381 Works

Data from: AgMate: an optimal mating software versus other mate pair designing methods on long-term breeding of Pinus taeda L

Khushi Goda & Fikret Isik
Breeding objectives aim to optimize two crucial but contrasting goals of maximizing genetic gain while managing genetic diversity. In advanced generations, this becomes a challenge in monoecious conifer tree species breeding programs because they suffer from inbreeding. Developing an algorithm that maximizes genetic gain while maintaining genetic diversity for monoecious species is imperative. While methods and algorithms for animal breeding are well-established, an efficient algorithm suited to monoecious species remains elusive. Towards this goal, we...

Spine and dine: A key defensive trait promotes ecological success in spiny ants

Benjamin Blanchard, Akihiro Nakamura, Min Cao, Stephanie Chen & Corrie Moreau
A key focus of ecologists is explaining the origin and maintenance of morphological diversity and its association with ecological success. We investigate potential benefits and costs of a common and varied morphological trait, cuticular spines, for foraging behavior, interspecific competition, and predator-prey interactions in naturally co-occurring spiny ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Polyrhachis) in an experimental setting. We expect that a defensive trait like spines might be associated with more conspicuous foraging, a greater number of workers...

Copper and zinc generated by the Aquascape IonGen pond clarifier system can be detrimental to koi (Cyprinus carpio) health

Emily Tucker, Jamie Gerlach, Azais Curtean, Kent Passingham, Lisa Murphy & Gregory Lewbart
BackgroundCopper is frequently used as an algicide, and copper ion generators such as the Aquascape IonGen claim to be safe for use in systems containing fish. In 2012, a die-off of koi (Cyprinus carpio) in a pond in Raleigh, North Carolina, occurred after the IonGen was added to the system.MethodsPhysical and postmortem examinations suggested that heavy metal toxicity was the likely cause of morbidity and mortality. This was supported by a heavy metal screening of...

The magnitude of large-scale tree mortality caused by the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

Richard Cobb, Sarah Haas, Nicholas Kruskamp, Whalen Dillon, Tedmund Swiecki, David Rizzo, Susan Frankel & Ross Meentemeyer
Forest pathogens are important drivers of tree mortality across the globe but it is exceptionally challenging to gather and build unbiased quantitative models of their impacts, which has resulted in few estimates matching the scale of disease. Here we harness the rare dataset matching the spatial scale of pathogen invasion, host, and disease heterogeneity to estimate infection and mortality for the four most susceptible host species of Phytophthora ramorum, an invasive pathogen that drives the...

Effects of an alternative host on the prevalence and infection intensity of a bumble bee parasite

Rebecca Irwin & Simon Pinilla-Gallego
Several bee parasites are transmitted through flowers, and some of them can infect multiple host species. Given the shared use of flowers by bee species, parasites can potentially encounter multiple host species, which could affect the evolution of parasite virulence. We used the trypanosomatid parasite Crithidia bombi and its host, the common eastern bumble bee (Bombus impatiens), to explore the effect of infecting an alternative host, the alfalfa leaf-cutter bee (Megachile rotundata), on parasite infectivity...

Life-history stage and the population genetics of the tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus at a fine spatial scale

Emily Reed, Michael Reiskind & Martha Burford Reiskind
As a widespread vector of disease, the mosquito species Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) is a high priority for both public health and invasive species research and management. Like all mosquitoes, A. albopictus has a complex life history with aquatic egg, larval, and pupal stages and a terrestrial adult stage. This requires targeted management strategies for each life stage, coordinated across time and space. Researchers use population genetics to inform control of A. albopictus. However,...

Floral shape predicts bee-parasite transmission potential

Rebecca Irwin, Mario Pinilla-Gallego, Wee-Hao Ng & Victoria Amaral
The spread of parasites is one of the primary drivers of population decline of both managed and wild bees. Several bee parasites are transmitted by the shared use of flowers, turning floral resources into potential disease hotspots. However, we know little about how floral morphology and floral species identity affect different steps of the transmission process. Here, we used the gut parasite Crithidia bombi and its primary host, bumble bees (Bombus spp.), to examine whether...

Probing the molecular basis of fruit firmness in southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrid) through RNA sequencing

Lena Wilson & Hamid Ashrafi
Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) benefit from increased fruit firmness because of consumer preference and machine harvestability. However, the genetic component of fruit texture and skin thickness and their relationship to firmness have yet to be deciphered. This study used bulked segregant RNA-seq (BSR-seq) for differential gene expression analysis. Previously an F1 population of a cross between firm-fruited southern highbush cv. 'Reveille' and soft-fruited cv. 'Arlen' was developed in our laboratory. The total RNA of the...

Data from: Extremophile Poeciliidae: multivariate insights into the complexity of speciation along replicated ecological gradients

Rüdiger Riesch, Michael Tobler, Hannes Lerp, Jonas Jourdan, Tess Doumas, Patrik Nosil, R. Brian Langerhans & Martin Plath
Background: Replicate population pairs that diverge in response to similar selective regimes allow for an investigation of (a) whether phenotypic traits diverge in a similar and predictable fashion, (b) whether there is gradual variation in phenotypic divergence reflecting variation in the strength of natural selection among populations, (c) whether the extent of this divergence is correlated between multiple character suites (i.e., concerted evolution), and (d) whether gradual variation in phenotypic divergence predicts the degree of...

Data from: Preference for conspecifics evolves earlier in males than females in a sexually dimorphic radiation of fishes

Tamra C. Mendelson, Jennifer M. Gumm, Michael D. Martin & Patrick J. Ciccotto
Speciation by sexual selection is generally modeled as the co-evolution of female preferences and elaborate male ornaments leading to behavioral (sexual) reproductive isolation. One prediction of these models is that female preference for conspecific males should evolve earlier than male preference for conspecific females in sexually dimorphic species with male ornaments. We tested that prediction in darters, a diverse group of freshwater fishes with sexually dimorphic ornamentation. Focusing on the earliest stages of divergence, we...

Data from: Genomics meets applied ecology: characterizing habitat quality for sloths in a tropical agroecosystem

Emily D. Fountain, Jung Koo Kang, Douglas J. Tempel, Per J. Palsbøll, Jonathan N. Pauli & M. Zachariah Peery
Understanding how habitat quality in heterogeneous landscapes governs the distribution and fitness of individuals is a fundamental aspect of ecology. While mean individual fitness is generally considered a key to assessing habitat quality, a comprehensive understanding of habitat quality in heterogeneous landscapes requires estimates of dispersal rates among habitat types. The increasing accessibility of genomic approaches, combined with field-based demographic methods, provides novel opportunities for incorporating dispersal estimation into assessments of habitat quality. In this...

Data from: Host association drives significant genetic divergence in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius

Warren Booth, Ondřej Balvín, Edward L. Vargo, Jitka Vilímová & Coby Schal
Genetic differentiation may exist among sympatric populations of a species due to long-term associations with alternative hosts (i.e., host-associated differentiation). While host-associated differentiation has been documented in several phytophagus insects, there are far fewer cases known in animal parasites. The bed bug, Cimex lectularius, a wingless insect, represents a potential model organism for elucidating the processes involved in host-associated differentiation in animal parasites with relatively limited mobility. In conjunction with the expansion of modern humans...

Data from: Public questions spur the discovery of new bacterial species associated with lignin bioconversion of industrial waste

Stephanie L. Mathews, Mary J. Epps, Robert K. Blackburn, Michael B. Goshe, Amy M. Grunden & Robert R. Dunn
A citizen science project found that the greenhouse camel cricket (Diestrammena asynamora) is common in North American homes. Public response was to wonder “what good are they anyway?” and ecology and evolution guided the search for potential benefit. We predicted that camel crickets and similar household species would likely host bacteria with the ability to degrade recalcitrant carbon compounds. Lignocellulose is particularly relevant as it is difficult to degrade yet is an important feedstock for...

Data from: Rare frost events reinforce tropical savanna-forest boundaries

William A. Hoffmann, Samuel W. Flake, Rodolfo C.R. Abreu, Natashi A.L. Pilon, Davi R. Rossatto, Giselda Durigan & Rodolfo C. R. Abreu
1) The ability of vegetation to ameliorate or exacerbate environmental extremes can generate feedbacks that mediate the distribution of biomes. It has been suggested that feedbacks between vegetation and frost damage may be important for maintaining savanna, particularly at the edge of the tropics. 2) We quantified frost damage and air temperature across a network of 30 permanent plots distributed across tropical savanna-forest boundaries in Brazil during an uncommonly hard frost. 3) Tree cover strongly...

Data from: Sequence data for Clostridium autoethanogenum using three generations of sequencing technologies

Sagar M. Utturkar, Dawn M. Klingeman, José M. Bruno-Barcena, Mari S. Chinn, Amy M. Grunden, Michael Köpke & Steven D. Brown
During the past decade, DNA sequencing output has been mostly dominated by the second generation sequencing platforms which are characterized by low cost, high throughput and shorter read lengths for example, Illumina. The emergence and development of so called third generation sequencing platforms such as PacBio has permitted exceptionally long reads (over 20 kb) to be generated. Due to read length increases, algorithm improvements and hybrid assembly approaches, the concept of one chromosome, one contig...

Data from: Plasticity of plant defense and its evolutionary implications in wild populations of Boechera stricta

Maggie R. Wagner & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Phenotypic plasticity is thought to impact evolutionary trajectories by shifting trait values in a direction that is either favored by natural selection (“adaptive plasticity”) or disfavored (“nonadaptive” plasticity). However, it is unclear how commonly each of these types of plasticity occurs in natural populations. To answer this question, we measured glucosinolate defensive chemistry and reproductive fitness in over 1,500 individuals of the wild perennial mustard Boechera stricta, planted in four common gardens across central Idaho,...

Data from: Best practices for justifying fossil calibrations

James F. Parham, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Christopher J. Bell, Tyler D. Calway, Jason J. Head, Patricia A. Holroyd, Jun G. Inoue, Randall B. Irmis, Walter G. Joyce, Daniel T. Ksepka, José S. L. Patané, Nathan D. Smith, James E. Tarver, Marcel Van Tuinen, Ziheng Yang, Kenneth D. Angielczyk, Jenny M. Greenwood, Christy A. Hipsley, Jacobs Louis, Peter J. Makovicky, Johannes Müller, Krister T. Smith, Jessica M. Theodor, Rachel C. M. Warnock, Michael J. Benton … & Louis Jacobs
Our ability to correlate biological evolution with climate change, geological evolution, and other historical patterns is essential to understanding the processes that shape biodiversity. Combining data from the fossil record with molecular phylogenetics represents an exciting synthetic approach to this challenge. The first molecular divergence dating analysis (Zuckerkandl and Pauling 1962) was based on a measure of the amino acid differences in the hemoglobin molecule; with replacement rates established (calibrated) using inaccurate paleontological age estimates...

Data from: Evidence that Egfr contributes to cryptic genetic variation for photoreceptor determination in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Ian Dworkin, Arnar Palsson, Kelli Birdsall & Greg Gibson
One objective of quantitative genetics is to identify the nucleotide variants within genes that contribute to phenotypic variation and susceptibility [1]. In an evolutionary context, this means characterizing the molecular polymorphisms that modify the penetrance and expressivity of perturbed traits. A survey of association between 267 SNPs in almost 11 kb of the D. melanogaster Egfr and the degree of eye roughening due to a gain-of-function EgfrE1 allele crossed into 210 isogenic wild-type lines provides...

Data from: Size, sex, and individual-level behavior drive intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging of a top-predator

James C. Nifong, Craig A. Layman & Brian R. Silliman
1. Large-bodied, top-predators are often highly mobile, with the potential to provide important linkages between spatially distinct food webs. What biological factors contribute to variation in cross-ecosystem movements, however, have rarely been examined. 2. Here, we investigated how ontogeny (body size), sex, and individual-level behavior impacts intra-population variation in cross-ecosystem foraging (i.e., between freshwater and marine systems), by the top-predator Alligator mississippiensis. 3. Field surveys revealed A. mississippiensis uses marine ecosystems regularly and are abundant...

Data from: Wing patterning gene redefines the mimetic history of Heliconius butterflies

Heather M. Hines, Brian A. Counterman, Riccardo Papa, Priscila Albuquerque De Moura, Marcio Z. Cardoso, Mauricio Linares, James Mallet, Robert D. Reed, Chris D. Jiggins, Marcus R. Kronforst & W. Owen McMillan
The mimetic butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene have undergone parallel radiations to form a near-identical patchwork of over 20 different wing pattern races across the Neotropics. Previous molecular phylogenetic work on these radiations has suggested that similar but geographically disjunct color patterns arose multiple times independently in each species. The neutral markers used in these studies, however, can move freely across color pattern boundaries and therefore might not represent the history of the adaptive...

Data from: Contemporary evolution of plant growth rate following experimental removal of herbivores

Nash E. Turley, Walter C. Odell, Hanno Schaefer, Georg Everwand, Michael J. Crawley & Marc T. J. Johnson
Herbivores are credited with driving the evolutionary diversification of plant defensive strategies over macroevolutionary time. For this to be true, herbivores must also cause short-term evolution within plant populations, but few studies have experimentally tested this prediction. We addressed this gap using a long-term manipulative field experiment where exclosures protected 22 plant populations from natural rabbit herbivory for <1 to 26 years. We collected seeds of Rumex acetosa L. (Polygonaceae) from our plots and grew...

Data from: Natural selection and repeated patterns of molecular evolution following allopatric divergence

Yibo Dong, Shichao Chen, Shifeng Cheng, Wenbin Zhou, Qing Ma, Zhiduan Chen, Cheng-Xin Fu, Xin Liu, Yun-Peng Zhao, Pamela S. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Douglas E. Soltis & Jenny Xiang
Background: Geographic speciation is a major force in generating biodiversity. However, how genomes diverge over time after geographic isolation has halted gene flow has remained unclear. We examine genome-wide divergence of putatively single-copy orthologous genes (POGs) from transcriptomes in 20 allopatric species/variety pairs from diverse angiosperm clades. Sixteen of these pairs reflect the well-known eastern Asia – eastern North America floristic disjunction; these species have been isolated for different lengths of time, from the Miocene...

Data from: Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture using ancestry-informative diagnostic SNPs

Javier Monzón, Roland Kays & Daniel E. Dykhuizen
The evolutionary importance of hybridization as a source of new adaptive genetic variation is rapidly gaining recognition. Hybridization between coyotes and wolves may have introduced adaptive alleles into the coyote gene pool that facilitated an expansion in their geographic range and dietary niche. Furthermore, hybridization between coyotes and domestic dogs may facilitate adaptation to human-dominated environments. We genotyped 63 ancestry-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms in 427 canids in order to examine the prevalence, spatial distribution, and...

Supplementary information for: Using networks to identify structure in phylogenetic tree sets

Jeremy Brown, Melissa Marchand, Wen Huang, Guifang Zhou, Genevieve Mount, Jeremy Ash, Kyle Gallivan & James Wilgenbusch
Modern phylogenomic studies produce large sets of trees that can represent variation in inferred phylogenies across genes, uncertainty in estimated phylogenies for a given gene, or both. Standard practice is to condense this variation down to a small set of point estimates or consensus trees in order to facilitate display and interpretation. However, doing so results in the loss of enormous amounts of information about the structure of the underlying tree set. Here, we propose...

Detecting flying insects using car nets and DNA metabarcoding

Cecilie Svenningsen, Tobias Guldberg Frøslev, Jesper Bladt, Lene Bruhn Pedersen, Jonas Colling Larsen, Rasmus Ejrnæs, Camilla Fløjgaard, Anders Hansen, Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Robert Dunn & Anders Tøttrup
Monitoring insects across space and time is challenging, due to their vast taxonomic and functional diversity. This study demonstrates how nets mounted on rooftops of cars (car nets) and DNA metabarcoding can be applied to sample flying insect richness and diversity across large spatial scales within a limited time period. During June 2018, 365 car net samples were collected by 151 volunteers during two daily time intervals on 218 routes in Denmark. Insect bulk samples...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    45
  • 2021
    44
  • 2020
    54
  • 2019
    21
  • 2018
    41
  • 2017
    28
  • 2016
    25
  • 2015
    36
  • 2014
    18
  • 2013
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    381

Affiliations

  • North Carolina State University
    381
  • Duke University
    22
  • University of Florida
    16
  • Pennsylvania State University
    13
  • Cornell University
    13
  • North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
    11
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    11
  • University of California, Davis
    11
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    10
  • Michigan State University
    10