38 Works

Phylogenetic study of the New Caledonian endemic genus Adenodaphne (Lauraceae) confirms its synonymy with Litsea

Jérôme Munzinger, Gordon McPherson, Stacey Meyer & Chrissen Gemmill
The genus Adenodaphne is currently considered endemic to New Caledonia, but its distinction from Litsea is questionable based on morphological similarity. An earlier phylogenetic analysis (ITS) including one species of Adenodaphne and two Asian species of Litsea did support their close relationship but did not permit resolution of their generic boundary. We sampled the four species of Adenodaphne currently recognized (11 accessions) and 11 of the 13 endemic species of Litsea currently recognized, plus one...

Data from: Recurrent evolution of dioecy in bryophytes

Stuart F. McDaniel, John Atwood & J. Gordon Burleigh
The origin and maintenance of separate sexes (dioecy) is an enduring evolutionary puzzle. Although both hermaphroditism and dioecy occur in many diverse clades, we know little about the long-term evolutionary consequences of changing sexual system. Here we find evidence for at least 133 transitions between sexual systems in mosses, representing an almost unparalleled lability in the evolution of their sexual systems. Furthermore, in contrast to predictions, the transition rate from hermaphroditism to dioecy was approximately...

Data from: The influence of topography and soil phosphorus on the vegetation of Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun

Duncan W. Thomas, David M. Newbery, P. G. Waterman & J. S. Gartlan
All living trees (≥ 30 cm gbh) were enumerated in 135 80×80 m plots, each subdivided into four 40×40 m subplots, and arranged along four 5 km transect lines in the Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun. For each plot altitude, slope and the extent of permanent and seasonal swamps were recorded. Four hundred and eleven taxa were recognized of which 66% were identified to species. Mean tree density was 471 ha−1, basal area 27.6 m2 ha−1...

Accounting for imperfect detection in data from museums and herbaria when modeling species distributions: Combining and contrasting data-level versus model-level bias correction

Kelley D. Erickson & Adam B. Smith
The digitization of museum collections as well as an explosion in citizen science initiatives has resulted in a wealth of data that can be useful for understanding the global distribution of biodiversity, provided that the well-documented biases inherent in unstructured opportunistic data are accounted for. While traditionally used to model imperfect detection using structured data from systematic surveys of wildlife, occupancy models provide a framework for modelling the imperfect collection process that results in digital...

Phylogeny, biogeography, and morphological evolution among and within the Neotropical and Asian clades of Schefflera (Araliaceae)

Gregory Plunkett, Porter Lowry, Pedro Fiaschi, David Frodin & Antoine Nicolas
Schefflera is the largest and most complex genus of Araliaceae, with ~600 described species (and many additional species awaiting formal description), but recent studies indicate that it is polyphyletic, forming five geographically centered clades spread across the major lineages of the family. Significant progress has been made in revising the three smallest clades, but the two largest groups, centered in Asia and the Neotropics, remain poorly understood. To advance our knowledge of these groups, a...

Data from: Issues and perspectives in species delimitation using phenotypic data: Atlantean evolution in Darwin's finches

Carlos Daniel Cadena, Felipe Zapata & Iván Jiménez
Progress in the development and use of methods for species delimitation employing phenotypic data lags behind conceptual and practical advances in molecular genetic approaches. The basic evolutionary model underlying the use of phenotypic data to delimit species assumes random mating and quantitative polygenic traits, so that phenotypic distributions within a species should be approximately normal for individuals of the same sex and age. Accordingly, two or more distinct normal distributions of phenotypic traits suggest the...

Data from: How much of the world is woody?

Richard G. FitzJohn, Matt W. Pennell, Amy E. Zanne, Peter F. Stevens, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell & Matthew W. Pennell
1.The question posed by the title of this paper is a basic one, and it is surprising that the answer is not known. Recently assembled trait datasets provide an opportunity to address this, but scaling these datasets to the global scale is challenging because of sampling bias. Although we currently know the growth form of tens of thousands of species, these data are not a random sample of global diversity; some clades are exhaustively characterised,...

Data from: A reevaluation of the Andean Genus Petroravenia (Brassicaceae: Thelypodieae) based on morphological and molecular data

Diego L. Salariato, Fernando O. Zuloaga & Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz
Abstract Petroravenia was until recently considered as a genus of three species (P. eseptata, P. friesii, and P. werdermannii) distributed along the Central Andes of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. This genus was included in the tribe Thelypodieae and was morphologically characterized by being tiny rhizomatous perennial herbs with rosulate leaves, dendritic trichomes, capsular silicles, and incumbent cotyledons. However, the phylogeny of Petroravenia, and its tribal placement, was never analyzed using molecular data. The lack...

Data from: Climate change is associated with increased allocation to potential outcrossing in a common mixed mating species

Matthew Austin, Piper Cole, Kenneth Olsen & Adam Smith
Premise: The balance between cross- and self-fertilization is driven by the environment. Yet no long-term study has documented whether anthropogenic climate change is affecting reproductive strategy allocation in species with mixed mating systems. Here, we test whether the common blue violet (Viola sororia; Violaceae) has altered relative allocation to the production of potentially outcrossing flowers as the climate has changed across the 20th century. Methods: Using herbarium records spanning 1875 to 2015 from the central...

Aboveground carbon stocks and dynamics in Andean forests

Alvaro Duque, Miguel Peña, Francisco Cuesta, Sebastián González-Caro, Peter Kennedy, Oliver Phillips, Marco Calderón, Cecilia Blundo, Julieta Carilla, Leslie Cayola, William Farfán-Ríos, Alfredo Fuentes, Ricardo Grau, Jürgen Homeier, María I. Loza-Rivera, Jonathan A. Myers, Oriana Osinaga-Acosta, Manuel Peralvo, Esteban Pinto, Sassan Saatchi, Miles Silman, J. Sebastián Tello, Andrea Terán-Valdez & Kenneth J. Feeley
This dataset (Andean_AGB.xlsx) has the data employed in the paper entitled Old-growth Andean forests as globally important carbon sinks and future carbon refuges. The data was compiled as the results of the work of several research teams spread out across the Andean region. The information available here has data about aboveground carbon stocks and dynamics and the main explanatory variables, such as climate and symbiotic root associations.

Data from: Evolution and biogeography of Memecylon

Prabha Amarasinghe, Sneha Joshi, Navendu Page, Lahiru S. Wijedasa, Mary Merello, Hashendra Kathriarachchi, Robert Douglas Stone, Walter Judd, Ullasa Kodandaramaiah & Nico Cellinese
Premise The woody plant group Memecylon (Melastomataceae) is a large clade occupying diverse forest habitats in the Old World tropics and exhibiting high regional endemism. Its phylogenetic relationships have been previously studied using ribosomal DNA with extensive sampling from Africa and Madagascar. However, divergence times, biogeography, and character evolution of Memecylon remain uninvestigated. We present a phylogenomic analysis of Memecylon to provide a broad evolutionary perspective of this clade. Methods One hundred supercontigs of 67...

Data from: Fragmentation of Atlantic Forest has not affected gene flow of a widespread seed-dispersing bat

Eve S. McCulloch, J. Sebastian Tello, Andrew Whitehead, Claudia M. J. Rolón-Mendoza, Mario C. D. Maldonado-Rodríguez & Richard D. Stevens
Habitat loss and resultant fragmentation are major threats to biodiversity, particularly in tropical and subtropical ecosystems. It is increasingly urgent to understand fragmentation effects, which are often complex and vary across taxa, time and space. We determined whether recent fragmentation of Atlantic forest is causing population subdivision in a widespread and important Neotropical seed-disperser: Artibeus lituratus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae). Genetic structure within highly fragmented forest in Paraguay was compared to that in mostly contiguous forest in...

Diversification of the orchid genus Tridactyle: origin of endemism on the oceanic islands of São Tomé & Príncipe in the Gulf of Guinea

Tania D'haijere, Esra Kaymak, Arthur Boom, Olivier Hardy, Tariq Stévart & Patrick Mardulyn
Aim: Oceanic islands have played an important role in our understanding of the diversification of organisms, and phylogenetic estimates have been used in this context to investigate the origin of island diversity and its relationship to the continent. Using a typical orchid genus rich in island endemics and with widespread continental relatives, we aim to compare alternative hypotheses of diversification with a focus on island endemism. Location: Tropical Africa and the Gulf of Guinea Islands...

Extinct plants of North America north of Mexico

Wesley Knapp, Anne Frances, Reed Noss, Robert Naczi, Alan Weakley, George Gann, Bruce Baldwin, James Miller, Patrick McIntyre, Brent Mishler, Gerry Moore, Richard Olmstead, Anna Strong, Daniel Gluesenkamp & Kathryn Kennedy
The recent study by Humphreys et al., reporting extinction of almost 600 plant species globally, represents a groundbreaking effort at compiling direct data on seed plants. We applaud Humphreys et al. for quantifying plant extinctions because they formulate an important and testable hypothesis. However, their study missed many extinctions and rediscoveries of seed plants in the United States and Canada. Our team of experts has been compiling a list of extinct plants of North America...

Data from: Brassicales phylogeny inferred from 72 plastid genes: a reanalysis of the phylogenetic localization of two paleopolyploid events and origin of novel chemical defenses

Patrick P. Edger, Jocelyn C. Hall, Alex Harkess, Michelle Tang, Jill Coombs, Setareh Mohammadin, M. Eric Schranz, Zhiyong Xiong, James Leebens-Mack, Blake C. Meyers, Kenneth J. Systma, Marcus A. Koch, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, J. Chris Pires & Kenneth J. Sytsma
PREMISE OF THE STUDY - Previous phylogenetic studies employing molecular markers have yielded various insights into the evolutionary history across Brassicales, but many relationships between families remain poorly supported or unresolved. A recent phylotranscriptomic approach utilizing 1155 nuclear markers obtained robust estimates for relationships among 14 of 17 families. Here we report a complete family‐level phylogeny estimated using the plastid genome. METHODS - We conducted phylogenetic analyses on a concatenated data set comprising 44,926 bp...

Data from: Ecosystem response to interventions: lessons from restored and created wetland ecosystems

David Moreno-Mateos, Paula Meli, María Isabel Vara-Rodriguez & James Aronson
1. Current efforts to restore and create ecosystems require greater understanding of ecosystems’ responses to commonly used physical and biological intervention approaches to overcome ecological and technological limitations. 2. We estimated effect sizes from measurements of biotic assemblage structure and biogeochemical functions at 628 restored and created wetlands globally, in comparison with 499 reference wetlands. We studied the recovery trajectories of wetlands where different restoration or creation approaches were used under different environmental settings. 3....

Data from: Congruent phylogeographic patterns of eight tree species in Atlantic Central Africa provide insights on the past dynamics of forest cover

Gilles Dauby, Jérôme Duminil, Myriam Heuertz, K. Guillaume Koffi, Tariq Stévart & Olivier J. Hardy
Cycles of Quaternary climate change are assumed to be major drivers of African rainforest dynamics and evolution. However, most hypotheses on past vegetation dynamics relied on palaeobotanical records, an approach lacking spatial resolution, and on current patterns of species diversity and endemism, an approach confounding history and environmental determinism. In this context, a comparative phylogeographic study of rainforest species represents a complementary approach because Pleistocene climate fluctuations may have left interpretable signatures in the patterns...

Environmental correlates of Leguminosae species richness in Mexico: quantifying the contributions of energy and environmental seasonality

Maribel Arenas-Navarro, Oswaldo Téllez-Valdés, Gabriel López-Segoviano, Miguel Murguía-Romero & Sebastián Tello
Explaining species richness patterns is a central issue in ecology, but a general explanation remain elusive. Environmental conditions have been proposed to be important drivers of these patterns, but we still need to better understand the relative contribution of environmental factors. Here we aim at testing two environmental hypotheses for richness gradients: energy availability and environmental seasonality using diversity patterns of the family Leguminosae across Mexico. We compiled a database of 502 species and 32,962...

Biogeographic diversification of Eranthis (Ranunculaceae) reflects the geological history of the three great Asian plateaus

Kun-Li Xiang, Andrey S. Erst, Jian Yang, Huan-Wen Peng, Rosa Del C. Ortiz, Florian Jabbour, Tatyana V. Erst & Wei Wang
The evolutionary history of organisms with poor dispersal abilities usually parallels geological events. Collisions of the Indian and Arabian plates with Eurasia greatly changed Asian topography and affected regional and global climate as well as biotic evolution. However, the geological evolution of Asia related to these two collisions remains debated. Here, we used Eranthis, an angiosperm genus with poor seed dispersal ability and a discontinuous distribution across Eurasia , to shed light on the orogenesis...

Data from: Local tropical forest restoration strategies affect tree recruitment more strongly than does landscape forest cover

Karen D. Holl, John Leighton Reid, José Miguel Chaves-Fallas, Federico Oviedo-Brenes & Rakan A. Zahawi
Developing restoration strategies that accelerate natural successional processes and are resource‐efficient is critical to facilitating tropical forest recovery across millions of hectares of deforested lands in the tropics. We compared tree recruitment after a decade in three restoration treatments (natural regeneration, applied nucleation/island tree planting and plantation) and nearby reference forest in the premontane rain forest zone in southern Costa Rica. The study was replicated at 13 sites with a range of surrounding forest cover,...

Taxonomic studies on Malagasy Dalbergia (Fabaceae). III. Two new species from Southeastern Madagascar and an emended description of the rosewood species D. maritima

Simon Crameri, Peter B. Phillipson, Nivohenintsoa Rakotonirina, Nicholas Wilding, Roger Lala Andriamiarisoa, & Alex Widmer
The Malagasy rosewood species Dalbergia maritima has a long history of unsustainable exploitation for its beautiful, burgundy-colored heartwood. As currently circumscribed, D. maritima has a wide geographic distribution in eastern Madagascar and exhibits significant morphological, ecological, and genetic variation, suggesting it may comprise more than a single entity. Multivariate analyses of leaf, flower, and inflorescence characters as well as eco-geographic features reveal several morphologically well delimited entities with distinct habitat preferences and/or geographic ranges, which...

Immigration dynamics of tropical and subtropical Southeast Asian limestone karst floras

Xiao-Qian Li, Xiao-Guo Xiang, Qiang Zhang, Florian Jabbour, Rosa Del C. Ortiz, Andrey S. Erst, Zhen-Yu Li & Wei Wang
Ex situ origins and dispersal of taxa have played important roles in the assembly of island-like biodiversity hotspots. Insular limestone karsts in Southeast Asia are hotspots of biodiversity and endemism, but the immigration processes of their unique floras are still poorly known. Here, we used Gesneriaceae as a proxy to investigate immigration dynamics of tropical and subtropical Southeast Asian karst floras. We show that immigration into subtropical Southeast Asian karst floras first occurred in the...

Data from: Phylogeny and photosynthesis of the grass tribe Paniceae

Jacob D. Washburn, James C. Schnable, Gerrit Davidse & J. Chris Pires
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The grass tribe Paniceae includes important food, forage, and bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napiergrass, various millet species, and economically important weeds. Paniceae are also valuable for answering scientific and evolutionary questions about C4 photosynthetic evolution, drought tolerance, and spikelet variation. However, the phylogeny of the tribe remains incompletely resolved. METHODS: Forty-five taxa were selected from across the tribe Paniceae and outgroups for genome survey sequencing (GSS). These data were used...

Data from: Does hybridization drive the transition to asexuality in diploid Boechera?

James Benjamin Beck, Patrick J. Alexander, Loreen Allphin, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, Catherine Rushworth, C. Donovan Bailey & Michael D. Windham
Gametophytic apomixis is a common form of asexual reproduction in plants. Virtually all gametophytic apomicts are polyploids, and some view polyploidy as a prerequisite for the transition to apomixis. However, any causal link between apomixis and polyploidy is complicated by the fact that most apomictic polyploids are allopolyploids, leading some to speculate that hybridization, rather than polyploidy, enables apomixis. Diploid apomixis presents a rare opportunity to isolate the role of hybridization, and a number of...

Data from: Bioclimatic envelope models predict a decrease in tropical forest carbon stocks with climate change in Madagascar

Ghislain Vieilledent, Oliver Gardi, Clovis Grinand, Christian Burren, Mamitiana Andriamanjato, Christian Camara, Charlie J. Gardner, Leah Glass, Andriambolantsoa Rasolohery, Harifidy Ratsimba, Valéry Gond & Jean-Roger Rakotoarijaona
1. Recent studies have underlined the importance of climatic variables in determining tree height and biomass in tropical forests. Nonetheless, the effects of climate on tropical forest carbon stocks remain uncertain. In particular, the application of process-based dynamic global vegetation models have led to contrasting conclusions regarding the potential impact of climate change on tropical forest carbon storage. 2. Using a correlative approach based on a bioclimatic envelope model and data from 1771 forest plots...

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