5 Works

Data from: The evolution of feather coloration and song in Old World orioles (genus Oriolus)

Beata Matysiokova, Nicholas Friedman, Lucia Turčoková & Vladimir Remes
What is the tempo and mode of evolution – how fast and in what pattern do traits evolve – is a major question of evolutionary biology. Here we studied patterns of evolutionary change in visual and acoustic signals in Old World orioles. Since producing multiple signals may be costly, we also tested whether there was an evolutionary trade-off between the elaboration of those two types of signals. We studied 30 Oriolus taxa using comparative methods...

Data from: Smaller beaks for colder winters: Thermoregulation drives beak size evolution in Australasian songbirds

Nicholas R. Friedman, Lenka Harmáčková, Evan P. Economo & Vladimir Remes
Birds’ beaks play a key role in foraging, and most research on their size and shape has focused on this function. Recent findings suggest that beaks may also be important for thermoregulation, and this may drive morphological evolution as predicted by Allen's rule. However, the role of thermoregulation in the evolution of beak size across species remains largely unexplored. In particular, it remains unclear whether the need for retaining heat in the winter or dissipating...

Data from: Broad-scale variation in sexual dichromatism in songbirds is not explained by sex differences in exposure to predators during incubation

Beata Matysiokova, Vladimir Remes & Andrew Cockburn
The evolution of sexual dichromatism provoked one of the greatest disagreements between Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. According to Darwin the main driving force is sexual selection, whereby choosy females prefer showy males, leading to the evolution of conspicuous male plumage. On the other hand, Wallace suggested that dichromatism may arise because nest predation favors more cryptic females. To test the role of natural selection in the evolution of dichromatism we combined quantitative data...

Data from: Suppressing competitive dominants and community restoration with native parasitic plants using the hemiparasitic Rhinanthus alectorolophus and the dominant grass Calamagrostis epigejos

Jakub Těšitel, Jan Mladek, Jan Horník, Tamara Těšitelová, Vojtěch Adamec & Lubomír Tichý
1. Dominance of native or alien competitive plants causes competitive exclusion of subordinate species and represents a major mechanism reducing biodiversity following land-use changes. The successful competitive strategies may however be interfered with by parasitic plants, which withdraw resources from other plants’ vasculature. Parasitism may strongly reduce the growth of the dominants, which may facilitate regeneration of other species and consequently trigger restoration of natural communities of high diversity. 2. Here, we aim to provide...

Data from: Egg discrimination along a gradient of natural variation in eggshell coloration

Daniel Hanley, Tomas Grim, Branislav Igic, Peter Samaš, Analía V. López, Matthew D. Shawkey & Mark E. Hauber
Accurate recognition of salient cues is critical for adaptive responses, but the underlying sensory and cognitive processes are often poorly understood. For example, hosts of avian brood parasites have long been assumed to reject foreign eggs from their nests based on the total degree of dissimilarity in colour to their own eggs, regardless of the foreign eggs' colours. We tested hosts' responses to gradients of natural (blue-green to brown) and artificial (green to purple) egg...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Palacký University, Olomouc
    5
  • Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology
    2
  • Hunter College
    1
  • University of California System
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  • Australian National University
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  • Masaryk University
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  • University of Akron
    1
  • Long Island University
    1
  • University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice
    1
  • Comenius University
    1