369 Works

Data from: Assessment of coyote-wolf-dog admixture using ancestry-informative diagnostic SNPs

Javier Monzón, Roland Kays & Daniel E. Dykhuizen
The evolutionary importance of hybridization as a source of new adaptive genetic variation is rapidly gaining recognition. Hybridization between coyotes and wolves may have introduced adaptive alleles into the coyote gene pool that facilitated an expansion in their geographic range and dietary niche. Furthermore, hybridization between coyotes and domestic dogs may facilitate adaptation to human-dominated environments. We genotyped 63 ancestry-informative single nucleotide polymorphisms in 427 canids in order to examine the prevalence, spatial distribution, and...

Supplementary information for: Using networks to identify structure in phylogenetic tree sets

Jeremy Brown, Melissa Marchand, Wen Huang, Guifang Zhou, Genevieve Mount, Jeremy Ash, Kyle Gallivan & James Wilgenbusch
Modern phylogenomic studies produce large sets of trees that can represent variation in inferred phylogenies across genes, uncertainty in estimated phylogenies for a given gene, or both. Standard practice is to condense this variation down to a small set of point estimates or consensus trees in order to facilitate display and interpretation. However, doing so results in the loss of enormous amounts of information about the structure of the underlying tree set. Here, we propose...

Detecting flying insects using car nets and DNA metabarcoding

Cecilie Svenningsen, Tobias Guldberg Frøslev, Jesper Bladt, Lene Bruhn Pedersen, Jonas Colling Larsen, Rasmus Ejrnæs, Camilla Fløjgaard, Anders Hansen, Jacob Heilmann-Clausen, Robert Dunn & Anders Tøttrup
Monitoring insects across space and time is challenging, due to their vast taxonomic and functional diversity. This study demonstrates how nets mounted on rooftops of cars (car nets) and DNA metabarcoding can be applied to sample flying insect richness and diversity across large spatial scales within a limited time period. During June 2018, 365 car net samples were collected by 151 volunteers during two daily time intervals on 218 routes in Denmark. Insect bulk samples...

Combining epidemiological and ecological methods to quantify social effects on E. coli transmission

Trevor Farthing, Daniel Dawson, Michael Sanderson, Hannah Seger & Cristina Lanzas
Enteric microparasites like Escherichia coli utilize multiple transmission pathways to propagate within and between host populations. Characterizing the relative transmission risk attributable to host social relationships, and direct physical contact between individuals is paramount for understanding how microparasites like E. coli spread within affected communities and estimating colonization rates. To measure these effects, we carried out commensal E. coli transmission experiments in two cattle (Bos taurus) herds, wherein all individuals were equipped with real-time location...

Gestational Cd exposure in the CD-1 mouse induces sex-specific hepatic insulin insensitivity, obesity and metabolic syndrome in adult female offspring

Thomas Jackson, Garret Ryherd, Chris Scheibly, Aubrey Sasser, T. C. Guillette & Scott Belcher
There is compelling evidence that developmental exposure to some toxic metals increases risk for obesity and obesity-related morbidity including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adults. To explore the hypothesis that developmental Cd exposure increased risk of obesity later in life, male and female CD-1 mice were maternally exposed to 500 ppb CdCl2 in drinking water during a human gestational equivalent period (GD0 - PND10). Hallmark indicators of metabolic disruption, hepatic steatosis, and metabolic...

Data from: A resurrection study reveals limited evolution of thermal performance in response to recent climate change across the geographic range of the scarlet monkeyflower

Rachel Wooliver & Seema Sheth
Evolutionary rescue can prevent populations from declining under climate change, and should be more likely at high-latitude, “leading” edges of species’ ranges due to greater temperature anomalies and gene flow from warm-adapted populations. Using a resurrection study with seeds collected before and after a seven-year period of record warming, we tested for thermal adaptation in the scarlet monkeyflower Mimulus cardinalis. We grew ancestors and descendants from northern-edge, central, and southern-edge populations across eight temperatures. Despite...

Data From: Phylogenomics reveals accelerated late Cretaceous diversification of bee flies (Diptera: Bombyliidae)

Xuankun Li, Luisa C. Teasdale, Keith M. Bayless, Allan G. Ellis, Brian M. Wiegmann, Carlos José E. Lamas, Christine L. Lambkin, Neal L. Evenhuis, James A. Nicholls, Diana Hartley, Seunggwan Shin, Michelle Trautwein, Andreas Zwick, Bryan D. Lessard & David K. Yeates
Bombyliidae is a very species-rich and widespread family of parasitoid flies with more than 250 genera classified into 17 extant subfamilies. However, little is known about their evolutionary history or how their present-day diversity was shaped. Transcriptomes of 15 species and anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) sequence captures of 86 species, representing 94 bee fly species and 14 subfamilies, were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of Bombyliidae. We integrated data from transcriptomes across each of the...

A new pipeline for removing paralogs in target enrichment data

Wenbin Zhou, John Soghigian &
Target enrichment (such as Hyb-Seq) is a well-established high throughput sequencing method that has been increasingly used for phylogenomic studies. Unfortunately, current widely used pipelines for analysis of target enrichment data do not have a vigorous procedure to remove paralogs in target enrichment data. In this study, we develop a pipeline we call Putative Paralogs Detection (PPD) to better address putative paralogs from enrichment data. The new pipeline is an add-on to the existing HybPiper...

Data from: AgMate: an optimal mating software versus other mate pair designing methods on long-term breeding of Pinus taeda L

Khushi Goda & Fikret Isik
Breeding objectives aim to optimize two crucial but contrasting goals of maximizing genetic gain while managing genetic diversity. In advanced generations, this becomes a challenge in monoecious conifer tree species breeding programs because they suffer from inbreeding. Developing an algorithm that maximizes genetic gain while maintaining genetic diversity for monoecious species is imperative. While methods and algorithms for animal breeding are well-established, an efficient algorithm suited to monoecious species remains elusive. Towards this goal, we...

Data from: The transcriptional landscape of seasonal coat colour moult in the snowshoe hare

Mafalda S. Ferreira, Paulo C. Alves, Colin M. Callahan, João P. Marques, L. Scott Mills, Jeffrey M. Good & José Melo-Ferreira
Seasonal coat colour change is an important adaptation to seasonally changing environments but the evolution of this and other circannual traits remains poorly understood. In this study we use gene expression to understand seasonal coat colour moulting in wild snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus). We used hair colour to follow the progression of the moult, simultaneously sampling skin from three moulting stages in hares collected during the peak of the spring moult from white winter to...

Data from: Analyzing negative feedback using a synthetic gene network expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo

Ashley Jermusyk, Nicholas P. Murphy & Gregory Reeves
Background: A complex network of gene interactions controls gene regulation throughout development and the life of the organisms. Insights can be made into these processes by studying the functional interactions (or “motifs”) which make up these networks. Results: We sought to understand the functionality of one of these network motifs, negative feedback, in a multi-cellular system. This was accomplished using a synthetic network expressed in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo using the yeast proteins Gal4 (a...

Data from: Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities

Santiago R. Ramírez, Carlos Hernández, Andres Link & Margarita M. López-Uribe
Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of...

Data from: Genetic basis of continuous variation in the levels and modular inheritance of pigmentation in cichlid fishes

R. Craig Albertson, Kara E. Powder, Yinan Hu, Kaitlin P. Coyle, Reade B. Roberts & Kevin J. Parsons
Variation in pigmentation type and levels is a hallmark of myriad evolutionary radiations, and biologists have long been fascinated by the factors that promote and maintain variation in coloration across populations. Here we provide insights into the genetic basis of complex and continuous patterns of color variation in cichlid fishes, which offer a vast diversity of pigmentation patterns that have evolved in response to both natural and sexual selection. Specifically, we crossed two divergent cichlid...

Data from: Defining the role of the MADS-box gene, Zea agamous like1, a target of selection during maize domestication

David M. Wills, Zhou Fang, Alessandra M. York, James B. Holland & John F. Doebley
Genomic scans for genes that show the signature of past selection have been widely applied to a number of species and have identified a large number of selection candidate genes. In cultivated maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) selection scans have identified several hundred candidate domestication genes by comparing nucleotide diversity and differentiation between maize and its progenitor, teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis). One of these is a gene called zea agamous-like1 (zagl1), a MADS-box transcription...

Data from: Beyond thermal limits: comprehensive metrics of performance identify key axes of thermal adaptation in ants

Clint A. Penick, Sarah E. Diamond, Nathan J. Sanders & Robert R. Dunn
How species respond to temperature change depends in large part on their physiology. Physiological traits, such as critical thermal limits (CTmax and CTmin), provide estimates of thermal performance but may not capture the full impacts of temperature on fitness. Rather, thermal performance likely depends on a combination of traits—including thermal limits—that vary among species. Here we examine how thermal limits correlate with the main components that influence fitness in ants. First, we compare how temperature...

Data from: An assessment of tree availability as a possible cause of population declines in scavenging raptors

Corinne J. Kendall, Daniel I. Rubenstein, Pamela L. Slater & Ara Monadjem
Lack of suitable nesting trees is an increasingly common issue for avian conservation given rampant habitat and tree destruction around the world. In the African savannah, habitat loss and particularly tree damage caused by elephants have been suggested as possible factors in the decline of large bird species. Given the recent declines of vultures and other scavenging raptors, it is critical to understand if nest availability is a limiting factor for these threatened populations. Loss...

Data from: Attract or defend? Pollen and vegetative secondary chemistry of three pollen-rewarding lupines

Jacob M. Heiling, Daniel Cook, Stephen T. Lee & Rebecca E. Irwin
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Optimal Defense Theory predicts that selection should drive plants to differentially allocate resources for herbivore defense to tissues with high fitness values. As pollen’s primary role is the transport of gametes, plants may be expected to defend it from herbivory. However, for many animal-pollinated plants, pollen serves a secondary role as a pollinator reward. This may present a conflict between selection to defend pollen from herbivores and selection to reward pollinators....

Data from: Direct and indirect effects of nitrogen enrichment on soil organisms and carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a semi‐arid grassland

Dima Chen, Wen Xing, Zhichun Lan, Muhammad Saleem, Yunqiqige Wu, Shuijin Hu & Yongfei Bai
1. Semi-arid grasslands on the Mongolian Plateau are expected to experience high inputs of anthropogenic reactive nitrogen in this century. It remains unclear, however, how soil organisms and nutrient cycling are directly affected by N enrichment (i.e., without mediation by plant input to soil) vs. indirectly affected via changes in plant-related inputs to soils resulting from N enrichment. 2. To test the direct and indirect effects of N enrichment on soil organisms (bacteria, fungi, and...

Data from: Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free-ranging domestic cats: prey responses to an exotic predator removal program

Michael V. Cove, Beth Gardner, Theodore R. Simons & Allan F. O'Connell
The Lower Keys marsh rabbit is one of many endangered endemic species of the Florida Keys. The main threats are habitat loss and fragmentation from sea level rise, development, and habitat succession. Exotic predators such as free-ranging domestic cats pose an additional threat to these endangered small mammals. Management strategies have focused on habitat restoration and exotic predator control. However, the effectiveness of predator removal and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications and restoration have...

Data from: Re-evaluating neonatal-age models for ungulates: does model choice affect survival estimates?

Troy W. Grovenburg, Kevin L. Monteith, Christopher N. Jacques, Robert W. Klaver, Christopher S. DePerno, Todd J. Brinkman, Kyle B. Monteith, Sophie L. Gilbert, Joshua B. Smith, Vernon C. Bleich, Christopher C. Swanson & Jonathan A. Jenks
New-hoof growth is regarded as the most reliable metric for predicting age of newborn ungulates, but variation in estimated age among hoof-growth equations that have been developed may affect estimates of survival in staggered-entry models. We used known-age newborns to evaluate variation in age estimates among existing hoof-growth equations and to determine the consequences of that variation on survival estimates. During 2001–2009, we captured and radiocollared 174 newborn (≤24-hrs old) ungulates: 76 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus...

Data from: Reconciling multiple impacts of nitrogen enrichment on soil carbon: plant, microbial, and geochemical controls

Chenglong Ye, Dima Chen, Steven J. Hall, Shang Pan, Xuebin Yan, Tongshuo Bai, Hui Guo, Yi Zhang, Yongfei Bai & Shuijin Hu
Impacts of reactive nitrogen (N) inputs on ecosystem carbon (C) dynamics are highly variable, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we proposed a new conceptual framework that integrates plant, microbial, and geochemical mechanisms to reconcile diverse and contrasting impacts of N on soil C. This framework was tested using long-term N enrichment and acid addition experiments in a Mongolian steppe grassland. Distinct mechanisms could explain effects of N on particulate and mineral-associated soil C...

Data from: Balancing selection for aflatoxin in Aspergillus flavus is maintained through interference competition with, and fungivory by insects

Milton T. Drott, Brian P. Lazzaro, Dan L. Brown, Ignazio Carbone & Michael G. Milgroom
The role of microbial secondary metabolites in the ecology of the organisms that produce them remains poorly understood. Variation in aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus is maintained by balancing selection, but the ecological function and impact on fungal fitness of this compound are unknown. We hypothesize that balancing selection for aflatoxin production in A. flavus is driven by interaction with insects. To test this, we competed naturally occurring aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic fungal isolates against Drosophila...

Data from: Ecosystem function in predator-prey food webs - confronting dynamic models with empirical data

Alva Curtsdotter, H. Thomas Banks, John E Banks, Mattias Jonsson, Tomas Jonsson, Amanda N. Laubmeier, Michael Traugott & Riccardo Bommarco
1. Most ecosystem functions and related services involve species interactions across trophic levels, e.g. pollination and biological pest control. Despite this, our understanding of ecosystem function in multi-trophic communities is poor, and research has been limited to either manipulations in small communities or statistical descriptions in larger ones. 2. Recent advances in food web ecology may allow us to overcome the trade-off between mechanistic insight and ecological realism. Molecular tools now simplify the detection of...

Data from: Snap-jaw morphology is specialized for high-speed power amplification in the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae

Fredrick J. Larabee, Adrian A. Smith & Andrew V. Suarez
What is the limit of animal speed and what mechanisms produce the fastest movements? More than natural history trivia, the answer provides key insight into the form-function relationship of musculoskeletal movement and can determine the outcome of predator-prey interactions. The fastest known animal movements belong to arthropods, including trap-jaw ants, mantis shrimp, and froghoppers, that have incorporated latches and springs into their appendage systems to overcome the limits of muscle power. In contrast to these...

Data from: A hierarchical distance sampling model to estimate abundance and covariate associations of species and communities

Rahel Sollmann, Beth Gardner, Kathryn A. Williams, Andrew T. Gilbert & Richard R. Veit
Distance sampling is a common survey method in wildlife studies, because it allows accounting for imperfect detection. The framework has been extended to hierarchical distance sampling (HDS), which accommodates the modelling of abundance as a function of covariates, but rare and elusive species may not yield enough observations to fit such a model. We integrate HDS into a community modelling framework that accommodates multi-species spatially replicated distance sampling data. The model allows species-specific parameters, but...

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