversity of meta-communities is of paramount importance to understanding the processes shaping biodiversity distribution. Here, we apply a statistical method for inferring the strength of spatial dependencies between pairs of species groups. Using simulated community data generated from a multi-trophic model, we showed that this method can approximate biotic interactions in multi-trophic communities based on β-diversity patterns across groups. When applied to soil multi-trophic communities along an elevational gradient...

Data from: Rapid divergence of mussel populations despite incomplete barriers to dispersal

Diede L. Maas, Stefan Prost, Ke Bi, Lydia L. Smith, Ellie E. Armstrong, Ludi P. Aji, Abdul H.A. Toha, Rosemary G. Gillespie & Leontine E. Becking
Striking genetic structure among marine populations at small spatial scales is becoming evident with extensive molecular studies. Such observations suggest isolation at small scales may play an important role in forming patterns of genetic diversity within species. Isolation-by-distance, isolation-by-environment, and historical priority effects are umbrella terms for a suite of processes that underlie genetic structure, but their relative importance at different spatial and temporal scales remains elusive. Here, we use marine lakes in Indonesia to...

Data from: Estimating sensitivity of seabed habitats to disturbance by bottom trawling based on the longevity of benthic fauna

Adriaan D. Rijnsdorp, Stefan G. Bolam, Clement Garcia, Jan Geert Hiddink, Niels T. Hintzen, P. Daniel Van Denderen & Tobias Van Kooten
Bottom fishing such as trawling and dredging may pose serious risks to the seabed and benthic habitats, calling for a quantitative assessment method to evaluate the impact and guide management to develop mitigation measures. We provide a method to estimate the sensitivity of benthic habitats based on the longevity composition of the invertebrate community. We hypothesize that long-lived species are more sensitive to trawling mortality due to their lower pace of life (i.e. slower growth,...

Data from: Multiple infections, relatedness and virulence in the anther-smut fungus castrating Saponaria plants

Taiadjana M. Fortuna, Alice Namias, Alodie Snirc, Antoine Branca, Michael E. Hood, Christian Raquin, Jacqui A. Shykoff & Tatiana Giraud
Multiple infections (co-occurrence of multiple pathogen genotypes within an individual host) can have important impacts on diseases. Relatedness among pathogens can affect the likelihood of multiple infections and their consequences through kin selection. Previous studies on the castrating anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae have shown that multiple infections occur in its host plant Silene latifolia. Relatedness was high among fungal genotypes within plants, which could result from competitive exclusion between unrelated fungal genotypes, from population structure...

Data from: Integrating quantitative morphological and qualitative molecular methods to analyze soil nematode community responses to plant range expansion

Stefan Geisen, L. Basten Snoek, Freddy C. Ten Hooven, Henk Duyts, Olga Kostenko, Janneke Bloem, Henk Martens, Casper W. Quist, Johannes A. Helder & Wim H. Van Der Putten
1. Belowground nematodes are important for soil functioning, as they are ubiquitous and operate at various trophic levels in the soil food web. However, morphological nematode community analysis is time consuming and requires ample training. qPCR-based nematode identification techniques are well available, but high throughput sequencing (HTS) might be more suitable for non-targeted nematode community analysis. 2. We compared effectiveness of qPCR and HTS-based approaches with morphological nematode identification while examining how climate warming-induced plant...

Data from: A high density SNP chip for genotyping great tit (Parus major) populations and its application to studying the genetic architecture of exploration behaviour

Jun-Mo Kim, Anna W. Santure, Henry J. Barton, John L. Quinn, Eleanor F. Cole, Marcel E. Visser, Ben C. Sheldon, Martien A.M. Groenen, Kees Van Oers, Jon Slate & J.-M. Kim
High density SNP microarrays (‘SNP chips’) are a rapid, accurate and efficient method for genotyping several hundred thousand polymorphisms in large numbers of individuals. While SNP chips are routinely used in human genetics and in animal and plant breeding, they are less widely used in evolutionary and ecological research. In this paper we describe the development and application of a high density Affymetrix Axiom chip with around 500 000 SNPs, designed to perform genomics studies...

Data from: Modelling mobile agent-based ecosystem services using kernel weighted predictors

Paul W. Goedhart, Marjolein E. Lof, Felix J.J.A. Bianchi, Hans J. M. Baveco, Wopke Van Der Werf & Felix J. J. A. Bianchi
1. Agriculture benefits from ecosystem services provided by mobile agents, such as biological pest control by natural enemies and pollination by bees. However, methods that can generate spatially explicit predictions and maps of these ecosystem services based on empirical data are still scarce. 2. Here we propose a generic statistical model to derive kernel functions to characterize the spatial distribution of ecosystem services provided by mobile agents. The model is similar in spirit to a...

Data from: The effects of recent changes in breeding preferences on maintaining traditional Dutch chicken genomic diversity

Chiara Bortoluzzi, Richard P.M.A. Crooijmans, Mirte Bosse, Sipke Joost Hiemstra, Martien A.M. Groenen & Hendrik-Jan Megens
Traditional Dutch chicken breeds are marginalised breeds of ornamental and cultural-historical importance. In the last decades, miniaturising of existing breeds (so called neo-bantam) has become popular and resulted in alternatives to original large breeds. However, while backcrossing is increasing the neo-bantams homozygosity, genetic exchange between breeders may increase their genetic diversity. We use the 60K SNP array to characterise the genetic diversity, demographic history, and level of inbreeding of Dutch heritage breeds, and particularly of...

Data from: Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in a long-term non-weeded field experiment

Ciska G.F. Veen, Wim Van Der Putten, T. Martijn Bezemer, Wim H. Van Der Putten & G. F. Veen
Many grassland biodiversity experiments show a positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, in most these experiments plant communities are established by sowing and natural colonization is prevented by selective weeding of non-sown species. During ecosystem restoration, for example on abandoned fields, plant communities start on bare soil, and diversity is often manipulated in a single sowing event. How such initial plant diversity manipulations influence plant biodiversity development and ecosystem functioning is not well...

Data from: Nematode community responses to range-expanding and native plant communities in original and new range soils

Rutger A. Wilschut, Olga Kostenko, Kadri Koorem & Wim H. Van Der Putten
Many plant species expand their range to higher latitudes in response to climate change. However, it is poorly understood how biotic interactions in the new range differ from interactions in the original range. Here, in a mesocosm experiment, we analyze nematode community responses in original and new range soils to plant communities with either 1) species native in both the original and new range, 2) range-expanding species related to these natives (related range-expanders), or 3)...

Data from: Relationships between leaf mass per area and nutrient concentrations in 98 Mediterranean woody species are determined by phylogeny, habitat and leaf habit

Enrique G. De La Riva, Rafael Villar, Ignacio M. Pérez-Ramos, José Luis Quero, Luis Matías, Lourens Poorter & Teodoro Marañón
Leaf structural and nutrient traits are key attributes of plant ecological strategies, as these traits are related to resource-use strategies and plant growth. However, leaf structure and nutrient composition can vary among different habitats, leaf habits or phylogenetic groups. In this study, we measured 13 leaf traits (one structural—leaf mass per area, LMA—and 12 nutrient traits) in 98 Mediterranean woody species growing over a wide range of environmental conditions, with the final aim of discerning...

Data from: Food and nutrient gaps in rural Northern Ghana: does production of smallholder farming households support adoption of food-based dietary guidelines?

Ilse De Jager, Ken E. Giller & Inge D. Brouwer
Food-based dietary guidelines (FBDGs) provide guidance to policy makers, the private sector and consumers to redesign food systems and to improve diets of vulnerable populations. As appropriate FBDGs are based on the actual dietary patterns and their costs, it is assumed that the recommended foods are available, affordable and acceptable for the population under study. Using quantitative dietary intake data of young children in rural Northern Ghana, we developed local FBDGs and studied whether these...

Data from: Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores

Antonino Cusumano, Feng Zhu, Anne-Nathalie Volkoff, Patrick Verbaarschot, Janneke Bloem, Heiko Vogel, Marcel Dicke & Erik H. Poelman
Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant‐associated and herbivore‐associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third‐trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that...

Data from: Reanalyzing the Palaeoptera problem - the origin of insect flight remains obscure

Sabrina Simon, Alexander Blanke & Karen Meusemann
The phylogenetic relationships of the winged insect lineages – mayflies (Ephemeroptera), damselflies and dragonflies (Odonata), and all other winged insects (Neoptera) – are still controversial with three hypotheses supported by different datasets: Palaeoptera, Metapterygota and Chiastomyaria. Here, we reanalyze available phylogenomic data with a focus on detecting confounding and alternative signal. In this context, we provide a framework to quantitatively evaluate and assess incongruent molecular phylogenetic signal inherent in phylogenomic datasets. Despite overall support for...

Data from: Opportunistic records reveal Mediterranean reptiles’ scale‐dependent responses to anthropogenic land use

Thomas De Solan, Ian Renner, Marc Cheylan, Philippe Geniez & Jean-Yves Barnagaud
Although classified among the greatest threats to the world's biodiversity, the effects of land use and their scale dependency are left unexplored in many taxonomic groups. Reptiles are among the most data‐deficient vertebrates in this respect, although their ecological traits make them highly sensitive to habitat modifications. We tested whether land use gradients shape the distributions of Mediterranean reptiles at regional and local scales, and whether species’ ecological traits and phylogeny explain these patterns. Reptiles...

Data from: Brassicales phylogeny inferred from 72 plastid genes: a reanalysis of the phylogenetic localization of two paleopolyploid events and origin of novel chemical defenses

Patrick P. Edger, Jocelyn C. Hall, Alex Harkess, Michelle Tang, Jill Coombs, Setareh Mohammadin, M. Eric Schranz, Zhiyong Xiong, James Leebens-Mack, Blake C. Meyers, Kenneth J. Systma, Marcus A. Koch, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, J. Chris Pires & Kenneth J. Sytsma
PREMISE OF THE STUDY - Previous phylogenetic studies employing molecular markers have yielded various insights into the evolutionary history across Brassicales, but many relationships between families remain poorly supported or unresolved. A recent phylotranscriptomic approach utilizing 1155 nuclear markers obtained robust estimates for relationships among 14 of 17 families. Here we report a complete family‐level phylogeny estimated using the plastid genome. METHODS - We conducted phylogenetic analyses on a concatenated data set comprising 44,926 bp...

Data from: Opposing patterns of intraspecific and interspecific differentiation in sex chromosomes and autosomes

Peter A. Moran, Sonia Pascoal, Timothée Cezard, Judith E. Risse, Michael G. Ritchie & Nathan W. Bailey
Linking intraspecific and interspecific divergence is an important challenge in speciation research. X chromosomes are expected to evolve faster than autosomes and disproportionately contribute to reproductive barriers, and comparing genetic variation on X and autosomal markers within and between species can elucidate evolutionary processes that shape genome variation. We performed RADseq on a 16-population transect of two closely-related Australian cricket species, Teleogryllus commodus and T. oceanicus, covering allopatry and sympatry. This classic study system for...

Data from: Predicting genotypes environmental range from genome-environment associations

Stéphanie Manel, Marco Andrello, Karine Henry, Daphné Verdelet, Aude Darracq, Pierre-Edouard Guerin, Bruno Desprez & Pierre Devaux
Genome-environment association methods aim to detect genetic markers associated with environmental variables. The detected associations are usually analysed separately to identify the genomic regions involved in local adaptation. However, a recent study suggests that single-locus associations can be combined and used in a predictive way to estimate environmental variables for new individuals on the basis of their genotypes. Here, we introduce an original approach to predict the environmental range (values and upper and lower limits)...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    65

Affiliations

  • Wageningen University & Research
    65
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    15
  • VU University Amsterdam
    4
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    4
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of Freiburg
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    3
  • University of Padua
    2
  • Bangor University
    2
  • Stanford University
    2