4 Works

Data from: A worldwide perspective on the population structure and genetic diversity of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in New Zealand

Gabriela Tezanos-Pinto, Charles S Baker, Kirsty Russell, Karen Martien, Robin Baird, Alistair Hutt, Gregory Stone, Antonio A Mignucci-Giannoni, Susana Caballero, Tetsuya Endo, Shane Lavery, Marc Oremus, Carlos Olavarria & Claire Garrigue
Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) occupy a wide range of coastal and pelagic habitats throughout tropical and temperate waters worldwide. In some regions, "inshore" and "offshore" forms or ecotypes differ genetically and morphologically, despite no obvious boundaries to interchange. Around New Zealand, bottlenose dolphins inhabit 3 coastal regions: Northland, Marlborough Sounds, and Fiordland. Previous demographic studies showed no interchange of individuals among these populations. Here, we describe the genetic structure and diversity of these populations using...

Data from: Sperm whale population structure in the eastern and central North Pacific inferred by the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA

Sarah L. Mesnick, Barbara L. Taylor, Frederick I Archer, Karen K Martien, Sergio Escorza Treviño, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Sandra Carolina Moreno Medina, Victoria L Pease, Kelly M Robertson, Janice M Straley, Robin W Baird, John Calambokidis, Gregory S. Schorr, Paul Wade, Vladimir Burkanov, Chris R. Lunsford, Luke Rendell & Phillip A Morin
We use mitochondrial DNA (400bp), six microsatellites and 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 20 of which were linked, to investigate population structure of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) in the eastern and central North Pacific. SNP markers, reproducible across technologies and laboratories, are ideal for long-term studies of globally distributed species such as sperm whales, a species of conservation concern due to both historical and contemporary impacts. We estimate genetic differentiation among three strata in the...

Data from: A worldwide perspective on the population structure and genetic diversity of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in New Zealand

Gabriela Tezanos-Pinto, Charles S Baker, Kirsty Russell, Karen Martien, Robin Baird, Alistair Hutt, Gregory Stone, Antonio A Mignucci-Giannoni, Susana Caballero, Tetsuya Endo, Shane Lavery, Marc Oremus, Carlos Olavarria & Claire Garrigue
Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) occupy a wide range of coastal and pelagic habitats throughout tropical and temperate waters worldwide. In some regions, "inshore" and "offshore" forms or ecotypes differ genetically and morphologically, despite no obvious boundaries to interchange. Around New Zealand, bottlenose dolphins inhabit 3 coastal regions: Northland, Marlborough Sounds, and Fiordland. Previous demographic studies showed no interchange of individuals among these populations. Here, we describe the genetic structure and diversity of these populations using...

Data from: Sperm whale population structure in the eastern and central North Pacific inferred by the use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA

Sarah L. Mesnick, Barbara L. Taylor, Frederick I Archer, Karen K Martien, Sergio Escorza Treviño, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Sandra Carolina Moreno Medina, Victoria L Pease, Kelly M Robertson, Janice M Straley, Robin W Baird, John Calambokidis, Gregory S. Schorr, Paul Wade, Vladimir Burkanov, Chris R. Lunsford, Luke Rendell & Phillip A Morin
We use mitochondrial DNA (400bp), six microsatellites and 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 20 of which were linked, to investigate population structure of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) in the eastern and central North Pacific. SNP markers, reproducible across technologies and laboratories, are ideal for long-term studies of globally distributed species such as sperm whales, a species of conservation concern due to both historical and contemporary impacts. We estimate genetic differentiation among three strata in the...

Registration Year

  • 2010
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Cascadia Research
    4
  • New England Aquarium
    2
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • California State University Los Angeles
    2
  • Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l'Environnement
    2
  • University of Alaska Southeast
    2
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    2
  • University of Auckland
    2
  • Department of Conservation
    2
  • Health Sciences University of Hokkaido
    2