4 Works

Data from: Interacting effects of wildlife loss and climate on ticks and tick-borne disease

Georgia Titcomb, Brian F. Allan, Tyler Ainsworth, Henson Lauren, Tyler Hedlund, Robert M. Pringle, Todd M. Palmer, Laban Njoroge, Michael G. Campana, Robert C. Fleischer, John Naisikie Mantas, Hillary S. Young & Lauren Henson
Both large-wildlife loss and climatic changes can independently influence the prevalence and distribution of zoonotic disease. Given growing evidence that wildlife loss often has stronger community-level effects in low-productivity areas, we hypothesized that these perturbations would have interactive effects on disease risk. We experimentally tested this hypothesis by measuring tick abundance and the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens (Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia spp.) within long-term, size-selective, large-herbivore exclosures replicated across a precipitation gradient in East Africa....

Data from: Demographic drivers of a refugee species: large-scale experiments guide strategies for reintroductions of hirola

Abdullahi H. Ali, Matthew J. Kauffman, Rajan Amin, Amos Kibara, Juliet King, David Mallon, Charles Musyoki & Jacob R. Goheen
Effective reintroduction strategies require accurate estimates of vital rates and the factors that influence them. We estimated vital rates of hirola (Beatragus hunteri) populations exposed to varying levels of predation and rangeland quality from 2012 to 2015, and then built population matrices to estimate the finite rate of population change (λ) and demographic sensitivities. Mean survival for all age classes and population growth was highest in the low predation/high-rangeland quality setting (λ = 1.08 ±...

Data from: Ovarian cycling and reproductive state shape the vaginal microbiota in wild baboons

Elizabeth A. Miller, Joshua A. Livermore, Susan C. Alberts, Jenny Tung & Elizabeth A. Archie
Background: The vaginal microbiome is an important site of bacterial-mammalian symbiosis. This symbiosis is currently best characterized for humans, where lactobacilli dominate the microbial community and may help defend women against infectious disease. However, lactobacilli do not dominate the vaginal microbiota of any other mammal studied to date, raising key questions about the forces that shape the vaginal microbiome in non-human mammals. Results: We used Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene to investigate...

Data from: Costs of immunity and their role in the range expansion of the house sparrow in Kenya

Lynn B. Martin, Holly J. Kilvitis, Amber J. Brace, Laken Cooper, Mark F. Haussmann, Alex Mutati, Vincent Fasanello, Sara O'Brien & Daniel R. Ardia
There are at least two reasons to study traits that mediate successful range expansions. First, dispersers will found new populations and thus impact the distribution and evolution of species. Second, organisms moving into new areas will influence the fate of resident communities, directly competing with or indirectly affecting residents by spreading non-native or spilling-back native parasites. The success of invaders in new areas is likely mediated by a counterbalancing of costly traits. In new areas...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • National Museums of Kenya
    4
  • Bucknell University
    1
  • Princeton University
    1
  • University of Notre Dame
    1
  • University of Wyoming
    1
  • Kenya Wildlife Service
    1
  • Manchester Metropolitan University
    1
  • University of California, Santa Barbara
    1
  • University of Florida
    1
  • University of South Florida
    1