18 Works

Surface indicators are correlated with soil multifunctionality in global drylands

David Eldridge, Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, José Luis Quero, Victoria Ochoa, Beatriz Gonzalo, Pablo García-Palacios, Cristina Escolar, Miguel Garcia-Gomez, Laura Beinticinco, Matthew Bowker, Donaldo Bran, Ignacio Castro, Alex Cea, Mchich Derak, Carlos Ivan Espinosa, Adriana Fronertino, Juan Gaitán, Gabriel Gatica, Susana Gómez-González, Wahida Ghiloufi, Julio Gutierrez, Elizabeth Gusmán-M., Rosa Hernandez, Frederic Hughes, Walter Muiño … & Fernando Maestre
1. Multiple ecosystem functions need to be considered simultaneously to manage and protect the many ecosystem services that are essential to people and their environments. Despite this, cost effective, tangible, relatively simple, and globally-relevant methodologies to monitor in situ soil multifunctionality, i.e. the provision of multiple ecosystem functions by soils, have not been tested at the global scale. 2. We combined correlation analysis and structural equation modelling to explore whether we could find easily measured,...

Forest phenoclusters for Argentina based on vegetation phenology and climate

Eduarda Silveira, Volker Radeloff, Guillermo Martínez Pastur, Sebastián Martinuzzi, Natalia Politi, Leonidas Lizarraga, Luis Rivera, Gregorio Gavier-Pizarro, He Yin, Yamina Rosas, Noelia Calamari, María Navarro, Yanina Sica, Ashley Olah, Julieta Bono & Anna Pidgeon
Forest biodiversity conservation and species distribution modeling greatly benefit from broad-scale forest maps depicting tree species or forest types rather than just presence and absence of forest, or coarse classifications. Ideally, such maps would stem from satellite image classification based on abundant field data for both model training and accuracy assessments, but such field-data does not exist in many parts of the globe. However, different forest types and tree species differ in their vegetation phenology,...

Trade-offs between biodiversity and agriculture are moving targets in dynamic landscapes

Leandro Macchi, Julieta Decarre, Andrea Goijman, Matias Mastrangelo, Pedro Blendinger, Gregorio Gavier-Pizarro, Francisco Murray, Maria Piquer-Rodriguez, Asuncion Semper-Pascual & Tobias Kuemmerle
Understanding how biodiversity responds to intensifying agriculture is critical to mitigating the trade-offs between them. These trade-offs are particularly strong in tropical and subtropical deforestation frontiers, yet it remains unclear how changing landscape context in such frontiers alters agriculture-biodiversity trade-offs. We focus on the Argentinean Chaco, a global deforestation hotspot, to explore how landscape context shapes trade-off curves between agricultural intensity and avian biodiversity. We use a space-for-time approach and integrate a large field dataset...

Data from: Plastome mutations and recombination events in barley chloroplast mutator seedlings

Alejandra Landau, Franco Lencina, Maria G. Pacheco & Alberto R. Prina
The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions....

Data from: Widespread and major losses in multiple ecosystem services as a result of agricultural expansion in the Argentine Chaco

María Paula Barral, Sebastián Villarino, Levers Christian, Baumann Matthias, Tobias Kuemmerle & Matias Mastrangelo
Where agriculture expands into tropical and subtropical forests, social-ecological impacts are typically strong. However, where and how frontier development impacts on ecosystem functioning and services is often unclear, including which services trade off against agricultural production. This constitutes a major barrier towards planning for more sustainable outcomes in deforestation frontiers. Here, we assessed spatiotemporal change in multiple ecosystem services in the Argentine Chaco, a global deforestation hotspot. We modelled and mapped five ecosystem functions (i.e.,...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Contribution of predation to the biological control of a key herbivorous pest in citrus agroecosystems

Juan Pedro R. Bouvet, Alberto Urbaneja, Meritxell Perez-Hedo & Cesar Monzo
Biological control has traditionally simplified the view of trophic relationships between herbivorous pests and their natural enemies in agriculture. The success or failure of this pest management strategy is still mainly attributed to the ability of a few key natural enemies to suppress the pest density. For example, successful regulation of the California red scale (Aonidiella aurantii) a key citrus pest, is generally credited to specific parasitoids of the Aphytis genus. Currently, research is revealing...

Data from: Loss of fungal symbionts at the arid limit of the distribution range in a native Patagonian grass – resource ecophysiological relations

Cecilia Casas, Pedro E. Gundel, Eluney Deliens, Leopoldo J. Iannone, Guillermo García Martinez, María V. Vignale & Hans Schnyder
1. Crucial to our understanding of plant ecology is the consideration of the eco-physiological responses and constraints of plant-fungal symbioses throughout the native distribution range of their host. 2. We examined key eco-physiological roles of two co-occurring fungal symbionts [Epichloë endophytes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF)] in the endemic grass Hordeum comosum across a wide bioclimatic gradient and contrasting grazing severity. We sampled H. comosum plants along four humid-to-arid transects in Patagonia, Argentina, covering its...

Data from: Plant species richness and shrub cover attenuate drought effects on ecosystem functioning across Patagonian rangelands

Juan J. Gaitán, Donaldo Bran, Gabriel Oliva, Fernando T. Maestre, Martín R. Aguiar, Esteban Jobbágy, Gustavo Buono, Daniela Ferrante, Viviana Nakamatsu, Georgina Ciari, Jorge Salomone, Virginia Massara & E. Jobbagy
Drought is an increasingly common phenomenon in drylands as a consequence of climate change. We used 311 sites across a broad range of environmental conditions in Patagonian rangelands to evaluate how drought severity and temperature (abiotic factors) and vegetation structure (biotic factors) modulate the impact of a drought event on the annual integral of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI-I), our surrogate of ecosystem functioning. We found that NDVI-I decreases were larger with both increasing drought...

Data from: Early genetic consequences of defaunation in a large-seeded vertebrate-dispersed palm (Syagrus romanzoffiana)

Mariano I. Giombini, Susana P. Bravo, Yanina V. Sica & Daniela S. Tosto
Plant populations are seriously threatened by anthropogenic habitat disturbance. In particular, defaunation may disrupt plant-disperser mutualisms, thus reducing levels of seed-mediated gene flow and genetic variation in animal-dispersed plants. This may ultimately limit their adaptive potential and ability to cope with environmental change. Tropical forest remnants are typically deprived of medium to large vertebrates upon which many large-seeded plants rely for accomplishing effective seed dispersal. Our main goal was to examine the potential early genetic...

Data from: Remotely-sensed primary productivity shows that domestic and native herbivores combined are overgrazing Patagonia

Gabriel Oliva, Paula Paredes, Daniela Ferrante, Carla Cepeda & Jorge Rabinovich
1. Carrying capacity is the maximum density of animals an area can sustain without a deterioration of its resources. Overgrazing degraded Patagonia grasslands in the past, but sheep stocks decreased in the last three decades and gave way to a mixed system with cattle, goats and guanacos (native wild camelids). 2. The objective of this paper was to develop a method to estimate carrying capacity based on remotely sensed data, and to assess wild and...

Data from: Nutrient availability controls the impact of mammalian herbivores on soil carbon and nitrogen pools in grasslands

Judith Sitters, E.R. Jasper Wubs, Elisabeth S. Bakker, Thomas W. Crowther, Peter B. Adler, Sumanta Bagchi, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Elizabeth T. Borer, Elsa E. Cleland, Nico Eisenhauer, Jennifer Firn, Laureano Gherardi, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Sarah E. Hobbie, Johannes M.H. Knops, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Joslin L. Moore, Brent Mortensen, Pablo L. Peri, Suzanne M. Prober, Charlotte Riggs, Anita C. Risch … &
Grasslands have been subject to considerable alteration due to human activities globally, including widespread changes in populations and composition of large mammalian herbivores and elevated supply of nutrients. Grassland soils remain important reservoirs of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). Herbivores may affect both C and N pools and these changes likely interact with increases in soil nutrient availability. Given the scale of grassland soil fluxes, such changes can have striking consequences for atmospheric C concentrations...

Domestic and wild native herbivores combined are still overgrazing Patagonia rangelands: A response to Marino et al. (2019)

Gabriel Esteban Oliva, Paula Paredes, Daniela Ferrante, Carla Cepeda & Jorge Rabinovich
1. Oliva et al. (2019) based upon primary productivity estimates concluded that, after long periods of overgrazing, Patagonia´s domestic stocks adjusted to regional-scale herbivore carrying capacity at the end of last century. Guanaco populations, a native camelid, increased thereafter driving combined grazing pressures once again over carrying capacity in some areas. 2. Marino, Rodriguez and Schroeder (2019) argued that domestic grazing is not really at equilibrium because domestic stocks are concentrated in areas that remain...

Data from: Genetic footprints of Iberian cattle in America 500 years after the arrival of Columbus

Amparo M. Martínez, Luis T. Gama, Javier Cañón, Catarina Ginja, Juan V. Delgado, Susana Dunner, Vincenzo Landi, Inmaculada Martín-Burriel, M. Cecilia T. Penedo, Clementina Rodellar, Jose Luis Vega-Pla, Atzel Acosta, Luz Ángela Álvarez, Esperanza Camacho, Óscar Cortés, José Ribamar Marques, Óscar Roberto Martínez, Rubén Darío Martínez, Lilia Melucci, Guillermo Martínez-Velázquez, Jose Ernesto Muñoz, Alicia Postiglioni, Jorge Quiroz, Philip Sponenberg, Odalys Uffo … & Ruben D. Martínez
BACKGROUND: American Creole cattle presumably descend from animals imported from the Iberian Peninsula during the period of colonization and settlement, through different migration routes, and may have also suffered the influence of cattle directly imported from Africa. The introduction of European cattle, which began in the 18th century, and later of Zebu from India, has threatened the survival of Creole populations, some of which have nearly disappeared or were admixed with exotic breeds. Assessment of...

Data from: Retracing the routes of introduction of invasive species: the case of the Sirex noctilio woodwasp.

Emilie Boissin, Brett Hurley, Michael J. Wingfield, Rimvydas Vasaitis, Jan Stenlid, Chuck Davis, Peter De Groot, Rodrigo Ahumeda, Angus Carnegie, Arturo Goldarazena, Paula Klasmer, Beat Wermelinger & Bernard Slippers
Understanding the evolutionary histories of invasive species is critical to adopt appropriate management strategies, but this process can be exceedingly complex to unravel. As illustrated in this study of the worldwide invasion of the woodwasp Sirex noctilio, population genetic analyses using coalescent-based scenario testing together with Bayesian clustering and historical records provide opportunities to address this problem. The pest spread from its native Eurasian range to the Southern Hemisphere in the 1900’s and recently to...

Data from: Mutualism effectiveness and vertical transmission of symbiotic fungal endophytes in response to host genetic background

Pedro E. Gundel, María A. Martínez-Ghersa, Marina Omacini, Romina Cuyeu, Elba Pagano, Raúl Ríos & Claudio M. Ghersa
Certain species of the Pooideae subfamily develop stress tolerance and herbivory resistance through symbiosis with vertically-transmitted, asexual fungi. This symbiosis is specific, and genetic factors modulate compatibility between partners. Although gene flow is clearly a fitness trait in allogamous grasses, since it injects hybrid vigor and raw material for evolution, it could reduce compatibility and thus, mutualism effectiveness. To explore the importance of host genetic background in modulating the performance of symbiosis, Lolium multiflorum plants,...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure in South African, French and Argentinian Angora Goats from genome-wide SNP data

Carina Visser, Simon F. Lashmar, Este Van Marle Koster, Mario A. Poli, Daniel Allain & Este Van Marle-Köster
The Angora goat populations in Argentina (AR), France (FR) and South Africa (SA) have been kept geographically and genetically distinct. Due to country-specific selection and breeding strategies, there is a need to characterize the populations on a genetic level. In this study we analysed genetic variability of Angora goats from three distinct geographical regions using the standardized 50k Goat SNP Chip. A total of 104 goats (AR: 30; FR: 26; SA: 48) were genotyped. Heterozygosity...

Male fairy-wrens produce and maintain vibrant breeding colours irrespective of individual quality

Alexandra McQueen, Kaspar Delhey, Flavia R. Barzan, Annalise C. Naimo & Anne Peters
Conspicuous colours may signal individual quality if high-quality individuals produce more elaborate colours or have a greater capacity to invest in colour maintenance. We investigate these hypotheses using repeated within-individual observations and experimentally-induced colour production in a wild bird, the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus). Male superb fairy-wrens undergo an annual moult from brown, non-breeding plumage to an ultraviolet-blue and black breeding plumage. Colour maintenance is especially relevant for this species because structural, ultraviolet-blue plumage colours...

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Resource Types

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Affiliations

  • National Agricultural Technology Institute
    18
  • University of Pretoria
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