51 Works

Data from: Trophic plasticity in a common reef-building coral: Insights from δ13C analysis of essential amino acids

Michael Fox, Emma Elliott Smith, Jennifer Smith & Seth Newsome
1. Reef-building corals are mixotrophic organisms that can obtain nutrition from endosymbiotic microalgae (autotrophy) and particle capture (heterotrophy). Heterotrophic nutrition is highly beneficial to many corals, particularly in times of stress. Yet the extent to which different coral species rely on heterotrophic nutrition remains largely unknown because it is challenging to quantify. 2. We developed a quantitative approach to investigate coral nutrition using carbon isotope (δ13C) analysis of six essential amino acids (AAESS) in a...

Data from: Strong selective effects of mitochondrial DNA on the nuclear genome

Timothy Healy & Ronald Burton
Oxidative phosphorylation, the primary source of cellular energy in eukaryotes, requires gene products encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. As a result, functional integration between the genomes is essential for efficient adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation. Although within populations this integration is presumably maintained by coevolution, the importance of mitonuclear coevolution in key biological processes such as speciation and mitochondrial disease has been questioned. In this study, we crossed populations of the intertidal copepod...

Changes in sea ice and range expansion of sperm whales in the eclipse sound region of Baffin Bay, Canada

Natalie Posdaljian
Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are a cosmopolitan species but are only found in ice-free regions of the ocean. It is unknown how their distribution might change in regions undergoing rapid loss of sea ice and ocean warming like Baffin Bay in the eastern Canadian Arctic. In 2014 and 2018, sperm whales were sighted near Eclipse Sound, Baffin Bay: the first recorded uses of this region by sperm whales. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal...

Data set for behavioural OA experiments with Caribbean Damselfish (Stegastes partitus)

Trevor Hamilton, Martin Tresguerres, Joshua Szaszkiewicz, Brian Franczak, Tyler Cyrokak, Andreas Andersson, Garfield Kwan & David Kline
The neurobehavioural responses of fish exposed to ocean acidification (OA) are variable, possibly due to species-specific differences or involvement of multiple neuronal receptors. Here, we investigated behavioural responses of bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus) to OA and the involvement of dopamine receptors. Damselfish were exposed to control (pH 8.06; CO2 ~400 μatm) or OA (pH 7.73; CO2 ~1,000 μatm) seawater for five days, subjected to the open field, novel object approach, light/dark, and mirror-aggression tests, and...

Niche conservation in copepods between ocean basins

Niall McGinty, Andrew Barton, David Johns, Zoe Finkel & Andrew Irwin
This dataset provides the necessary data to test for niche conservatism as demonstrated in the article "Niche conservatism in copepods between ocean basins; 10.1111/ecog.05690". Our study examined niche conservatism (i.e. a species' niche remains stable in space and time) between populations of the same species of marine copepod in different ocean basins. We used two approaches to test for niche conservatism which can be defined as a Princpial Component Analysis (PCA) and Environmental Niche Model...

Proteomic traits vary across taxa in a coastal Antarctic phytoplankton bloom

J. Scott P. McCain, Andrew E. Allen & Erin M. Bertrand
Production and use of proteins is under strong selection in microbes, but it is unclear how proteome-level traits relate to ecological strategies. We identified and quantified proteomic traits of eukaryotic microbes and bacteria through an Antarctic phytoplankton bloom using in situ metaproteomics. Different taxa, rather than different environmental conditions, formed distinct clusters based on their ribosomal and photosynthetic proteomic proportions, and we propose that these characteristics relate to ecological differences. We defined and used a...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Data from: Impacts and recovery from Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi on the Great Barrier Reef

Roger J. Beeden, Jeffrey Maynard, Marjetta Puotinen, Paul Marshall, Jen Dryden, Jeremy Goldberg, Gareth Williams & Roger Beeden
Full recovery of coral reefs from tropical cyclone (TC) damage can take decades, making cyclones a major driver of habitat condition where they occur regularly. Since 1985, 44 TCs generated gale force winds (≥17 metres/second) within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP). Of the hurricane strength TCs (≥H1—Saffir Simpson scale; ≥ category 3 Australian scale), TC Yasi (February, 2011) was the largest. In the weeks after TC Yasi crossed the GBRMP, participating researchers, managers...

Data from: Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific

Eva Maire, Sébastien Villéger, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Andrew S. Hoey, Joshua Cinner, Sebastian C.A. Ferse, Catherine Aliaume, David J. Booth, David A. Feary, Michel Kulbicki, Stuart A. Sandin, Laurent Vigliola, David Mouillot & Sebastian C. A. Ferse
Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan (CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute,...

Data from: A metadata approach to evaluate the state of ocean knowledge: strengths, limitations, and application to Mexico

Juliano Palacios-Abrantes, Andrés M. Cisneros-Montemayor, Miguel A. Cisneros-Mata, Laura Rodríguez, Francisco Arreguín-Sánchez, Veronica Aguilar, Santiago Domínguez-Sánchez, Stuart Fulton, Raquel López-Sagástegui, Hector Reyes-Bonilla, Rocio Rivera-Campos, Silvia Salas, Nuno Simoes & William W. L. Cheung
Climate change, mismanaged resource extraction, and pollution are reshaping global marine ecosystems with direct consequences on human societies. Sustainable ocean development requires knowledge and data across disciplines, scales and knowledge types. Although several disciplines are generating large amounts of data on marine socio-ecological systems, such information is often underutilized due to fragmentation across institutions or stakeholders, limited standardization across scale, time or disciplines, and the fact that information is often not searchable within existing databases....

Data from: Coastal landforms and accumulation of mangrove peat increase carbon sequestration and storage

Paula Ezcurra, Exequiel Ezcurra, Pedro P. Garcillán, Matthew T. Costa & Octavio Aburto-Oropeza
Given their relatively small area, mangroves and their organic sediments are of disproportionate importance to global carbon sequestration and carbon storage. Peat deposition and preservation allows some mangroves to accrete vertically and keep pace with sea-level rise by growing on their own root remains. In this study we show that mangroves in desert inlets in the coasts of the Baja California have been accumulating root peat for nearly 2,000 y and harbor a belowground carbon...

Data from: New deep-sea species of Xenoturbella and the position of Xenacoelomorpha

Greg W. Rouse, Nerida G. Wilson, Jose I. Carvajal & Robert C. Vrijenhoek
The discovery of four new Xenoturbella species from deep waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean is reported here. The genus and two nominal species were described from the west coast of Sweden1, 2, but their taxonomic placement remains unstable3, 4. Limited evidence placed Xenoturbella with molluscs5, 6, but the tissues can be contaminated with prey7, 8. They were then considered deuterostomes9, 10, 11, 12, 13. Further taxon sampling and analysis have grouped Xenoturbella with acoelomorphs...

Data from: Pollution-tolerant invertebrates enhance greenhouse gas flux in urban wetlands

Andrew S. Mehring, Perran L.M. Cook, Victor Evrard, Stanley B. Grant, Lisa A. Levin & Perran L. M. Cook
One of the goals of urban ecology is to link community structure to ecosystem function in urban habitats. Pollution-tolerant wetland invertebrates have been shown to enhance greenhouse gas (GHG) flux in controlled laboratory experiments, suggesting that they may influence urban wetland roles as sources or sinks of GHG. However, it is unclear if their effects can be detected in highly variable conditions in a field setting. Here we use an extensive dataset on carbon dioxide...

Data from: Eighty-five million years of Pacific Ocean gyre ecosystem structure: long-term stability marked by punctuated change

Elizabeth Sibert, Richard Norris, Jose M. Cuevas, Lana G. Graves & Jose Cuevas
While the history of taxonomic diversification in open ocean lineages of ray-finned fish and elasmobranchs is increasingly known, the evolution of their roles within the open ocean ecosystem remains poorly understood. To assess the relative importance of these groups through time, we measured the accumulation rate of microfossil fish teeth and elasmobranch dermal denticles (ichthyoliths) in deep-sea sediment cores from the North and South Pacific gyres over the past 85 million years (Myr). We find...

Data from: Food web heterogeneity and succession in created saltmarshes

Marie C. Nordström, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, Christine R. Whitcraft, Andrea Rismondo, Patricia McMillan, Jennifer P. Gonzalez & Lisa A. Levin
Ecological restoration must achieve functional as well as structural recovery. Functional metrics for re-establishment of trophic interactions can be used to complement traditional monitoring of structural attributes. In addition, topographic effects on food web structure provide added information within a restoration context; often, created sites may require spatial heterogeneity to effectively match structure and function of natural habitats. We addressed both of these issues in our study of successional development of benthic food web structure,...

The effects of light intensity and flow speed on biogeochemical variability within a fringing coral reef in Onna-son, Okinawa, Japan

Max Rintoul, Travis Courtney, Julia Dohner, Sarah Giddings, Samuel Kekuewa, Stephen Monismith, Ariel Pezner, Andreas Andersson & Satoshi Mitarai
Global warming and ocean acidification are driving gradual declines in seawater dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH. Predicting how these changes will affect shallow, near-shore environments including coral reefs is challenging due to high natural variability on both spatial (10 m to km) and temporal (diel to seasonal) scales. To make predictions, it is first necessary to identify and quantify the drivers of this natural variability. While significant efforts have been devoted to characterising the influence...

New Age of Fishes initiated by the Cretaceous−Paleogene mass extinction

Elizabeth C. Sibert & Richard D. Norris
Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) comprise nearly half of all modern vertebrate diversity, and are an ecologically and numerically dominant megafauna in most aquatic environments. Crown teleost fishes diversified relatively recently, during the Late Cretaceous and early Paleogene, although the exact timing and cause of their radiation and rise to ecological dominance is poorly constrained. Here we use microfossil teeth and shark dermal scales (ichthyoliths) preserved in deep-sea sediments to study the changes in the pelagic fish...

HARP Echolocation click and broadband anthropogenic event detections Southern California Bight: 2017-2019 sites E and H

Kaitlin Frasier
This dataset consists of approximatly 80 thousand impulsive detections identified within underwater acoustic recordings collected in the Southern California Bight. These events consist primarily of toothed whale echolocation clicks. Manual labels are provided.

Oceanic particle size distributions for the PacAtl and Arctic datasets

Rick Reynolds & Dariusz Stramski
A dataset of nearly 400 measurements of the particle size distribution (PSD) compiled from the Pacific, Atlantic, and Arctic Oceans is used to examine variability in the magnitude and shape of the PSD, and to characterize the partitioning of particle number, cross-sectional area, and volume concentration among defined size intervals. The results indicate that the relative contributions of three size classes based upon the pico-, nano-, and microplankton size range exhibit substantial changes among measures...

Analyzing coastal fog effects on carbon and water fluxes in a California agricultural system using approaches in biometeorology, remote sensing, and plant physiology

Sara Baguskas, Andrew Oliphant, Rachel Clemesha & Michael Loik
In coastal California, the peak growing season of economically important crops is concurrent with fog events, which buffer drought stress during the dry season. Coastal fog patterns are changing, so we quantified its effects on the energy, water, and carbon fluxes of an economically important cropland at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Our study site was a strawberry farm located in the fog-belt of the Salinas Valley, California. We used GOES-satellite total albedo to detect...

Echolocation clicks and anthropogenic detections with neural network labels in Hawaiian Island HARP data from Kona, Kaua`i, and Pearl and Hermes Reef

Morgan Ziegenhorn
This dataset consists of echolocation clicks and detections of anthropogenic signals at three sites in the Hawaiian Islands Archipelago. These sites are Hawaii/Hawaii_K, Kauai/KA, and Pearl and Hermes Reef/PHR. Echolocation clicks were grouped into 5 minute bins, for which summary data is provided. Files are in .mat format that can be read using any desired coding language using a netcdf reading script. Files are separated by site, deployment, and neural network class (i.e. sitedeployment_cbins_class or...

Data from: Dermal denticle assemblages in coral reef sediments correlate with conventional shark surveys

Erin Dillon, Kevin Lafferty, Douglas McCauley, Darcy Bradley, Richard Norris, Jennifer Caselle, Graziella DiRenzo, Jonathan Gardner & Aaron O'Dea
It is challenging to assess long-term trends in mobile, long-lived, and relatively rare species such as sharks. Despite ongoing declines in many coastal shark populations, conventional surveys might be too fleeting and too recent to describe population trends over decades to millennia. Placing recent shark declines into historical context should improve management efforts as well as our understanding of past ecosystem dynamics. A new paleoecological approach for surveying shark abundance on coral reefs is to...

Data from: Nutrient pollution disrupts key ecosystem functions on coral reefs

Nyssa J. Silbiger, Craig E. Nelson, Kristina Remple, Jessica K. Sevilla, Zachary A. Quinlan, Hollie M. Putnam, Michael D. Fox & Megan J. Donahue
There is a long history of examining the impacts of nutrient pollution and pH on coral reefs. However, little is known about how these two stressors interact and influence coral reef ecosystem functioning. Using a six-week nutrient addition experiment, we measured the impact of elevated nitrate (NO3) and phosphate (PO43) on net community calcification (NCC) and net community production (NCP) rates of individual taxa and combined reef communities. Our study had four major outcomes: 1)...

Data from: Bone-eating Osedax females and their 'harems' of dwarf males are recruited from a common larval pool

Robert C Vrijenhoek, Shannon B Johnson & Greg W Rouse
Extreme male dwarfism occurs in Osedax (Annelida: Siboglinidae), marine worms with sessile females that bore into submerged bones. Osedax are hypothesized to use environmental sex-determination (ESD), in which undifferentiated larvae that settle on bones develop as females, and subsequent larvae that settle on females transform into dwarf males. This study addresses several hypotheses regarding possible recruitment sources for the males: (1) common larval pool — males and females are sampled from a common pool of...

Data from: Resolving the evolutionary relationships of molluscs with phylogenomic tools

Stephen A. Smith, Casey W. Dunn, Nerida G. Wilson, Freya E. Goetz, Caitlin Feehery, Sónia C. S. Andrade, Greg W. Rouse & Gonzalo Giribet
Molluscs (snails, octopuses, clams, and relatives) have great body plan disparity, and among animals only arthropods surpass them in species number. This diversity has made Mollusca one of the best-studied groups of animals, yet their evolutionary relationships remain poorly resolved. Open questions have important implications for the origin of Mollusca and morphological evolution within the group. These include whether the shell-less vermiform aplacophoran molluscs diverged prior to the origin of the shelled molluscs (Conchifera), or...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    7
  • 2021
    10
  • 2020
    9
  • 2019
    5
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    5
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    3
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    4
  • 2015
    2
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    1
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    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    50
  • University of California, San Diego
    7
  • Stanford University
    3
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    3
  • Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
    3
  • Harvard University
    3
  • Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology
    2
  • Dalhousie University
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • San Diego State University
    2