7 Works

Data from: Ontogeny of the Massospondylus labyrinth: implications for locomotory shifts in a basal sauropodomorph dinosaur

James M. Neenan, Kimberley E. J. Chapelle, Vincent Fernandez & Jonah N. Choiniere
Ontogeny is a vital aspect of life history sometimes overlooked in palaeontological studies. However, the changing geometry of anatomical structures during growth can be informative regarding ecological and functional reconstructions. The inner ear, or labyrinth, is an ideal ontogenetic study system because it has a strong functional signal in its morphology that is linked to locomotor mode. Yet almost nothing is known about labyrinth development in dinosaurs. We quantified labyrinth scale and geometry through ontogeny...

Data from: A well-preserved respiratory system in a Silurian ostracod

David J. Siveter, Derek E.G. Briggs, Derek J. Siveter, Mark D. Sutton & Derek E. G. Briggs
Ostracod crustaceans are diverse and ubiquitous in aqueous environments today but relatively few known species have gills. Ostracods are the most abundant fossil arthropods but examples of soft-part preservation, especially of gills, are exceptionally rare. A new ostracod, Spiricopia aurita (Myodocopa), from the marine Silurian Herefordshire Lagerstätte (430 Mya), UK, preserves appendages, lateral eyes and gills. The respiratory system includes five pairs of gill lamellae with hypobranchial and epibranchial canals that conveyed hemolymph. A heart...

Data from: The hatching mechanism of 130-million-year-old insects: an association of neonates, egg shells and egg bursters in Lebanese amber

Ricardo Pérez-De La Fuente, Michael S. Engel, Dany Azar & Enrique Peñalver
Hatching is a pivotal moment in the life of most animals. Diverse chemical, behavioural and mechanical methods have evolved in metazoans to break the egg membranes. Among them, many arthropod and vertebrate embryos hatch using ephemeral, frequently convergent structures known as egg bursters. However, the evolutionary processes by which hatching mechanisms and related embryonic structures became established in deep time are poorly understood due to a nearly complete absence from the fossil record. Herein we...

Data from: Whole-body photoreceptor networks are independent of ‘lenses’ in brittle stars

Lauren Sumner-Rooney, Imran A. Rahman, Julia D. Sigwart & Esther Ullrich-Lüter
Photoreception and vision are fundamental aspects of animal sensory biology and ecology, but important gaps remain in our understanding of these processes in many species. The colour-changing brittle star Ophiocoma wendtii is iconic in vision research, speculatively possessing a unique whole-body visual system that incorporates information from nerve bundles underlying thousands of crystalline ‘microlenses’. The hypothesis that these form a sophisticated compound eye-like system regulated by chromatophore movement has been extensively reiterated, with consequent investigations...

Data from: The evolutionary history of polycotylid plesiosaurians

Valentin Fischer, Roger B J Benson, Patrick S Druckenmiller, Hilary F Ketchum & Nathalie Bardet
Polycotylidae is a clade of plesiosaurians that appeared during the Early Cretaceous and became speciose and abundant early in the Late Cretaceous. However, this radiation is poorly understood. Thililua longicollis from the Middle Turonian of Morocco is an enigmatic taxon possessing an atypically long-neck and, as originally reported, a series of unusual cranial features that cause unstable phylogenetic relationships for polycotylids. We reinterpret the holotype specimen of Thililua longicollis and clarify its cranial anatomy. Thililua...

Data from: Plant interactions shape pollination networks via nonadditive effects

Gianalberto Losapio, Miguel A. Fortuna, Jordi Bascompte, Bernhard Schmid, Richard Michalet, Rainer Neumeyer, Leopoldo Castro, Pierfilippo Cerretti, Christoph Germann, Jean-Paul Haenni, Seraina Klopfstein, Francisco Javier Ortiz-Sánchez, Adrian C. Pont, Pascal Rousse, Jürg Schmid, Daniele Sommaggio & Christian Schöb
Plants grow in communities where they interact with other plants and with other living organisms such as pollinators. On the one hand, studies of plant–plant interactions rarely consider how plants interact with other trophic levels such as pollinators. On the other, studies of plant–animal interactions rarely deal with interactions within trophic levels such as plant–plant competition and facilitation. Thus, to what degree plant interactions affect biodiversity and ecological networks across trophic levels is poorly understood....

Data from: Tropical dung beetle morphological traits predict functional traits and show intra-specific differences across land uses

Elizabeth H. Raine, Claudia L. Gray, Darren J. Mann & Eleanor M. Slade
1. Functional traits and functional diversity measures are increasingly being used to examine land use effects on biodiversity and community assembly rules. 2. Morphological traits are frequently derived from a mean value of many individuals, and used directly as functional traits. However, this approach overlooks the importance of intraspecific differences. 3. We collected morphometric data from over 1700 individuals of 12 species of dung beetle to establish whether morphological measurements can be used as predictors...

Registration Year

  • 2018
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Affiliations

  • Oxford University Museum of Natural History
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  • University of Oxford
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  • University of Kansas
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  • University of Liège
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  • University of Sussex
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  • Queen's University Belfast
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  • University of Bologna
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  • Lancaster University Ghana
    1
  • University of Alaska System
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  • Naturhistorisches Museum
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