6 Works

Data from: Multilocus genetic diversity and historical biogeography of the endemic wall lizard from Ibiza and Formentera, Podarcis pityusensis (Squamata: Lacertidae)

Virginia Rodríguez, Richard P. Brown, Barbara Terrasa, Valentin Pérez-Mellado, Jose A. Castro, Antonia Picornell & M. Misericordia Ramon
Two monophyletic sister species of wall lizards inhabit the two main groups of Balearic Islands: Podarcis lilfordi from islets and small islands around Mallorca and Menorca and Podarcis pityusensis from Ibiza, Formentera and associated islets. Genetic diversity within the endangered P. lilfordi has been well characterized, but P. pityusensis has not been studied in depth. Here, 2430 bp of mtDNA and 15 microsatellite loci were analysed from P. pityusensis populations from across its natural range....

Data from: DNA metabarcoding reveals that 200-μm-size-fractionated filtering is unable to discriminate between planktonic microbial and large eukaryotes

Lemian Liu, Min Liu, David M. Wilkinson, Huihuang Chen, Xiaoqing Yu & Yang Jun
Microeukaryotic plankton (0.2–200 μm) are critical components of aquatic ecosystems and key players in global ecological processes. High-throughput sequencing is currently revolutionizing their study on an unprecedented scale. However, it is currently unclear whether we can accurately, effectively and quantitatively depict the microeukaryotic plankton communities using traditional size-fractionated filtering combined with molecular methods. To address this, we analysed the eukaryotic plankton communities both with, and without, prefiltering with a 200 μm pore-size sieve –by using...

Data from: DNA recovery from wild chimpanzee tools

Fiona A. Stewart, Alexander K. Piel, Lydia Luncz, Joanna Osborne, Yingying Li, Beatrice H. Hahn, Michael Haslam & Joanna Osborn
Most of our knowledge of wild chimpanzee behaviour stems from fewer than 10 long-term field sites. This bias limits studies to a potentially unrepresentative set of communities known to show great behavioural diversity on small geographic scales. Here, we introduce a new genetic approach to bridge the gap between behavioural material evidence in unhabituated chimpanzees and genetic advances in the field of primatology. The use of DNA analyses has revolutionised archaeological and primatological fields, whereby...

Data from: Pregnancy is detected via odour in a wild cooperative breeder

Jessica Mitchell, Michael A. Cant & Hazel J. Nichols
Among mammals, scent has long been known to encode oestrus; however, in many species, detecting pregnancy may also be important in terms of both competition and mate-choice. Here, we show, through odour presentation experiments, that pregnancy is discernible via scent by both sexes in the cooperatively breeding banded mongoose, Mungos mungo. Males spent more time investigating and were more likely to scent mark the odours of non-pregnant females, compared to pregnant females. Females showed increased...

Data from: Sex-specific association patterns in bonobos and chimpanzees reflect species differences in cooperation

Martin Surbeck, Cedric Girard-Buttoz, Christophe Boesch, Catherine Crockford, Barbara Fruth, Gottfried Hohmann, Kevin E. Langergraber, Klaus Zuberbühler, Roman M. Wittig & Roger Mundry
In several group-living species, individuals' social preferences are thought to be influenced by cooperation. For some societies with fission–fusion dynamics, sex-specific association patterns reflect sex differences in cooperation in within- and between-group contexts. In our study, we investigated this hypothesis further by comparing sex-specific association patterns in two closely related species, chimpanzees and bonobos, which differ in the level of between-group competition and in the degree to which sex and kinship influence dyadic cooperation. Here,...

Data from: The effect of roads on spider monkeys’ home range and mobility in a heterogeneous regenerating forest

Norberto Asensio, Elvin Murillo-Chacon, Colleen M. Schaffner & Filippo Aureli
Arboreal fauna living in tropical ecosystems may be particularly affected by roads given their dependency on forest cover and the high vulnerability of such ecosystems to changes. Over a period of four years, we followed subgroups of spider monkeys living in a regenerating dry tropical forest with 8.2 km of roads within their home range. We aimed to understand whether roads shaped the home range of spider monkeys and which road features affected their movement....

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Liverpool John Moores University
    6
  • University of Pennsylvania
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Mahidol University
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    1
  • University of Salamanca
    1
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    1
  • University of the Balearic Islands
    1
  • Arizona State University
    1
  • Universidad Veracruzana
    1