18 Works

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: Characterization of C-ring component assembly in flagellar motors from amino acid coevolution

Ricardo Nascimento Dos Santos, Shahid Khan & Faruck Morcos
Bacterial flagellar motility, an important virulence factor, is energized by a rotary motor localized within the flagellar basal body. The rotor module consists of a large framework (C-ring), composed of the FliG, FliM and FliN proteins. FliN and FliM contacts the FliG torque ring to control the direction of flagellar rotation. We report that structure-based models constrained only by residue coevolution can recover the binding interface of atomic X-ray dimer complexes with remarkable accuracy (ca....

Data from: Age‐dependent leaf physiology and consequences for crown‐scale carbon uptake during the dry season in an Amazon evergreen forest

Loren P. Albert, Jin Wu, Neill Prohaska, Plinio Barbosa De Camargo, Travis E. Huxman, Edgard S. Tribuzy, Valeriy Y. Ivanov, Rafael S. Oliveira, Sabrina Garcia, Marielle N. Smith, Raimundo Cosme Oliveira Junior, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Rodrigo Da Silva, Scott C. Stark, Giordane A. Martins, Deliane V. Penha & Scott R. Saleska
* Satellite and tower-based metrics of forest-scale photosynthesis generally increase with dry season progression across central Amazônia, but the underlying mechanisms lack consensus. * We conducted demographic surveys of leaf age composition, and measured age-dependence of leaf physiology in broadleaf canopy trees of abundant species at a central eastern Amazon site. Using a novel leaf-to-branch scaling approach, we used this data to independently test the much-debated hypothesis—arising from satellite and tower-based observations—that leaf phenology could...

Data from: Temporal variation in plant-pollinator networks from seasonal tropical environments: higher specialization when resources are scarce

Camila S. Souza, Pietro K. Maruyama, Camila Aoki, Maria Rosangela Sigrist, Josué Raizer, Caroline L. Gross & Andréa C. De Araujo
The temporal dynamics of plant phenology and pollinator abundance across seasons should influence the structure of plant-pollinator interaction networks. Nevertheless, such dynamics are seldom considered, especially for diverse tropical networks. Here, we evaluated the temporal variation of four plant-pollinator networks in two seasonal ecosystems in Central Brazil (Cerrado and Pantanal). Data were gathered on a monthly basis over one year for each network. We characterized seasonal and temporal shifts in plant-pollinator interactions, using temporally discrete...

Data from: Hydrological niche segregation defines forest structure and drought tolerance strategies in a seasonal Amazon forest

Mauro Brum, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Valeriy Ivanov, Heidi Asbjornsen, Scott Saleska, Luciana F. Alves, Deliane Penha, Jadson D. Dias, Luiz E.O.C. Aragão, Fernanda Barros, Paulo Bittencourt, Luciano Pereira & Rafael S. Oliveira
1) Understanding if and how trees coordinate rooting depth and aboveground hydraulic traits to define drought-resistance strategies in seasonal Amazon forests is a major gap to model parametrization aimed at predicting the effects of climate change in these ecosystems. 2) We assessed the rooting depth of 12 dominant tree species (representing ~ 42% of the forest basal area) in a seasonal Amazon forest, using the stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ²H) of water collected from...

Data from: Ecological mechanisms and phylogeny shape invertebrate stoichiometry: a test using detritus-based communities across Central and South America

Angélica L. González, Régis Céréghino, Olivier Dézerald, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Céline Leroy, Barbara A. Richardson, Michael J. Richardson, Gustavo Q. Romero & Diane S. Srivastava
1. Stoichiometric differences among organisms can affect trophic interactions and rates of nutrient cycling within ecosystems. However, we still know little about either the underlying causes of these stoichiometric differences, or the consistency of these differences across large geographic extents. 2. Here we analyze elemental (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus) composition of 872 aquatic macroinvertebrates (71 species) inhabiting tank bromeliads (n = 140) from five distantly located sites across Central and South America to (1) test phylogenetic,...

Data from: Signatures of microevolutionary processes in phylogenetic patterns

Carolina L.N. Costa, Paula Lemos-Costa, Flavia M.D. Marquitti, Lucas D. Fernandes, Marlon F. Ramos, David M. Schneider, Ayana B. Martins, Marcus A.M. De Aguiar, Carolina L N Costa, Flavia M D Marquitti & Marcus A M De Aguiar
Phylogenetic trees are representations of evolutionary relationships among species and contain signatures of the processes responsible for the speciation events they display. Inferring processes from tree properties, however, is challenging. To address this problem we analysed a spatially-explicit model of speciation where genome size and mating range can be controlled. We simulated parapatric and sympatric (narrow and wide mating range, respectively) radiations and constructed their phylogenetic trees, computing structural properties such as tree balance and...

Data from: Trait patterns across space and time suggest an interplay of facilitation and competition acting on Neotropical hummingbird-pollinated plant communities

Pedro Joaquim Bergamo, Marina Wolowski, Pietro Kiyoshi Maruyama, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni & Marlies Sazima
Pollinators may influence plant community assembly through biotic filtering and/or plant-plant competition and facilitation. The relative importance of each process, however, vary according to the scale and how strongly plants share their pollinators, and possibly in relation to the pollinator groups considered. We here investigated the assembly of three Atlantic forest hummingbird-pollinated plant communities across space (among all species in the communities) and time, i.e. yearly flowering phenology (between pairs of co-flowering species), based on...

Data from: Trait evolution, resource specialization and vulnerability to plant extinctions among Antillean hummingbirds

Bo Dalsgaard, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Benno I. Simmons, Andrea C. Baquero, Ana M. Martín González, Allan Timmermann, Pietro K. Maruyama, Jimmy A. McGuire, Jeff Ollerton, William J. Sutherland & Carsten Rahbek
Species traits are thought to predict feeding specialisation and the vulnerability of a species to extinctions of interaction partners, but the context in which a species evolved and currently inhabits may also matter. Notably, the predictive power of traits may require that traits evolved to fit interaction partners. Furthermore, local abiotic and biotic conditions may be important. On islands, for instance, specialised and vulnerable species are predicted to be found mainly in mountains, whereas species...

Data from: Functional traits and environmental conditions predict community isotopic niches and energy pathways across spatial scales

Olivier Dézerald, Diane S. Srivastava, Régis Céréghino, Jean-François Carrias, Bruno Corbara, Vinicius F. Farjalla, Céline Leroy, Nicholas A. C. Marino, Gustavo C. O. Piccoli, Barbara A. Richardson, Michael J. Richardson, Gustavo Q. Romero & Angélica L. González
1. Despite ongoing research in food web ecology and functional biogeography, the links between food-web structure, functional traits and environmental conditions across spatial scales remain poorly understood. Trophic niches, defined as the amount of energy and elemental space occupied by species and food webs, may help bridge this divide. 2. Here, we ask how the functional traits of species, the environmental conditions of habitats and the spatial scale of analysis jointly determine the characteristics of...

Data from: Comparative analysis of adaptive and neutral markers of Drosophila mediopunctata populations dispersed among forest fragments

Marcos R. D. Batista, Rafael E. S. Penha, Silvia H. Sofia & Louis B. Klaczko
Comparison of adaptive and neutral genetic markers is a valuable approach to characterize the evolutionary consequences of populations living in environments threatened by anthropogenic disturbances, such as forest fragmentation. Shifts in allele frequencies, low genetic variability, and a small effective population size can be considered clear signs of forest fragmentation effects (due to genetic drift) over natural populations, while adaptive responses correlate with environmental variables. Brazilian Atlantic Forest had its landscape drastically reduced and fragmented....

Data from: Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Brazilian version of the Oral Health Literacy Assessment in Spanish and development of a shortened form of the instrument

Fernanda Maria Rovai Bado, Flávio Rebustini, Lisa Jamieson, Karine Laura Cortellazzi & Fábio Luiz Mialhe
Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Oral Health Literacy Assessment in Spanish (OHLA-S) for the Brazilian-Portuguese language using robust analysis and with the results disclose possibilities to develop a shorter and more valid instrument. Methods: OHLA-S is an oral health literacy instrument comprising a word recognition section and a comprehension section. It consists of 24 dental words. It was translated into the Brazilian-Portuguese language (OHLA-B) and its...

Data from: High specialization and limited structural change in plant‐herbivore networks along a successional chronosequence in tropical montane forest

Conor M. Redmond, John Auga, Bradley Gewa, Simon T. Segar, Scott E. Miller, Kenneth Molem, George D. Weiblen, Phillip T. Butterill, Gibson Maiyah, Amelia S.C. Hood, Martin Volf, Leonardo R. Jorge, Yves Basset, Vojtech Novotny, Philip T. Butterill & Amelia S. C. Hood
Secondary succession is well‐understood, to the point of being predictable for plant communities, but the successional changes in plant‐herbivore interactions remains poorly explored. This is particularly true for tropical forests, despite the increasing importance of early successional stages in tropical landscapes. Deriving expectations from successional theory, we examine properties of plant‐herbivore interaction networks while accounting for host phylogenetic structure along a succession chronosequence in montane rainforest in Papua New Guinea. We present one of the...

Data from: Soil types select for plants with matching nutrient‐acquisition and ‐use traits in hyperdiverse and severely nutrient‐impoverished campos rupestres and cerrado in Central Brazil

Anna Abrahão, Patrícia Costa, Hans Lambers, Sara Adrián L. De Andrade, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland Sawaya, Megan H. Ryan & Rafael SIlva Oliveira
1. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the generation of beta-diversity remains a challenge in ecology. Underground plant adaptations to environmental gradients have received relatively little attention. 2. We studied plant nutrient-acquisition strategies and nutrient-use efficiency at three stages of pedogenesis in infertile soils from campos rupestres and on less infertile soil from cerrado sensu stricto in Brazil. All soils support very high plant diversity with high species turnover between soil types at small spatial scales...

Data from: Globally invasive genotypes of the amphibian chytrid outcompete an enzootic lineage in coinfections

Thomas S. Jenkinson, David Rodriguez, Rebecca A. Clemons, Lucas A. Michelotti, Kelly R. Zamudio, Luís Felipe Toledo, Joyce E. Longcore & Timothy Y. James
Competition between genotypes is likely to be a key driver of pathogen evolution, particularly following a geographic invasion by distant strains. Theory predicts that competition between disease strains will result in the most virulent strain persisting. Despite its evolutionary implications, the role of strain competition in shaping populations remains untested for most pathogens. We experimentally investigated the in vivo competitive differences between two divergent lineages of the amphibian-killing chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd). These Bd...

Data from: Resource-Area-Dependence Analysis: inferring animal resource needs from home-range and mapping data

Robert E. Kenward, Eduardo M. Arraut, Peter A. Robertson, Sean S Walls, Nicholas M Casey & Nicholas J Aebischer
An animal’s home-range can be expected to encompass the resources it requires for surviving or reproducing. Thus, animals inhabiting a heterogeneous landscape, where resource patches vary in size, shape and distribution, will naturally have home-ranges of varied sizes, so that each home-range encompasses a minimum required amount of a resource. Home-range size can be estimated from telemetry data, and often key resources, or proxies for them such as the areas of important habitat types, can...

Data from: Contrasting plant water-use responses to groundwater depth in coastal dune ecosystems

Cristina Antunes, Mari Cruz Díaz Barradas, María Zunzunegui, Simone Vieira, Ângela Pereira, Andreia Anjos, Otília Correia, Maria João Pereira & Cristina Máguas
1.Groundwater lowering can produce dramatic changes in the physiological performance and survival of plant species. The impact of decreasing water availability due to climate change and anthropogenic groundwater extraction on coastal dune ecosystems has become of increasing concern, with uncertainties about how vegetation will respond in both the short and long terms. 2.We aimed to evaluate the water‐use responses of different plant functional types to increasing groundwater table depth and how this would affect their...

Data from: Rare frost events reinforce tropical savanna-forest boundaries

William A. Hoffmann, Samuel W. Flake, Rodolfo C.R. Abreu, Natashi A.L. Pilon, Davi R. Rossatto, Giselda Durigan & Rodolfo C. R. Abreu
1) The ability of vegetation to ameliorate or exacerbate environmental extremes can generate feedbacks that mediate the distribution of biomes. It has been suggested that feedbacks between vegetation and frost damage may be important for maintaining savanna, particularly at the edge of the tropics. 2) We quantified frost damage and air temperature across a network of 30 permanent plots distributed across tropical savanna-forest boundaries in Brazil during an uncommonly hard frost. 3) Tree cover strongly...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    18

Affiliations

  • State University of Campinas
    18
  • University of Sao Paulo
    5
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • University of Toulouse
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • AgroParisTech
    2
  • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • University of Arizona
    2