6 Works

Data from: Measuring the magnitude of morphological integration: the effect of differences in morphometric representations and the inclusion of size

Fabio A Machado, Alex Hubbe, Diogo Melo, Arthur Porto & Gabriel Marroig
The magnitude of morphological integration is a major aspect of multivariate evolution, providing a simple measure of the intensity of association between morphological traits. Studies concerned with morphological integration usually translate phenotypes into morphometric representations to quantify how different morphological elements covary. Geometric and classic morphometric representations translate biological form in different ways, raising the question if magnitudes of morphological integration estimates obtained from different morphometric representations are compatible. Here we sought to answer this...

Data from: A survey of risk tolerance to multiple sclerosis therapies

Robert J. Fox, Carol Cosenza, Lauren Cripps, Paul Ford, MaryBeth Mercer, Sneha Natarajan, Amber Salter, Tuula Tyry & Stacey S. Cofield
Objective: To determine tolerance to various risk scenarios associated with current MS therapies. Methods: People with MS from the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry’s online cohort and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society were invited to complete a questionnaire on tolerance to real-world risks associated with a hypothetical therapy. Multiple risks levels were presented including, skin rash, infection, kidney injury, thyroid injury, liver injury, and PML. Results: Both progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)...

Historical allopatry and secondary contact or primary intergradation in the Puerto Rican Crested Anole, Anolis cristatellus, on Vieques Island

Liam J Revell, R. Graham Reynolds & Quynh N. Quach
Recent work revealed surprisingly deep mitochondrial genetic divergence in the lizard Anolis cristatellus among samples obtained from the small Caribbean island of Vieques. We sought to determine whether this had resulted from natural or anthropogenic causes, and (if the former), whether divergence occurred in a biogeographic context of allopatry followed by secondary contact, or via isolation-by-distance across the species’ historical range. We first estimated a mitochondrial gene tree for 379 samples and then genotyped 3,407...

Temporally varying disruptive selection in the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis).

Marc-Olivier Beausoleil, Luke Frishkoff, Leithen M'Gonigle, Joost Raeymaekers, Sarah Knutie, Luis De León, Sarah Huber, Jaime Chaves, Dale Clayton, Jennifer Koop, Jeffrey Podos, Diana Sharpe, Andrew Hendry & Rowan Barrett
Disruptive natural selection within populations exploiting different resources is considered to be a major driver of adaptive radiation and the production of biodiversity. Fitness functions, which describe the relationships between trait variation and fitness, can help to illuminate how this disruptive selection leads to population differentiation. However, a single fitness function represents only a particular selection regime over a single specified time period (often a single season or a year), and therefore might not capture...

Data from: Species richness change across spatial scales

Jonathan M. Chase, Brian J. McGill, Patrick L. Thompson, Laura H. Antão, Amanda E. Bates, Shane A. Blowes, Maria Dornelas, Andrew Gonzalez, Anne E. Magurran, Sarah R. Supp, Marten Winter, Anne D. Bjorkmann, Helge Bruelheide, Jarrett E.K. Byrnes, Juliano Sarmento Cabral, Robin Ehali, Catalina Gomez, Hector M. Guzman, Forest Isbell, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Holly P. Jones, Jessica Hines, Mark Vellend, Conor Waldock & Mary O'Connor
Humans have elevated global extinction rates and thus lowered global-scale species richness. However, there is no a priori reason to expect that losses of global species richness should always, or even often, trickle down to losses of species richness at regional and local scales, even though this relationship is often assumed. Here, we show that scale can modulate our estimates of species richness change through time in the face of anthropogenic pressures, but not in...

Data from: Patterns, dynamics and consequences of microplastic ingestion by the temperate coral, Astrangia poculata

Randi D. Rotjan, Koty H. Sharp, Anna E. Gauthier, Rowan Yelton, Eliya M Baron Lopez, Jessica Carilli, Jonathan C. Kagan & Juanita Urban-Rich
Microplastics (less than 5 mm) are a recognized threat to aquatic food webs because they are ingested at multiple trophic levels and may bioaccumulate. In urban coastal environments, high densities of microplastics may disrupt nutritional intake. However, behavioural dynamics and consequences of microparticle ingestion are still poorly understood. As filter or suspension feeders, benthic marine invertebrates are vulnerable to microplastic ingestion. We explored microplastic ingestion by the temperate coral Astrangia poculata. We detected an average...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Massachusetts Boston
    6
  • McGill University
    2
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Alabama at Birmingham
    1
  • Stanford University
    1
  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
    1
  • New England Aquarium
    1